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Electricity cost per hour

How much does 1500w/5118 btu cost an hour? I am using a space heater to help heat up a room when I am cold. But would it be cheaper to warm up with running the heater on my home or using the space heater in a room?

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1500w / 1000w = 1.5 kwh. Every hour you run (assuming it is at 100% peak power) you use 1.5 kw. Just multiply that rate by how much it your power company charges per kwh.

Estimating high at 10 cents per kwh it would be $1 for every 10 hours you run the heater, or $2.40 per day, or about $72 per month if you ran it 24/7 for 30 days.

It is FAR cheaper to use these types heaters to heat one small room than an entire apartment or house if you are only in one room the majority of the time.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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My daughter has just been provided with this heater by her landlord as the landlord didn't want to spend money on a new gas fire. Will it be expensive to run?


In theory Lesley, it will take the same amount of btu's to heat a given space at a given temperature comfortably whether it is getting the btu's from gas burning or consuming electricity.

The cool thing, is that with electricity, there is no wasted heat going up the chimney like there is with any fossil fueled furnace. I personally prefer gas or LP to electric, but there are benefits to both.

Either will be expensive with todays fuel costs and ultimately should be comparablr to one another.

Sep 29, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

How to heat a garage or workshop




Two things to consider in buying a space heater - the require BTU and the electricla cost to heat your space.


You can go here to calculate your estimated BTU need - http://www.calculator.net/btu-calculator.html
or just look up "BTU calculator' on line and there are other BTU calculators as well.

The BTU is what is pretty much required to effectively and efficiently heat to the temperature range you are comfortable with. It's a matter of the maximum degrees you want to raise the temperature. In my case I wanted to be able to increase the ambient temperature in my woodworking workshop from 40 degrees to 65 degrees and I have less than favorable insulation in this workshop, so my desired BTU is 16,359 at 4,794 watts. This heater meets that demand quite nicely.

As for cost, as I mention in the video (link above) the two ceramic space heaters were costing me about $1.56 per evening to heat my workshop. This heater is costing me only about 92 cents for the same length of time. I have immediate savings of over 62 cents per evening of use! Why the huge difference? Because the other two space heaters had to run continuously at combined 3,000 watts for 2 hours to heat the space and then continuously to maintain the desired temperature. The Dr Heater DR966 bring s my workshop from 40 to 60-65 degree in a half hour at 6,000 watts and then only runs intermittently at 3,000 watts to maintain that temperature. Therefore I am using less electricity to heat my shop to 65 degrees and to maintain that temperature.

I have my heater connected to a 30amp circuit breaker and have had no issues with the electrical demand of the heater tripping the breaker. But I am also using a six-foot long 6-gauge cord from the heater to the outlet and 8-gauge wire from the outlet to the breaker and the outlet is mounted directly underneath the sub-panel, so there virtually no distance from the breaker to the six-foot cord.

If the BTU supply of this heater meets your BTU demands I recommend that you get this heater and see for yourself what it's like to have a well heated work space. It's nice!
Here's a link to view the heater I used.

http://astore.amazon.com/wwwdogwoodtal-20

on Jan 28, 2016 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

Radiant Electric Floor Heating does not Save Money


There are many great selling points for electric under floor heating. The radiant design of the electric heating system is a great idea. It is easy to install which is very appealing.. You will be warm and feel great on nice warm floors. There are so many things to like about this type of heat. So what is the drawback to it?

One of the latest fads in under floor or radiant electric heating is the continued development of electric radiant heating. This heating comes in many different forms and can be installed easily and at what seems to be a reasonable cost. However before you get stuck with a heating system in your home or business make sure that you take a good look at what it will cost you to heat with electric.

Electricity will only ever make 3,415 BTU’s of heat from one kilowatt of electric. This is something that cannot be changed. No matter what you do to electricity it will always produce the same BTU’s per KW. So for this reason you can change the effect of the heat coming from the electric, but you can’t change the fact that you still need a certain number of BTU’s from the electric to feel warm. These BTU’s cost money. Oh and did I mention that of the electricity that is produce by most power plants, only about 1/3 of the electric makes to your home? This fact alone should make you not want to use more electric.

The price that the electric will cost you is the problem. There is nothing efficient about electric heating. Electric is expensive now and it will be going higher as more states deregulate electricity. Now electric radiant heat is probably the best way to heat with electric because of the radiant feature you will be able to “feel” warm at lower air temperatures. That will save you money. However the cost of the electricity to get the heat to that point will still have you wondering why you ever installed that system.

Under floor radiant electric heating is a very good heat and there are ways such as hydronic heating systems that use warm water to make your floor nice and warm. Today’s high efficiency boilers will give you a nice heat from LP gas or natural gas at near 100% efficiency. If you are looking to heat a very large space with radiant heat make sure that you compare all of the ways to produce radiant heat.

