Question about Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

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How do i take photos indoors/ what settings do i use?

I'm going to a concert and i want to take some film photos, it's going to be indoors but i don't have the manual or anything to see what settings and shutter speed i should use. could you please tell me what shutter speed, setting, f/stop i should use?

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Alexisalejan,

well first how far away from the stage will you be?
will you be using available light or a flash unit?
shutter speed and f-stop depend on the light source and film speed. (iso )
the faster the film the less you have to use flash, the lower the f-stop the less depth of field you have, the kind of flash is important, most flash units are good for only around 20 ft.
i would use a high speed film and not use flash. flash will kill any colored lights. try to keep the f-stop at least f/8 and the shutter speed no less than 1/60 sec. have fun.

Posted on Dec 14, 2008

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My photos come out a pink-violet hue. camera is set on auto.


That is a problem with either old film or poor processing. Unless you're using a filter on your camera lens, colors like that are related to unstable film or poor/contaminated film processing.

May 07, 2014 | Nikon N50 35mm SLR Camera

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I've taken many photos so far with my Canon T70 but have no idea how many and when to stop.. i'm not counting the number of photos i've taken, haven't heard any beeping and don't know...


The maximum number of shots possible is 24 or 36 depending on the film length, although sometimes you can squeeze an extra one out of a film. If the film loaded correctly you will get a frame counter in the LCD. If the film did not load correctly, then you have not taken any photos as the film is still in the canister and unexposed.

Take the camera to a totally dark room (and I do mean absolutely pitch black) and open the camera. if you can feel the film canister and just the short leader then it didn't load and you can turn on the lights and try loading again. if there is just the canister and no film sticking out, then the film has rewound and you can turn the lights on and send the film for developing to see if the camera worked. If you feel film going from the canister right across to the take-up spool, then your film is still being used and you should close the back of the camera before turning on the lights again. The latter does not necessarily mean that your camera is OK though as it should be showing frame numbers, but it may be usable still. If after a few more shots the camera is still behaving just the same then it's got a fault.

A faulty t70 is really not worth repairing. It's complex, spares are mostly unavailable, and they are almost worthless even in perfect condition. Any of the earlier non-t-series Canon FD-mount bodies are far better and a lot more fixable. They are also usually near worthless and can be picked up free or very cheaply, but as they have less to go wrong and were designed with repairs in mind then many common faults can be fixed.

Jul 27, 2011 | Canon T70 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My pictures have a purple tint to them


You're either using old/expired film, or taking photos during dusk. Color film is balanced for daylight photography. Using it under conditions other than that will result in varying color casts on the resulting images.

Fluorescent lighting: Greenish
Indoor bulbs: Reddish/orange
Outdoor at night/dusk: Blueish/purpla
Ourdoor at dawn: Pink/blue

Or, you may have just gotten bad print work done. Try a different lab.

Jun 12, 2011 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera


Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

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1 Answer

When I turn the knob on the camera to be able to take another picture, the number still stays at zero. What's wrong with my camera?


There are a couple of possibilities that I can think of:

First, film must be loaded into the camera for the picture counter to increment.

Second, if you've loaded film, but the counter still does not change, it is possible the film is not advancing (the film release button/knob/lever that you use to rewind the film may be activated) or the film has slipped off the sprockets on the take-up spool.

If you can stand to lose the photos you may have already taken, just open the back of the camera and make sure the film is advancing when you take a photo.

If you can't possibly lose the photos, rewind the film and take the film to be developed. Try to find a local developer that only charges for the photos that "came out"... This can save a lot of money if only a few frames develop properly (or if none come out!)

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1 Answer

Where can you get nikon pronea film


Just look out for APS film, the actual brand doesn't matter as whatever the brand they're all made by the same few companies. Kodak Advantix and Fuji nexia are the most common. Get the 400 version for indoors and dull, overcast days, and 200 for shooting outdoors in bright conditions or indoors with flash.

Although it's effectively a dead format now, you'll still find it widely available online and in larger drugstores and supermarkets. Availability outside of major developed nations is very patchy except in areas which attract international tourists, so if that applies to you then you'll have to order online from a stockist such as Amazon.

APS film is more expensive than traditional 35mm film and produces inferior results as the negatives are smaller. Also, try to avoid buying in a large stock of film as the APS system was very badly designed and engineered, regardless of the camera brand. Most APS cameras are now broken and you shouldn't expect your Nikon Pronea to last long. When it does break it's likely to be the film transport mechanism and that will be the end of it as spares are not available.

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2 Answers

Film advance lever.


Do you press the shutter button to release the lever for the next photo? That's how you advance the film from the exposure to light, when first insterting the film.

Sep 16, 2008 | Nikon FE 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blue photos??


no filter on lens,right? heat damage to the film,or the film was not processed correctly, or outdated.
way over exposure is also apossibility. take your new exposed film to a different processor.

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1 Answer

Taking photos


jeep111

be sure batteries are good. pull up on the rewind knob to open film door. load film ,push down rewind knob. pull enough film to connect to take-up spool. close film door. advance film to counter # 1. look through finder and set meter ( push shutter button to turn on meter ) focus subject and fire shutter repeat to end of film. push rewind button ( bottom of camera ) rewind film.
remove lens by pushing button and turn lens left to remove.

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