Question about Concept CC-452 Car Audio Amplifier

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No Output + Burned Transistor and something else...

Hi people, bought a Concept Amp. CD-810 class-D monobloc, connected and everythings was working fine... using it at very low volume so didnt notice there was no bass coming out, so when i noticed that i checked the fuses, and all fuses were gone (3x30A) so tried to replace them, but when i was trying that the fuses when sparking, i was strange cause i guess theres was a short but didnt have that in mind that moment (dunno wut i was thinking), so i unplugged the ground and connected the fuses and reconnected everything, when i turned it on, it blew up, so opened the amp and noticed that theres was a burned transistor (IRFP064N/mosfet), so bought that one and replaced and checked the circuit around for continuity anyway a friend told me that continuity not always means its ok, maybe theres short somewhere, anyway i got correct signal or well thats wut i thought, so replaced the transistor and tried again but it fried the same one, and these time none of the fuses where gone so im confused why the fuses wasnt working at all or maybe the short is in the fuses circuit?? im not a expert but learning jeje ;) All solutions, ideas or comments are very welcome. Regards

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Depending on which circuit the IRFP064N/mosfet was in then you either have a blown output section and you will need to look at the other mosfet's that work with the one you replaced or if it is in the power supply area then you will need to check the other mosfet's that work with it in the power supply. Of course you will have to test all the driving circuitry that is associated with either output or power supply, which ever is involved and be sure that the driving voltages are correct. Of course, in the power supply it would be a high frequency square wave of about 50% duty cycle. A schematic would probably be of great help. Good luck.

Posted on Mar 23, 2007

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit.

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1 Answer

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electech

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No picture


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