Question about RCA D52W20 52" Rear Projection HDTV-Ready Television

1 Answer

Channel banner burned into display

From watching a particular channel for extended times, an image has burned into something in the picture making parts of the tv. can anybody tell me what it is and what the part number is. This is an RCA rear projection tv : model HD56W58 (YX1) chassis # APC321

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 1,199 Answers

All three color lenses may need replaced and if thats the case you might want to consider buying another tv

Posted on Dec 11, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

PICTURE STUCK ON ONE CHANNEL, GHOST CHANNEL OVER THE TOP OF THAT AS YOU CHANGE CHANNELS...STILL SEEING THE CHANNEL THAT IS STUCK IN ONE PLACE... 55 INCH HATACHI ULTRA VISION....


This is called image burn, or image retention. There is no cure for this. The image has been burned into your picture tubes from having the same image tuned in for too long.

May 23, 2011 | Hitachi 57S715 57" Rear Projection HDTV

1 Answer

I have sony 50E200A,there is problem with colour combination/mixing....green colour is too bright.please tell me how to resolve this problem.thanks


You need to calibrate the colors

The first step in calibrating your television lies in paying attention to your surroundings. Sit in the same spot you'd normally sit in to watch your TV. Then, make sure the lighting is at the same level you'll be using to watch movies: setting your TV to overcompensate for a brightly-lit room may give you distorted results. Watching in complete darkness may cause undue eyestrain, but a dim, diffuse light behind or to the side of your LCD TV is best. Just make sure to avoid any glare or reflection on the screen.

Next, be sure your display has "warmed up" for at least a half hour before attempting any calibration; this is to ensure that all the components of the display are at normal operating temperature and best approximate normal viewing conditions. You can take this time to familiarize yourself with the various display controls on your particular TV--get the manual out if you have to. The better you know which controls are available on your LCD TV, the better your end results will be. Though different manufacturers give different names to the controls, these are the levels you'll be adjusting:

  1. Black Level, normally found on the Brightness control
  2. White Level, usually called Contrast or Picture
  3. Sharpness, or sometimes Detail
  4. Color Saturation, usually labeled Color, or maybe Chroma
  5. Color Tint, also known as Hue

Beyond these basic settings, many modern TVs come packed with so-called "picture enhancements" which in reality do nothing but spoil an otherwise accurate, lifelike picture. Take a moment to dig through your TVs menus and disable any of these "features." What you're looking for is anything labeled edge enhancement or detail enhancement, flesh tone or color "correction," etc. This is a broad generalization, but basically anything not listed in the five controls above can be safely turned off. Another thing to check for is often called a "Picture Mode," or something similar: in reviews, we often find best results from a Movie or Cinema mode, which usually gives the most accurate picture with the least "enhancement." A Normal mode is a safe bet when this isn't available, but definitely avoid anything called Vivid, Dynamic, or Sports mode.Sports mode may make the grass look nice and green, but unless you're watching The Masters, it's probably not that green in real life; Sports mode is just ruining the color.

On a similar note, have a look at the options available for your LCD TV's backlight settings. Like many of the settings, the backlight is probably set to its highest brightness, which is probably too bright for comfortable extended viewing, and shortens the lifespan of your LCD TV as well. Drop this setting down at least to it's "normal" value, or even try out the Low Power or Power Saver option if it's available (in dimly lit rooms).Finally, a word about Color Temperature. Without getting into the rather complicated science behind it all, Color Temperature basically refers to the peak wavelength of a light source, which affects the color tint given to images which should be "pure" white. Suffice it to say that while most video is produced to what's called a "6500K Standard," (6500 degrees Kelvin), not every TV comes out of the box set to display that standard properly. In fact, factory settings are very rarely are set close to 6500K.

Dec 12, 2010 | Sony Projection Televisions

1 Answer

The television picture screen goes blank after a couple minutes of watching--leaving only the cable channel banner showing at the bottom. "Lamp" light comes on. Is this a television problem?


After trying tips on the web involving resetting the lamp life counter and toggling a switch inside the access panel with no results, I replaced the lamp. It now works.

Jan 06, 2010 | Samsung HL-P5063W 50" Rear Projection HDTV

1 Answer

Will ps3 hurt philips projection hdtv


Everyone is right. The manuals for both projection TVs and video games specifically warn against playing video games on these sets. The result can be "pattern burn" from parts of the image that stay in one place for extended times. Once the face of a tube is burned by a bright image, it's visible all the time. If you intend to watch this TV, don't play games on it!

Mar 16, 2009 | Philips 60PP9202 60" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Samsung tv


Hey tj1217,

The most common problem that may occur when you connect a video game console to a TV (especially front and rear-projection models) is a condition that is often called "image burn" or "image retention." This typically happens if the same image is left on the screen for a prolonged period of time, like when playing a video game that has many stationary images or if the game is left on pause for an extended period. In some cases, this may even be caused by test patterns, on-screen programming menus, or picture-in-picture boxes.

Before connecting your Nintendo Wii, I would first suggest checking the owner's manual for the TV itself to see if Samsung has any warnings or disclaimers against doing so. If you are unable to find your owner's manual or are unsure of what to do next, you may always contact Samsung directly for more information.

Should you choose to connect the Wii based on the manufacturer's suggestions/warnings, keep in mind that you can usually avoid issues like image burn by taking simple precautions such as turning the TV off when taking a break. The less time that the same images (or backgrounds) are displayed on the screen, the lower the risk is of image burn occurring.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 18, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

RCA P50830BL 50 in.


This is burn in on your set. Something that had those words set on your set for too long. There is no solution to this problem replacing the CRTs would not be cost effective...make sure you do not leave any still images on your tv for extended amounts of time.

Feb 04, 2008 | RCA P50830BL 50" Rear Projection...

3 Answers

Viewing HDTV on a Sony 53" KP-53HS30


This TV is a projector - not a plasma. I can't see how you would get "burn in" on this set. It should handle an HD picture fine.

Jan 06, 2008 | Sony KP-53HS30 53" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Image retention


most manufactures say not to have a still image on the screen for more than 15% of your viewing time. to fix this you will have to replace the optical assy. i did come across a sony projection where the burn in was actually on the screens themselves. the only thing you can try is to put an all white video pattern on your tv for at least 48 hrs.

Oct 06, 2007 | Sony KDS-R60XBR1 60" Projection HDTV

1 Answer

Red Tint on Hitachi 51F510


sounds like image burn,try it on normal viewing size and see if its still there and in the same area if so image burn on crt from the 4:3 aspect mode .

Aug 16, 2007 | Hitachi 51F510 51" Rear Projection...

Not finding what you are looking for?
RCA D52W20 52" Rear Projection HDTV-Ready Television Logo

Related Topics:

51 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top RCA Projection Televisions Experts

The Wyzzyrd

Level 2 Expert

83 Answers

D. E. Hev

Level 3 Expert

1059 Answers

Ron Dufek
Ron Dufek

Level 3 Expert

398 Answers

Are you a RCA Projection Television Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...