Question about Goodmans 257NS 20" TV

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Goodmans 336 NS

After a probable subwoofer too close incident (also possible cause - power spikes and low voltages are common here, but none particularly memorable when the fault occurred)my neighbour gave me a goodmans 336 NS which was basically showing all pink and a bit fuzzy. I have tried to degauss it by all the normal methods with mixed results - i have managed to get it to be blue or green instead of pink but never all at the same time. the effect is over the whole screen. inside the box is clean and there is no obvious burnt component - please let me know if there is something that i am missing. in particular is there a self de-gausser on the set? i cannot find it in any of the menus or anywhere on the remote or controls. Thanks in advance :)

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  • Nigel Ridehalgh
    Nigel Ridehalgh Mar 21, 2007

    Thanks Pr. But only any help if u have a source for schematics - I have tried and had no joy.

    :)

    ps i think the diffuser is part of the main board - please let me know if u think not?

    Next question is, if it is the diffuser or main board - any idea where i can get one? I haven't checked board numbers myself yet, but probably will soon, but if you have a goodmans spares site i'd be very interested.

    Thanks,

  • Nigel Ridehalgh
    Nigel Ridehalgh Mar 22, 2007

    thanks - oh well - at least i didn't pay for it.

    :)

  • Nigel Ridehalgh
    Nigel Ridehalgh Apr 28, 2007

    Thanks Bogdan - soldering iron was first thing i tried - techman reckons a proper coil is worth trying - will get one soon

    :)

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Hello Noggin, The degauss method involving soldering iron (the ones that use a transformer) is the best and effective as I know. Simply close the solder iron at one side with the transformer close to the screen, press power and move it around the screen. This should be done with the tv dissconected from power. Have you tried it, and with what result? Also from what I know older type of tv's have degauss coils, but they are only powered when the tv is reconnected to the mains, only when it is powered then. Durring normal operation and stand-by - on cicles, they don't appear to work. I'm not the tv specialist here, but hope this helps. Good luck

Posted on Apr 27, 2007

  • Motoi  Bogdan
    Motoi Bogdan Apr 28, 2007

    I haven't seen cases of a whole screen to become equally magnetised. Most often the edges come magnetised and due to more powerfull exposure all screen but not equally. Have you checked the filament voltage for the cathodic tube? It should be 6.3V but on some models it can be about 7 volts resulting in premature aging for the tube and lack of sharpness or color problems. I know of some devices on the marked that "revives" the tube at some level, maybe they will improve your colors.

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  • 67 Answers

It might be a defusion board which is what spits up the picture

Posted on Mar 21, 2007

  • Jay Wick Mar 21, 2007

    The shadow mask has probably been buckled on the picture tube so to be honest the repair is not cost effective after consulting with another tv tech this is the answer i got. hope it helps

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Tube amp sound distorts after 20-30 minutes running. what is the most possible reason?


Wow, old school! Humm...If I remember High gain input will distort a wave form. This means the amp increases the wave voltage to pass the maximum available voltage. But since it can't go any higher in voltage, the wave stops at the max (what ever the supply high voltage is rated at) then flattens out at this peak level until the wave drops back down. Your signal distorts any time the feed goes over the limit. Sometimes this is done on purpose as in Guitar amps where there is a separate dial that controls this 'effect'. I'm guessing you are using a regular amp with very simple controls like volume, tone (Bass, Trebble). Some older dedicated amps do not have a volume input but may have a 'Gain' knob which just about serves the same purpose as the volume control. This gain knob is usually set at a level BEFORE distortion can set in from your signal source. Hopefully once properly set you won't overdrive the amp and get unwanted distortion. The problem rises when there are multiple sources of signal say from a Radio Tuner, Turntable (ceramic or Magnetic), and the newer CD, DVD, MP3 players. You must also note that many of the devices after Y2K (wow 18 years ago!) don't have a 'Line' or low level output. Most equip only have earphone outputs which will be too high for use on amplifier. High level output are used to drive head phones or ear buds. You must use anttenuator device to reduce the power for low level use. Donno, if those are still around as Radio Shack stores have closed down.
* Okay assuming you know all this and your amp WAS working normally at one time, AND this is an old 1950-1970's tube amp. Then you probably have a shorted (burnt?) gain or volume knob. Volume Resistor (Pot) cleaner sprayed into component may help. But usually components this old will need replacement. Dirty pots will cause cracks, pops, and scratchy sounds from speaker. This is the most common cause for unstable volume (gain) in amps.
* Another problem may be a shorted or partially bad signal capacitor which is just off the volume/gain pot or directly at the input of the amp section. Capacitors may go bad if a voltage spike (surge) hits it. These are low voltage devices so it does not take much to spike them. Electrolitic caps will sometimes self heal but fail again as input voltages spike near it's limit. You will need an audio electronic tech to go through and check all the components and replace as needed. Yes this is costly as there are not many 'old school' people around. But with some of these antique prices for tube amplifiers (especially bass guitar amps) you have to decide if it's worth it. There are new tube amps out there for audio pureists, so you may want to check that option.
* Okay, worst for last. Tube going bad (very common). Good luck on finding a replacement. I've seen them available on eBay and Amazon but don't know the quality. Very old TV/Radio shops in an old town may have them and worth a check if they are still open. You may also find them at an old music store.
* There are other possible problems (Power supply, Transformer, Bad contacts on tube socket, Bad solder joints, etc.) But really require a tech to trouble shoot and locating replacement parts to initiate repairs.
* since the problem shows up after the amp is heated up and hot. Check the vents for dust and vac out cob webs and debris. Placing a small (small!) fan to blow on the back may help, but over heating usually causes the power supply to heat up as well and may cause arcs in the high voltage section. High heat also breaks down old style capacitors.
* There is a reason why most people switched to transistors and now power ICs. Tubes have a warmer tone that few people can detect as most of us (Rockin '60-70's) have blown out our hearing long ago.
Aloha, ukeboy57

