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More problems lol

When i turn my computer on it loads up but it show a breif message sayin ide channel 1 no 80 conductor cable installed and wehn i go into my bios it will just suddonly crash and if i press the restart button on the front of my computer i will jst stay on the load up screen telling me about my cpu and nothing else but it will freeze up when i restart aswell

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  • 4 more comments 
  • ashley hunter Dec 12, 2008

    no it just freezes telling me about my cpu

    and i installed a ne dvd drive

  • ashley hunter Dec 12, 2008

    also when i go into my bios it just freezes

  • ashley hunter Dec 12, 2008

    mycomputer is a pain in rhe arse lol

  • ashley hunter Dec 12, 2008

    Comment posted on Dec 12, 2008
    no it just freezes telling me about my cpu
    and i installed a ne dvd drive.


    it just tells me what speed its being clocked at and what make and model it is

  • ashley hunter Dec 13, 2008

    no i never got it fixxed because everytime i go into the bios it just crashes a voted because you said you wanted to get to guru so i voted fixya all the time haha

  • ashley hunter Dec 13, 2008

    a i see you got to guru

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Hy Ashley,

First up,
Your channel 1 no 80 conductor cable,
tell me that you have mounted a new HDD to your computer,
- -
If there isn't a 80 wire cable, then the drive that came with the box was not a speedy one.
If you only have a 40 wire cable the drive will be limited to 33MB/s transfer versus 100 or 133MB/s that's possible with the 80 wire cable.

With the 40's, all the wires are signal carriers (potentially). With the 80's, there is a ground wire between each signal wire to prevent bleed over. Bleed over can affect signal integrity, cause errors, and slow down performance.

you can fix that in one of two ways(or maybe both):-):

1. Go into your BIOS, and set it to run the hard drive auto detection to make sure its not holding on to any old hard drive settings.


2. Make sure that all connections are tight. You might want to try a different cable and if you do make sure it is the 80 wire type. The connectors on the 80 wire are colored (black,blue and gray)

The part with it telling you about your CPU is just a part of the testing procedure.

kind regards
/Teis
remember to vote

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

  • Teis Thomsen
    Teis Thomsen Dec 12, 2008

    Hi Asley,

    I suppose you got it fixed as you voted?

    else, let me know!

    /Teis

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When I open Dell 24000 I get an error sign primary drive 0 not found It tells me to hit f2-- but when I do I get no response. A colleague told me it was a loose cable so i have opened the tower but I do...


the hard drive IDE cables are flat, ribbon cables, usually grey and about 3 inches wide. do not confuse this with the floppy drive cable, which will look identical, except that it is 2 inches wide.

the cable could be loose on either the motherboard IDE controller end or the hard drive end, so wiggle it in tighter, or unplug and then re-plug it at both ends, and then try to boot. if that does not work, then replace the cable.

if a new cable does not fix it, then the hard drive itself may have failed. install the hard drive in a DIFFERENT working computer as a secondary (slave drive) by installing it to the middle connector of the IDE cable (IDE cables have a connector for the "master" or only drive at the end, and a plug for a "slave" drive in the middle of the cable), and see if you can access it. it will probably show up as the "E" drive under "computer" or "my computer". if it does not show up, check and see if it shows up under "administrative tools>computer management>disk management". if the drive is not showing up, then it is dead. if the drive works in the second computer, then the IDE CONTROLLER is the culprit.

if the motherboard's integrated IDE controller is dead, you may want to try the OTHER IDE controller socket. most computers from that era have 2 IDE controller sockets, and usually attach the hard drive(s) to one, and the cd/dvd rom(s) to the other. since the hard drive cables have plugs for 2 devices, you can attach both the hard drive and a single cd/dvd drive to the 2nd ide controller socket, in cases where the 1st ide controller soocet no longer works. attach the hard drive to the end of the IDE cable, and the cd/dvd drive to the middle of the IDE cable, as the "master" or boot device should always be attached to the end of the IDE cable.

you can also purchase an add-in, pci card ATA/IDE controller card, and use this instead of the motherboard's integrated IDE controller sockets.

