Question about Velodyne VX-10 Subwoofer

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No bass... The sub woofer stopped working all of a sudden. I checked all of the wiring. The blue AUX cable is hooked up along with the power supply. It is buzzing quietly and the light says that it is on standby but there is no bass. Whats up? Thanks.

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  • 124 Answers

One of a few things.

The fuse inside the amplifier section is blown.
The amplifier has died
The speaker is dead.

Best to return to the place you purchased the unit or contact Velodyne for service.

Posted on Jan 04, 2009

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How it can be connected to a stereo amp


hi,
if ur amplifier have a pre out, then u can connect that to ur L/R input of ur sub woofer.

if not the only way is, connect ur amplifiers speaker output to sub woofers speaker input and then connect ur speaker to sub woofer speaker output terminal. remember don't inter change positive and negative wires.

if ur amplifier have speaker A,B connection then it is very easy. connect the speaker A to ur left and right speaker. then connect speaker B to ur sub woofer's left and right speaker input. be sure to make that speaker A and B switch is in on position. the power on both and check it. ( use good quality speaker cable to connect the sub woofer)

your sub woofer is designed to work , both at low level and high level input.
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Dec 17, 2010 | Yamaha YST-SW215 Subwoofer

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I have hooked this up to a working reciever that


Fill in the blanks about the working receiver.

You mention another subwoofer, which suggests your receiver manages the bass and possibly sends most or all of it to the sub.

If it's NOT sending the bass to the speaker terminals you use to drive the AM5 that would explain it's virtually silent bass module.

If those speaker terminals on your receiver can be set to LARGE, do it. Otherwise they assume the speakers are incapable of handling bass.

Apr 02, 2010 | Bose Acoustimass 5 III System

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Passive radiator speaker wiring


Passive Radiators are not driven by the amp. They have no voice coil and no power goes to them. They are used to enhance the bass or lower frequencies in a speaker system. They work by utilizing the back pressure that a driver (woofer) produces. When a woofer produces sound, it moves forward and backwards inside the speaker cabinet. This backward motion is what drives the passive radiator. So in order for the passive radiator to work, it would have to be placed in speaker cabinet along with a woofer that is hooked up to an audio amp.

Jul 23, 2009 | Speakers & Subwoofers

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What is the proper way to connect to home theater system?


Does the Sub have a Low- Level input? This is a RCA type female connector, what you need to do is run a Male RCA cable from your home theatre where it says Sub-OUT and go into the Sub woofer Line in. Unless you only have speaker wire inputs on the back of the Sub then take the Left and Right front into the Sub speaker inputs and then out of the Sub speaker OUTS back to your speakers.

Feb 28, 2009 | Omage BB08 Subwoofer

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Subwoofer to receiver hookup


In general, there are two ways to hook up your sub-woofer. First using the high level outputs from your receiver ( speaker output from the front R & L speaker terminals ) run a set of wires from the outputs to the speaker inputs on the sub-woofer, you do this in concert with the speaker wires going to the front R & L speakers which you then attach to the R & L speaker outputs on the sub woofer amp. Note that the sub woofer doesn't power your front speakers, the connections from the sub amp are just a pass through connection where the signal needed by the sub is parasitically taken from the inputs.
Second is via a low level output from your receiver / amp to the low level input on your sub amp. This is normally done via a RCA type of patch cable and connected to the sub woofer RCA jack on the rear of the source receiver or amp, Next run the patch cord to the sub amp an into the RCA jack input. IF you have a right and left input, use the Right input.

john

Aug 18, 2008 | Speakers & Subwoofers

2 Answers

Subwoofer probelm


I suspect you have a bad cable, a poor ground or a bad
power supply inside the speaker amplifier. The amplifier
(inside the sub-woofer) could also be defective.
===
1) Bad cable or connector:
If the (braided shield/outer tube) of the coaxial input cable is
not grounded, the cable will pickup line frequency "hum"
from surrounding power lines, house wires, lights and
appliances.

This hum is then amplified by the speaker's amplifier
causing the constant bass sound you speak of.

Because the hum frequency fundamental is 60 Hertz in
North America, 50 Hertz in Europe, you hear it coming
mostly out of the sub-woofer, because the midrange and
high speaker circuits filter it out.

Check the input connectors, cable at both ends, wiggle
the jacks at a low volume setting to see if it changes.

Make sure that you are indeed using a properly shielded
coaxial cable.

A coaxial cable consists of a thin inner conductor, surrounded
by a flexible tube made up of a braided metal shield, which
must be grounded. This prevents hum from being picked up
by the sensitive amplifier inputs.
===

2) If the power supply within the sub-woofer's internal amplifier
is defective, the the power supply hum will also get coupled
into the amplifier and speaker with same results as above.

Power supply hum is typically twice the line frequency,
i.e. 120 Hertz, but not always, depending on what
component failed: Rectifier diode, filter capacitor, or
the voltage regulator.

3) Ground loops:
When you run very long cables between the source and
destination of an audio signal, multiple ground paths (must)
exist between the two points in space, creating complete
loop circuits.

Power line hum from the environment can (will) induce
heavy AC currents around these loops, creating a voltage
gradient across these cables, and in-between the end
devices.

Once again, this AC hum is coupled into the amplifier inputs.

Ground loops become a problem with cables over 10
feet long, and an astronomical problem for stage audio
engineers. To avoid ground loops, they must break
the circuit's continuity by using isolation transformers,
optical isolators, and/or differential input amplifiers.

So how long are your cables?

Most house stereo components are only designed to
handle 6 to 10 feet of cabling max.

30 feet is already asking for major trouble.

4) Feed back oscillation: This occurs when the output of
an amplifier is fed back to the inputs with a round trip
gain greater or equal to unity. The tiniest little electrical
disturbance is then amplified and re-amplified, over and
over again, usually at one preferred frequency, causing
the typical (ear-splitting) microphone squeal or howl.

In your situation feedback and/ loss of original signal
could be the result of mis-wiring the input cables.

Note that this is NOT as silly nor as unlikely as it sounds,
because many computer audio cards and even some
home stereo systems have re-configurable inputs and
outputs.

SOFTWARE configuration decides which jack at the
back does what !!!!

On my computer, for example, the Realtek audio driver
tries to automatically figure out what cable is connected
to each jack (usually it gets it wrong)

Using the Realtek control panel applet, I can then
manually re-configure the gray jack as input,
the green jack as bass, pink jack as center.... etc.

If this situation also applies to your system, please check
the software configuration. Connecting an output cable to
an input jack will certainly cause a lot of HUM and not
much music.

5) Finally, don't rule out internal sub-woofer failure. Unlike
the passive stereo/hi-fi speakers of days gone by, modern
multi-channel theater systems with front, center, rear and
sub-woofer speakers are internally amplified, with active
frequency cross-over filters and special effect/ surround
sound capabilities.

Usually, the large sub-woofer contains most of the
electronics, amplifiers and filters.

It feeds the other speakers, and it is controlled by
an external volume control module which can be separate
or built into one of the tweeters.

These sub-woofer electronics are prone to poor design,
overheating and early failure. (Even fresh out of the box
like yours)

If you cannot get it working, take it back to the store,
and make the NICE salesmen **** with it.

Good luck
Please rate my answers
Martin.

Jul 20, 2008 | Yamaha 5.1-Ch. Surround Sound Home Theater...

2 Answers

Sound problems through subwoofer


check all speakers wires andcheck test mode. every thing ok, may be input wiring problem ,check every thing after that internalcircuit may be problem..

Oct 08, 2007 | Speakers & Subwoofers

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