May 28, 2018 | The Audio Players & Recorders

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Troubleshooting Guide


  • Problem: Totally dead oven.
    Possible causes:
    1. No power to outlet (blown fuse or tripped breaker or GFCI).
    2. Blown main fuse - likely due to other problems.
    3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
    4. Defective controller or its power supply.
    5. Clock needs to be set before other functions will operate (some models).

  • Problem: Totally dead oven after repair.
    Possible causes:
    1. Cabinet screws replaced in incorrect location (safety interlock not engaged).
    2. Any number of screwups. :)

  • Problem: No response to any buttons on touchpad.
    Possible causes:
    1. Door is not closed (some models).
    2. You waited to long (open and close door to wake it up).
    3. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    4. Defective interlock switches.
    5. Faulty controller or its power supply.
    6. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    7. Defective/damaged touchpad.

  • Problem: Oven runs when door is still open.
    Possible causes:
    1. Damaged interlock assembly.
    2. Cooling fans (only) running due to bad sensor or still warm.

  • Problem: Oven starts on its own as soon as door is closed.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective triac or relay.
    2. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    3. Defective controller or its power supply.
    4. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    5. Defective/damaged touchpad.

  • Problem: Oven works but display is blank.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective controller or its power supply.
    2. Broken display panel.
    3. Oven needs to be reset (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).

  • Problem: Whacked out controller or incorrect operation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Previous or multipart cook cycle not complete.
    2. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    3. Defective controller or its power supply.
    4. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    5. Defective/damaged touchpad.
    6. Defective sensor (particulalry covection/mirowave combos).

  • Problem: Erratic behavior.
    Possible causes:
    1. Previous or multipart cook cycle not complete.
    2. Bad connections in controller or microwave generator.
    3. Faulty relay - primary (or HV side, much less commonly used).
    4. Defective controller or its power supply.
    5. Bad contacts/connections on mechanical timers. Intermittent fuse.
    6. Power surge at start of cook cycle confusing controller.
    7. Microwave (RF) leakage into electronics bay.

  • Problem: Some keys on the touchpad do not function or perform the wrong action.
    Possible causes:
    1. Touchpad or controller board contaminated by overenthusiastic cleaning.
    2. Defective/damaged touchpad.
    3. Controller is confused (pull plug for a minute or two to reset).
    4. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Microwave oven does not respond to START button.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective START button.
    2. Faulty interlock switches.
    3. Door is not securely closed.
    4. Faulty controller.
    5. You waited too long - open and close door to wake it up!

  • Problem: No heat but otherwise normal operation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Blown fuse in HV transformer primary circuit or HV fuse (if used).
    2. Bad connections (particularly to magnetron filament).
    3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
    4. Open HV capacitor, HV diode, HV transformer, or magnetron filament.
    5. Shorted HV diode, HV capacitor (will blow a fuse), or magnetron.
    6. Defective HV relay (not commonly used).

  • Problem: Timer and light work but no heat, cooling fan, or turntable rotation.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective (lower) door interlock switch or door not closing fully.
    2. Faulty relay or triac.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when closing or opening door:
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective door interlock switch(s).
    2. Interlock switch knocked out of position.
    3. Misaligned door.

  • Problem: Loud hum and/or burning smell when attempting to cook.
    Possible causes:
    1. Shorted HV diode, magnetron.
    2. Burnt carbonized food in or above oven chamber.
    3. Shorted winding in HV transformer.
    4. Frayed insulation on HV wiring.

  • Problem: Arcing in or above oven chamber.
    Possible causes:
    1. Burnt carbonized food deposits.
    2. Exposed sharp metal edges.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when initiating cook cycle.
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective interlock switches or misaligned door.
    2. Shorted HV capacitor.
    3. Shorted HV diode.
    4. Shorted magnetron (probably won't blow main fuse but HV fuse if used).
    5. Defective triac.
    6. Old age or power surges.
    7. Defective HV transformer.
    8. Short in wiring due to vibration or poor manufacturing.