Nov 06, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to install 80 conductor cable? because when i turn on my computer it displays no 80 conductor cable installed


It means you're still using the 40 conductor cable from the MB IDE to the
hard drive. The 80 Conductor Cables are used to take advantage of the newer
Ultra/ATA-66 and up IDE drives. (They will still work with the 40
conductor cable, but slower.)

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My cd-roms work seperstely but not as a pair. The small 3-prong hookup wire is not connected to anything


By 'work' are you referring to loading software, being able to see the drive in windows and find/access files on the drive,... or are you referring only to playing cd music directly from the drive(s). Most likely the 3 conductor wire you are referring to is specifically for the audio playback of cd music directly from the drive to the sound card. In any case, the 3 conductor audio cable is not necessary for the drive to operate.
For the moment I will assume you are adding a new or at least second cd/dvd drive to your system:
If you can only use one at a time (not being able to see at least one drive in windows when both are connected, or not see any drive when both are connected) the master/slave settings are not correct on the drives. On each of the drives is a series of pinouts between the IDE connector and the power connector. Either in front of the pins or on a label on the top of the drives you will see MA, SL, CS or Master, Slave, Cable Select. If your IDE (Flat, wide cable with 1 conductor having a red stripe has the words Master and Slave stamped on it, you may use the shortout connector and set both drives to CS). If the cable is not labeled you may not be able to use Cable Select and have to set one drive to Master and the other to Slave. In either case,.. once you set the drives appropriately, and connect the cables correctly,.. both drives will show up in windows and be accessible.
I hope this helps you with the issue.

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1 Answer

Installation of a 2nd hard drive steps & tips


Step 1: Back up and scout around

First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.

Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.

We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.

Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows.

Step 2: Examine data and power connections


Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.

First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.

If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)

Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.

Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.

IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter).

Step 3: Mount and connect the drive



When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).

Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.

Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.

Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case.

Step 4: Configure the BIOS

Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.

Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.

Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check.

Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive


Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.

With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.



Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.

Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

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2 Answers

Not able to install windows xp


cable conductor number will only decrease performane not cause problems, check it for damage try diff cable and/or cd drive / windows CD.

Aug 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cannot get 2 IDE devices to show in bios.


Does the computer have two IDE channels? If so set the Maxtor HDD as master on the primary channel and the DVD drive as master on the secondary channel. Also right click on My Computer, left click on Manage and left click on Disk Management and see if the drives show up there. Also check the boot order in BIOS.

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1 Answer

IDE Drive not found on startup


I am assuming that the cd and DVD drives are on the Ide right ?? thats because one of the drives jumper is set wrong. If you take a look at the back you will find it saying master / slave / Cable select with eighter a 6 to 10 pins. basically one needs to be set to master and connected with the top piece of the cable and the other set to slave and connected with the middle of the cable. and the other jacks into the main board. If i misunderstood you please respond correcting me as soon as possible so i can be of further help.

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1 Answer

Hard drive problem


Although I covered most of the ways to speed up Windows boot time in another article, I encountered a unique roadblock recently that made me write this article. 
During the last week I was asked by a customer to upgrade one of their office computers from Windows 98SE to Windows XP. Normally this is pretty standard, however because their current hard drive was only a 20GB with a gig or so remaining I wanted to upgrade their hard drive as well. 

I proceeded to ghost the drive to a larger hard drive and then installed an upgrade version of Windows XP on top of Windows 98 to preserve all of their settings and programs.

Everything went flawlessly, until I was finished...

  


After I completed the Windows XP upgrade, I shut down the computer completely and restarted it. The computer took FOREVER to boot into Windows XP. It was literally 2 minutes before I saw the Windows XP logo screen and another 30 seconds more before the desktop appeared. This was definitely a problem. 

After checking multiple settings in the BIOS, I compared the old and new hard drives. Everything seemed to be normal, except one. The old hard drive was setup to Cable Select and as my normal routine I had set the new hard drive as a Master drive. I changed the new hard drive to Cable Select, rebooted the computer, and the Windows logo screen came on seconds after the POST screen as before. Therefore, I have to add one more item to my list of ways to make Windows boot faster. Try changing the hard drive from Master to Cable Select, check the boot up speed and switch back to Master if you don't see a change.

