Question about Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

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Blurring of close subjects and items.

I cannot seem to take a real close picture without blurring, and need them sharp and clear??

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Re: Blurring of close subjects and items.

Have you tried putting it into macro mode? (look for buttons or menu options with a picture of a flower). A.

Posted on Mar 11, 2007

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I love my camera, but most of my pictures turn out blurry in places, unless the subject is standing perfectly still.

Hi. When parts of the subject are moving it is normal for the subject to tend to be be blurred in those places. Blurring is minimised if you take pictures in bright light because the 'exposure' (the time needed for the sensor to collect enough light to take the picture) is less. Also the 'sensitivity' of the sensor can be increased by reducing the ISO setting in the menu so that the sensor needs less time to take the picture. However ISO settings higher than 200 tend to more and more make the image a bit blotchy. The 'aperture' is also relevant and F2 (wide open) lets in more light than say F5.6 (narrower), so helps to reduce blurring too. Mainly you rely on bright light to minimise blurring if the subject moves, but there is also a 'sports' scene mode which might help. Indoors, you more often need to use Flash to get a good picture by providing more light, but flash does not usually reach far enough to have much effect out of doors, unless the subject is close by. In 'auto' mode the settings look after themselves but have a good look at the Instruction Manual and experiment with 'manual' settings to find out how the camera works and read a few beginner's aricles to make things more interesting. Most of all have fun! Regards

Jan 21, 2011 | Canon PowerShot SX130 IS Digital Camera


Controlling Depth of Field

A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Digital Cameras

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It doesn't capture clear pics in less light

This is a general problem with low light. Because there is less light, the camera needs to hold the shutter open longer to collect enough light. This leads to two causes of blurring. First, because the shutter is open longer, the camera tends to move if you're holding it. Second, the subject may be moving, especially if you're taking pictures of people or pets.

There are several things you may be able to do to reduce the blurring.

Put your camera on a steady surface, or better yet, use a tripod. At the least, brace yourself and/or the camera against a wall, a table, or whatever.

Put more light on the subject if you can. Consider using your flash.

Many cameras allow you to increase the sensitivity of the sensor. Since you didn't specify the make and model, I'm afraid I can't give you specific instructions on how to do this.

Oct 16, 2010 | Digital Cameras

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Hi when ever i take pictures inside they always seem to be blurred unless i use the flash

Perfectly normal. Indoors there's much less light than there is under the sun. One way to compensate for this is to use the flash. This is limited in range, and will not work well if you have two (or more) subjects at different ranges.

Another way to compensate is to leave the shutter open longer to collect more light. This causes blurring if the subject is moving. It can also lead to blurring if the camera is moving, as it inevitably will if you're holding it in your hand.

Another way is to open up the aperture, letting in more light. Some exposure modes favor this, while others do the opposite. A related method is to use a faster lens, if your camera accepts interchangeable lenses. Since you didn't bother to specify the make and model of your camera, I can't tell you what modes you may have available, or any lens choices.

Another possible way to compensate is to increase the ISO sensitivity, so that the image can be made with less light. Again, without knowing what camera you have, I can't give you much details.

Jun 22, 2010 | Digital Cameras

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Blur problems.

With blur, the problem could be the camera, but is usually due to the photographer. You can try using flash, decrease the distance to your subject, before you take the picture, hold the camera very, very still until after the picture is taken. If these things fail, the camera might be defective.

Apr 22, 2010 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Trouble with close-ups

Press Macro button to on close up function. Macro button has flower mark on it and located in 4 navigation buttons.

May 17, 2009 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurring pictures

I had the same problem. Somehow my flash was set on "SL - Keep subjects and distant backgrounds bright." When I changed the flash to "Auto", it seemed to get rid of the blurry pictures.

Dec 08, 2008 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W90 Digital Camera

1 Answer

L11 Blurring


Firstly switch off the camera
press and hold the ok button and turn the camera on and off for few times
whilst keeping this button depressed


Jul 15, 2008 | Nikon Coolpix L11 Digital Camera

2 Answers

DSC p72 blurring

Hello Steve, I've bought that very same camera myself, and i feel quite happy with it. I do know what you're refering to since i've dealt with that problem before. About the Blurring "effect", i'm affraid this is due to a lack of focus regulation from you. In this camera it is possible to achieve very good results once you control the Metering and Focus in an accurate way. In other words you'll have to take over the Focus and Metering control regularly. As you may know the Focus Options are (if i'm not mistaken) , infinite, 7m, 3m, 1m, 0.5m, center, multiple. Basically if you're indoors there's no need to use the infinite, center or multiple focus (except in specific situations), which you may keep to outdoor Shots. Indoors, you'll get far better results, intensively using the 0,5m, 1m, 3m or 7m. Hope i didn't put it to much confuse. Summing it up a bit, you'll have to use more often these controls according to each single situation. Please, let me know something wether it worked or not. Regards

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P72 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure control options

The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are five scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: - Landscape + Portrait: Suitable for taking photos of both you subject and background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. - Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. - Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. - Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. - Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

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