  • Problem: Fuse blows when microwave shuts off (during or at end of cook cycle).
    Possible causes:
    1. Defective triac (doesn't turn off properly).
    2. Defective relay.
    3. Shorting wires.

  • Problem: Oven heats on high setting regardless of power setting.
    Possible causes:
    1. Faulty primary relay or triac or HV relay (not commonly used).
    2. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Oven immediately starts to cook when door is closed.
    Possible causes:
    1. Shorted relay or triac.
    2. Faulty controller.

  • Problem: Oven heats but power seems low or erratic.
    Possible causes:
    1. Low line voltage.
    2. Magnetron with low emission.
    3. Faulty controller or set for wrong mode.
    4. Stirrer (or turntable) not working.
    5. Intermittent connections to magnetron filament or elsewhere.
    6. Faulty primary relay or triac or HV relay (not commonly used).

  • Problem: Oven heats but shuts off randomly.
    Possible causes:
    1. Overheating due to blocked air vents or inoperative cooling fan.
    2. Overheating due to bad magnetron.
    3. Bad connections in controller or microwave generator.
    4. Faulty interlock switch or marginal door alignment.
    5. Faulty controller.
    6. Overheating due to extremely high line voltage.
    7. Stuck stirrer fan resulting hot spots detected by sensors.

  • Problem: Oven makes (possibly erratic) buzzing noise when heating.
    Possible causes:
    1. Fan blades hitting support or shroud.
    2. Vibrating sheet metal.
    3. Vibrating transformer laminations.
    4. Turntable or stirrer hitting some debris.

  • Problem: Oven light does not work.
    Possible causes:
    1. Burnt out bulb :-).
    2. Bad connections.

  • Problem: Fans or turntables that do not work.
    Possible causes:
    1. Gummed up lubrication or bad motor bearing(s).
    2. Loose or broken belt.
    3. Bad motor.
    4. Bad thermostat.
    5. Bad connections.

on Mar 30, 2008 | Kenmore 80412 Microwave Oven

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You most likely have an improper ground or no ground at all. Ground out your amp and the will probably take care of the noise. The other thing that can cause this is cross over from a high voltage source. You may have your low voltage lines to close to high voltage and getting bleeding of signal. The last thing, which should really be the first thing to check, is connections. One strand of copper not conntected can cause all sorts of problems.

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I have a self-installed Leviton TTI06-1LM dimmer (600w capacity) that controls a halogen light that uses 12x 12v/20w (140w total) halogen lights. The dimmer works fine, but once a day, or perhaps every...


Your issue is that the dimmer is not rated to handle the type of fixture/lamps its controlling.

From a lighting control standpoint, the 12V-lamps classify as "low-voltage halogen" and, somewhere in that circuit, have a transformer(s) converting the 120V~ down to 12V~. Using incandescent dimmers (like the one you are using) can cause compatibility issues with those transformers. What I suspect is happening is that the incompatibily is either throwing voltage spikes or current spikes on the line which are causing the dimmer to enter some sort of "safety" mode to shut everything down before any problems occur.

My recommendation is to first figure out what type of transformer it is: Either magnetic low-voltage, or electronic low-voltage. Ideally you would contact the transformer manufacturer (or look up their specs online) to figure that out. Other rules of thumb: if the transformer's big & bulky, it's probably magnetic - conversely if its lightweight, it's probably electronic. If its only one transformer controlling all of the lamps together, it's probably magnetic - conversely if its one of those transformers where the transformer and light bulb come togheter as one assembled unit and then snap into the track, it's probably electronic.

Then make sure the dimmer is rated for magnetic low-voltage, or electronic low-voltage (depending upon what the transformer is).

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Make sure the thermostat is calling for the respective seaon and see if it works. A power outage shouldnt interrupt the furnace unless you had really low voltage or a voltage spike. Try it and see

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Malibu Lights have voltage but 2 in the string of


If voltage is present, it has to be the bulb, usually, depending on the socket. Look at the socket closely, and make sure that the base makes proper contact with the bulb. They can distort just enough to trick you. If you can, make a set of mini-jumpers with alligator clips and wire. Connect from the base (socket) to a known good bulb. It's quite possible that there can be voltage present in the wiring, and none to the light, indicating that either there is a problem with the connection where the wiring passes through on the way to the next light, or in the fixture itself. My guess is that in the press-on connection, one of the spikes has missed the wire. Take that apart and reconnect; it'll probably do the trick.
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I would think that:

Low voltage. A lack of proper voltage increases the current flow (amps) and can cause overheating, thus, a burnt wire. Remember, the lower the voltage, the higher the amps.

Bad connection. Poor connections can cause small amounts of arcing, thus burning the connection. This adds resistance to the circuit which causes a possible voltage drop and, again overheating due to higher amps.

Since all that equipment is on the same circuit, I would really think it is a voltage drop situation. With everything calling for power at the same time, the breaker trips. In some cases, it may be just enough for the breaker not to trip but still have a low voltage situation.

There is the possibility of an over current, such as a power spike from the power company but it would have to happen more than just a time or two.
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