Master/Slave Settings

Now for a refresher course on hard drive connections. When connecting more than one hard drive to a computer on the same IDE controller, you generally have to assign one as the primary (master) and one as the secondary (slave). You do this by changing the jumpers on the hard drive next to the power connector. Normally, the drive will have a diagram to let you know which jumper should be set for a master drive and which to set for a slave drive. You'll notice in the picture below the jumpers are circled on the end of the drive and the top of the drive shows the diagram to follow.



After changing the jumpers, connect the hard drive cable from the motherboard to the hard drives. Under normal circumstances, the end of the drive cable attaches to the Master hard drive, while the inside connector on the cable connects to the Slave drive. 

What About Cable Select?

Cable Select (CS) settings were designed to make it easier to connect hard drives because you didn't need to bother with setting the Master/Slave jumpers. You just connect the drives and depending on where you connected them to the cable the computer would know which is Master and which is Slave...in theory. Now comes the confusing part.

With cable select, you first needed a special 40 conductor IDE cable that would determine master/slave connections. This was different from the normal IDE cables at the time. Also, the Master connector on CS cables was the inside connector not the end connector. This made for a very confusing switch from everyday master/slave configurations.

80 conductor Ultra DMA cables WILL determine the Master/Slave settings through Cable Select however. So as technology advances, Cable Select as a concept may still catch on. With the newer Ultra DMA cables, you can set both drives to Cable Select (CS), connect them and they will work. Another change with the 80 conductor cables, the Master connector is on the end of the cable where it should be. In situations where you are using a newer Ultra DMA drive and cable, you can use Cable Select or standard Master/Slave jumper settings and the drive will boot properly.

In my scenario to start this article, the change from Master/Slave to Cable Select for this particular computer reduced the Windows boot time by more than 2 minutes.

For more information on Master/Slave settings versus Cable Select visit the following pages:

Mike's Hardware: How to Connect IDE Hard Drives

Configuration using Cable Select

UnixWiz.Net: Using IDE Cable Select

Oct 18, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Installed a new Optical Drive and require assistance in the wiring


What kind of optical drive? Is this a CD, DVD?, Blue ray,
or an opto-ferro-magnetic floppy?

Generally:

1) External drive:
============
a) just power it up and connect it to the PC using an USB
or firewire (1394) cable. If it is USB, make sure your PC
is set up for USB-2 which is astronomically faster.

b) The windows operating system should automatically
detect it and install the low level device drivers.
Then you can run the installation driver CD that came
with the drive.

2) Internal drive:
==========

a) Shut down Windows from the START menu,
chose shut down the system, NOT restart.

b) When it finishes shutting down, turn of the
power at the back (!) of the PC and unplug
the power cord.

Now turn the power switch back on for a few
with the cord unplugged, then shut it off again.

This will drain any internal capacitors inside the
power supply to make sure you don't fry anything
while you poke around.

c) Open up the computer case and look to see where
the other hard drives are installed and physically
mount the new optical drive inside the case.

d) Locate a spare power cable coming from the power
supply (Black, Red and Yellow wires) and hook it
into the back of the drive.

It should only fit one way, but there are several
different kinds of connectors, depending on the
drive type, so you may need an adapter cable.

i) Large 4 pin connector = Red, Yellow, Black, Black
ii) Miniature -//- = -//-
iii) SATA power cable = Small black hooked beastie.

Also make sure the power supply can handle
the extra current, this depends on the other stuff
such as drives and video card you already have in
the machine.

If your power supply is less than 600W on a modern
machine, now may be the time to upgrade it.

I have two video cards, 8 hard drives and a DVD,
so I had to upgrade to a 1000W to prevent my
system from randomly crashing during boot up,
when everything spins up for a self-test.

e) Once the power is connected, you need to connect
the data cable, which comes in a least 3 different
types:

IDE or PATA = Parallel ATA ribbon cable

SATA = Serial ATA cable, small flat cable with a red,
blue or orange jacket, and small black
hooked connectors at each end.

