Question about Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp Timer Switch-Double Pole/Single Thro

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How to wire.

I am replacing an old timer with the T103 unit. The wires coming out of the wall are as follows:
2 red, 1 white, 1 gray.
I can't tell what numbers to use on the T103.
Thanks.

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Installed timer and I'm getting breaker pop. I've tried several different ways to wire and it keeps poping the breaker. GE Replacement Timer 15600


1) If you are replacing T103, the T103 can be wired many different ways. Not all wiring diagrams are supported by GE 15600 replacement timer that fits into Intermatic box.

2) Double check your T103 terminals
T103 terminals should be A 1 2 3 4
If terminals 3 and 4 have wires, then GE is not correct replacement.
You can buy repair parts for Intermatic timer
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103

3) GE has terminals 1 and L which are connected by brass bridge. If brass bridge is removed, add a jumper wire and connect terminals 1 and L
GE has terminals 1-L X 2

4) Typical GE 15600 wiring shows on following link, in addition to links for parts and manual:
http://waterheatertimer.org/GE-timers-and-manuals.html#15306

White wires on terminal A connect to terminal X
Black wire on terminal 1 connects to terminal 1
Black wire on terminal 2 connects to terminal 2

Sep 11, 2011 | GE Vacuums

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

I am replacting my T103 timer with a GE 15600. The posts on the T103 are marked 1 2 3 4. However on the 15600 they are marked L 1 X 2. How do these map to each other?


1) If you are replacing T103, the T103 can be wired many different ways. Not all wiring diagrams are supported by GE 15600 replacement timer that fits into Intermatic box.

2) Double check your T103 terminals
T103 terminals should be A 1 2 3 4
If terminals 3 and 4 have wires, then GE is not correct replacement.
You can buy repair parts for Intermatic timer
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103

3) GE has terminals 1 and L which are connected by brass bridge. If brass bridge is removed, add a jumper wire and connect terminals 1 and L
GE has terminals 1-L X 2

4) Typical GE 15600 wiring shows on following link, in addition to links for parts and manual:
http://waterheatertimer.org/GE-timers-and-manuals.html#15306

White wires on terminal A connect to terminal X
Black wire on terminal 1 connects to terminal 1
Black wire on terminal 2 connects to terminal 2

5) Add a comment for more free help.
Also take advantage of fixya expert assistance live.
For a price, expert works with you while you work on timer or any do-it-yourself project.
Fixya is always less expensive than a service call.

Mar 06, 2011 | Garden

1 Answer

I have Intermatic timer WG 1573 208/277V 60Hz 3W stamped on the case. I would like to chage this unit to a 110V timer system if possible. (In other words just be able to switch clock motors) If this is...


WG1573 is a 240 Volt clock motor for T100 series timers.
This means you have T-104 timer.
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html
Image shown on link above is T104R outdoor timer.
T104 indoor timer is the same except door does not have rubber gasket.
Terminals are labeled A 1 2 3 4
If this is not your timer, then add a comment.

Following instructions will convert T104 240V timer to T103 120V timer

Clock motor can be replace with identical 120V clock motor from Grainger
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INTERMATIC-Time-Clock-Motor-1PNK1?Pid=search

Timer mechanism snaps out and clock motor is located on back.
Remove clock motor with star screwdriver tip

Connect new clock motor wires to DIFFERENT terminals than before.
Old clock was connected to terminals 1 and 3
New 120V clock motor is connected to terminals A and 1

Wiring for 120V T103 is shown on link below.
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103
White neutral wire must connect to terminal A
Black hot wire must connect to terminal 1

Dec 19, 2010 | Intermatic & Indoor/Outdoor Rain Tight...

3 Answers

Can I used the T103M dpst spst timer for christmas lights? I would be coming off 2 20amps breakers in a single slot. I relly don't understand what a dpst and spst are (what they do) I am trying to hook up...


T103M is 120Volt timer that can handle all the Christmas lights.
Minimum on-off time 1 hour.
Rotate dial until current time lines up with silver pointer.
Set on-off trippers on dial.
Let's go step by step.

1) T103 has terminals A 1 2 3 4 >> terminals are also called poles
DPST (double pole single throw) and SPST (single pole single throw) are two different ways to wire this particular timer.
T103 timer can be wired numerous ways... but your project is not complicated.
DPST means timer turns off two terminals/poles (double pole) with each click/throw of timer switch (single throw)
SPST means timer turns off one terminal/pole (single pole) with each click/throw of timer switch (single throw)

2) T103 timer is ST single throw, all the lights come on at same time. So this timer is 1 channel.
1 channel timers are either ON or OFF and everything turns on-off at same time.
You cannot stagger on-off times with 1 channel timer.
If you want upstairs and downstairs lights to come ON at different times, you need two timers .. or a 2-channel timer (which is different ballgame).