If you do decide to go with electric under floor heating then here are a few suggestions. Insulate your house like you were living on the moon with the ultimate in temperature extremes. The money you will spend on extra insulation will pay back many tomes over if you use electric to heat with. Use electric if you are only using the house for seasonal use and you want a heating system that is easy to maintain. Another good way to use it is if you only want radiant floor heating for a small part of your house like the bathroom.

on Dec 25, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

What does economy button mean? When it is not on economy it goes above the desired temperature setting but when it is on economy it never reaches the desired setting. Can you help??? Do others have th


According to the owners manual, the "Economy" mode is designed to reduce the temperature setting by 2 degrees every hour. May not be what you were expecting... On the too hot issue: Check the thermostat setting - it can read either Celsius or Farenheit - Make sure you are setting it to what you think you are... Recommendation: if it is heating higher than set temperature is 1) set the temp lower and see how it does or 2) call a repair man to check and calibrate the thermostat.

Jan 15, 2015 | Rinnai RHFE-1004FA 38,400 BTU Energy Saver...

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Im in a cold climate i need to put a tile floor that needs to be glued.i need a good way to heat coccrete floor so glue will dry properly is there any heaters for this? The building doesnt have heat and...


You will need to rent or buy a space heater, gas or propane that puts out enough BTU's for the size room you are heating and just run it to keep the room up to temp. for as long as it takes.

Jan 13, 2015 | Building Materials

1 Answer

Underfloor heating not working


Along with warming up the entire area, people also look to warm up the floor, which can otherwise be harshly cold. Underfloor heating sdystem is the most consistent form as it evenly warms up the complete open space. Infrared Heater Room Heater IR Heater Magneto

Jan 26, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Using as heater and unit is blowing cold air


A heat pump is an air conditioner that reverses its refrigerant flow. In the cooling mode, the evaporator is cold to the room and its condenser is hot. In the heating mode, a valve reverses the refrigerant flow and makes the evaporator warm and the condenser cold.

Nov 24, 2013 | Soleus 10,000 Btu Portable Ac Air...

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How do i get even heat thru out the house with a daka wood stove


http://www.hearth.com/talk/categories/main-hearth-forums.4/
You burn wood, and smoke goes up flueway.
You're not running chimney smoke through ductwork so you have a heat exchanger.
What kind of heat exchanger?
probably air since you're running through ductwork?
How much hot air or hot water is coming off heat exchanger?
How big of a space can be heated with that amount of heat?
Is the exchanger located in optimal location?

Considerations.
One room log cabin with fireplace will not stay very warm.
One room house with big wood burning stove in center, with hot flue pipe running across the room and exiting on far wall, will get warm-hot, but will cool off fast.
Why?
Because the BTU output of firewood is much less than electric, coal, oil, or gas.
Otherwise they would have made wood-burning steam locomotives. But the locomotive boiler cannot get hot enough with wood ... the boiler needs coal to produce enough BTUs to boil water fast enough to rotate the turbine and turn the wheels.

Maybe your wood stove output should be measured.
Don't forget a huge percentage of fire heat goes straight up flueway.

Mar 16, 2013 | Lux Tx500 Series Smart Temp Electronic...

1 Answer

Will the patton electric heater significantly raise my electric bill


1500 watts is 1.5 kilowatts. Run it for 1 hour and you have 1.5 kilowatt hours. My electricity costs .08 per kilowatt hour so, when I run my 1500 watt space heater, it costs me a whopping .12 per hour to operate. I can afford 12 cents per hour, compared to oil at $3.50 per gallon and a burner that burns up to 3 gallons per hour.

Dec 23, 2012 | Patton Electric Patton PUH680-U Electric...

1 Answer

How do you calculate how much free air is required for a 50,000 btu wall heater


Calculate the Cubic Footage of the area to be heated (i,e. Total confined space square footage x ceiling height = Cubic Footage). So let's say the total cubic footage is 3.808. To be considered unconfined space in this example, the total maximum aggregate input rating of all gas-fired appliances installed in the 3,808 cu. ft. space must not exceed 76,160 BTU per hour; (3,808 divided by 50) x 1,000 equals 76,160 BTU per hour.

Normal air infiltration into a confined space will be adequate to supply the necessary fresh air for proper combustion and ventilation if the building is not constructed unusually tight. If it is tightly constructed, some type of fresh air intake should be installed. Being that this 50,000 Btu wall heater is required to be vented to the outside, you can figure that up to 20 to 25% of the heat produced is going up the stack or chimney. That leaves you with a total of 37,500 Btu's dedicated to heating the building.

Placement of the wall heater can be critical in even heat distribution. Of course, it will always be warmer closer to the heater.

I hope this helped answer your question. Thanks for choosing FixYa.

Aug 12, 2011 | Fedders Heating & Cooling

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