Note that these are a different size and
shape from the SATA power cables.

SCSI = pronounce scuzzi, no longer common.

One end of this data cable connects to the back of the
optical drive, the other to the motherboard, but this is
where it gets more complicated, because the mother
boards are fussy about which slot you plug them into.

You need to follow your motherboard manual here (HP) !

For SATA cables, you have to make sure that the motherboard
can handle them, older motherboards cannot, requiring an
adapter card. Also many of the new motherboards offer
multiple drive configurations such as RAID.

=============================
RAID = Redundant Array of Independent Drives:
RAID 0 = STRIPE for high speed at the cost of security
RAID 1 = MIRROR for data redundancy at the cost of $ cost
RAID 01 = Stripe of mirrors
RAID 10 = Mirror of stripes
RAID 5 = Stripe with parity compromise
etc...
=============================

Anyway, the problem is that on these mother boards some
of the SATA connectors are general purpose (which is what
you need), while others are not (i.e dedicated RAID),

and you may have to change jumpers on the board
or BIOS settings to get it to work right.

Also if the optical drive is to be bootable, then it sould
be connected to SATA1 or SATA2, but that again depends
on the motherboard and the BIOS boot sequence settings.

===

With the older style IDE or PATA drives, which includes most
optical drives (since SATA is fairly recent), most motherboards
provide two separate IDE ports, each of which can handle a
pair of drives for a total of four.

IDE1, Master = Drive 0
IDE1, Slave = Drive 1
IDE2, Master = Drive 2
IDE2, Master = Drive 3

Each pair of drives shares a single ribbon cable.
Older cables have 40 conductors,
Newer cables have 80 conductors for UDMA.

While the end connectors are the same, only 40 conductors,
the 80 conductor cables have interlaced grounding, which
allows them to transfer data at a higher speed.

Older optical drives used the 40 conductor, newer ones
use the 80 conductor, but there is no harm done using
the 80. If the ribbon cable came with the optical dive,
you can use it if you are plugging it into a separate IDE
port, BUT

Never use a 40 conductor ribbon cable if it is shared between
the optical and the hard drive, because this will slow down
the hard drive to the lower UDMA speed.

Now about the Master Slave thing:
=========================
1) Each PATA=IDE port can only handle one master/ slave pair.

2) You must never connect two MASTERS or two SLAVES
to the same cable.

3) The boot hard drive must be a MASTER on IDE1
for most systems, unless the BIOS has a way
remapping them.

4) When a hard drive and an optical drive share the same
IDE port and cable, the hard drive should be the MASTER,
for maximum speed, optical drives are often slower.

5) IDE hard drives and optical drives use a set of
jumpers near the IDE connector to determine if they
act as a MASTER or a SLAVE. This should be set before
you install them, because it is very hard to get at the
jumpers afterwards:

MASTER this forces the drive to act as a MASTER
SLAVE this forces the drive to act as a SLAVE

CABLE SELECT special color coded ribbon cables
(80 conductor) must be used to make this work.
These now come with most new motherboards.

The blue connector at the far end of the cable, away from
the other two goes into the motherboard.

The black connector at the opposite end (near the gray one)
goes into the MASTER drive.

The gray connector in the middle goes to the SLAVE drive.
(both drives should be setup as CABLE SELECT for this to
work)

When connecting the ribbon cable to the IDE drive, make sure
the PIN 1, the marked side of the ribbon goes near the power
connector. On the mother board, the marked of the ribbon
connector goes into PIN 1. The connector should be keyed
to only fit one way, but don't count on it.

Hope this get you started,

Martin

BTW please rate my answers.

Jun 14, 2008 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Motherboard fails to see Hard Drive...please help


Sounds like you lost an ide channel, swap the ide cables around, primary to secondary and secondary to primary. and see if it recognizes the hard drives and not the cdrom.

I lost an IDE channel and had to install a sata hard drive or run the hard drive and cdrom on the same ribbon. If you run HD and CDROM on same ribbon set both to CS (cable select)

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