3) T103 timer has 120Volt clock motor that is connected to terminals A and 1.
Look at timer and you can see small white wires connected to A and 1 terminals that power 125V clock motor.
When wiring this timer, your wires from 20 amp breaker box connect to terminals A and 1.
Black hot wire from breaker must connect to terminal 1
White neutral wire from neutral busbar must connect to terminal A
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103
http://waterheatertimer.org/B220C.html

4) Terminal 1 must be hot so when timer switch clicks ON, it sends power to terminal 2.
Your load wires connect to terminals A and 2
I made simple drawing of SPST option showing how to wire T103 to 3 receptacles.
Fixya downgrades image so it's hard to see.
Hot wire to terminal 1
Load wire to terminal 2
Neutrals on terminal A
To see image larger:
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/110-600-21Kb.jpg

geno_3245_171.jpg
If you want to wire timer for DPST, which is necessary for loads exceeding 2 horsepower (1500 Watts) on each terminal
Notice black jumper wire from terminal 1 to terminal 3
Notice all white neutral wires to terminal A
To see image larger:
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/110-600-17Kb.jpg
geno_3245_172.jpg
I made third image for guy who was wiring high amperage blowers, that show wiring for two T103 timers. Having two timers would let upstairs and downstairs lights come on at different times.
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/110-with-2-timers.jpg

Dec 11, 2010 | Intermatic 24 Hour Mechanical Mechanisms...

1 Answer

I have an Intermatic T103 DPST timer installed now (120v). The clock mechanism has failed. I bought Tork 1103 guts to replace it. The wiring is a bit different. Can u map for me which wires go to which...


T-103 has 120V clock motor with 5 terminals A 1 2 3 4
Tork 1101 has 120V clock motor with 4 terminals L 1 X 2

T103 is DPST and can control one-or-two 120Volt loads, or one-or-two 240Volt loads.
Tork 1101 is SPST can control one 120Volt load

Common ground between these timers one 120 Volt load
Changeover for one 120 Volt load:
White wires T103 terminal A go to Tork terminal X
Black wire T103 terminal 1 goes Tork terminals L and 1 (there is brass connector plate that connects L and 1 - if connector is missing, jumper between L and 1)
Black wire on T103 terminal 2 goes Tork terminal 2

If Load requirement is greater than T1101, Grainger sells T103 clock motor for $16
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INTERMATIC-Time-Clock-Motor-1PNK1?Pid=search
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/timer-accessories/timers/electrical/ecatalog/N-8hi

How to wire T103
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103
T1101 wiring manual
http://waterheatertimer.org/pdf/110111021103WIRING.pdf

Dec 02, 2010 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

I have a T103 that replaced a old Tork timer. my problem is i have 3 wires black,red white where do they go?


T103 has 120volt clock motor.
If your circuit is 240volt, then change T103 for T104.
Electricians test before hooking up wires.
Use ordinary tester.
Separate wires and turn on power.
Test each wire to bare ground wire.
Tester will light up on hot wire.
In absence of bare ground, test each wire against other wires or against grounded surface to isolate the hot wire.
Hot wire connects to terminal 1 on T103 timer.
Now test hot wire to other wires (exclude bare ground)
Tester lights up on Neutral wire.
Neutral wire connects to terminal A.
The last wire must go to Load, so connect this wire to terminal 2.
Bare ground wire connects to green ground screw.
Turn on power, click manual override to check if load turns on and off.
Lift and rotate yellow dial until current time lines up with silver pointer.
Put trippers on outer edge of dial at on-off times.
Off tripper are brass colored.
Each tripper is marked.
Minimum 1 hour on-off period.

Nov 30, 2010 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

I having troble with my t103 timer to turn the lights on manualy i try to set the timer but for some reason doesn't work what can i do ???


T103 Intermatic timer has 120Volt clock motor and can control 120V or 240V Loads.
Wiring for timer is shown on following link:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-T104-Intermatic-timer.html#T103

Troubleshoot T103:
1) Manual override is working correctly, and it snaps crisp and clean, and Load turns on-and-off.
That means timer is basically good.

2) Next look to see if yellow dial is rotating.
If dial is not rotating, then 120Volt clock motor needs to be replaced.
Take photo of wiring and mark wires before starting.
Remove two white wires connected to screw terminals 1 and A.
Snap timer mechanism out of box, clock motor is on back of timer.
Use small star screwdriver to remove old clock motor.
Reattach white wires on terminals 1 and A, tighten screws very tight.
Reset current time: lift and rotate dial until current time lines up with silver pointer.
Grainger sells 125V clock motor:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INTERMATIC-Time-Clock-Motor-1PNK1?Pid=search

3) If dial is rotating, but gets stuck at certain times, or runs slow, then replace clock motor.

4) If dial is rotating, and trippers are attached to dial, but timer does not turn ON, then trippers are worn down and need to be replaced.
Grainger sells the T103 trippers
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INTERMATIC-Timer-Tripper-2E054?Pid=search

5) How Intermatic mechanical timers work:
Dial with ON-OFF trippers is rotated by clock motor.
Trippers on dial contact ON-OFF lever.
ON tripper pushes lever one direction.
OFF tripper pushes lever opposite direction.
Lever moves electrical contacts on back of timer that turn Load ON-OFF.
Manual override lever clicks back and forth with each ON-OFF action.

geno_3245_85.jpg

Nov 20, 2010 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

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