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My computer is telling me that the Windows folder is using 47.36GB but when I go into the folder and select all the folders and files (including hidden folders) the size is only 32.6GB. Where are the others?

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They are not reconmended to view but to view open my computer then C: drive- tools- folder options- view (its a tap) scroll down and unclick hide protected operating system files

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How do I get two screens to appear for transferring files on my computer?


I assume you are talking about Windows on a PC. You can open up multiple windows explorer windows by using selecting Computer from the Start menu. Navigate to the first folder that you want to transfer the files from. Next, select Computer again from the Start menu and navigate to the second folder where you want to transfer the files to. Drag and drop from folder one to folder two. Woila!

Mar 17, 2015 | Cell Phones

Tip

Show Hidden Files and Folders_1


1. Normal Configuration (setting)
Most of us know how to set the Show Hidden Files from the Windows Explorer but if in case this tweak doesn't work we need to do something more important in the Registry or using Command Prompt. For beginners i also include how to set the Show Hidden Files in the Windows Explorer.
Step 1. Open Windows Explorer (eg. My Computer) and click on the Tools Menu as shown in below.
e20e6e6.jpg


Step 2. Click on the Folder Options, you’ll see a toolbox (as shown below) :
8375c05.jpg


Now click on the View Tab


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Step 3. Check (select) the Show Hidden Files and Folders


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Step 4. Apply and then OK
If this doesn’t workfollow then include the Step 5
Step 5. Scroll down the Folder Options toolbox and uncheck the “Hide protected operating system files(Recommended)


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A warning dialog box will pop up, Click Yes

c2b38b3.jpg
And then Apply – Ok

Even after you’re done all these changes and you can't still see the hidden files and folders, then go to next tip: Show Hidden Files and Folders_2

on May 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cannot create folder


Use Windows Explorer to open the folder in which you wish to create the new folder.
The "My Documents" folder is a good choice if you are new to Windows.
2
Look at the left side of the Explorer Window for an area marked "File and Folder Tasks."
Click on the link that says "Make a new folder."

3
Click on "File" on the menu bar to begin creating a new folder in a different way.
Select the "New" menu item and click on the "Folder" submenu item.

4
Move the mouse cursor to a blank area of the folder area and right click to bring up the context menu to begin creating a new folder in a third way.
Select "New" and click on the "Folder" submenu item.

5
Utilize a fourth method to create a folder directly on the desktop.
Right click on a blank area of the desktop.
Select "New" and click on the "Folder" submenu item.

6
Type a name for the new folder in the highlighted area after using any of the methods described in Steps 2 through 4.
Press the "Enter" key or click in a blank area of the folder window to complete the process.
also you might just open your drive right click inside select new folder and name it.

Restore Folder Options in Windows XP
Windows XP has several viewing options that you can modify for folders in Windows Explorer. These include being able to customize whether you activate items by clicking them once or twice, whether Windows displays hidden and protected files and several other options.
If you have played with these options in an attempt to determine how you prefer to use your computer, you may accidentally reach the point where you have changed so many items that you are unsure of how to revert to the original configuration.
For this reason, Windows XP allows you to restore the folder options to their defaults by clicking a button.
Open Windows Explorer.
Two of the fastest ways to do this are by clicking the "Start" button and then clicking "My Computer" and by double clicking the "My Computer" icon on the desktop.
Click the "Tools" drop-down menu and select "Folder Options."

Click the "General" tab, and then click the "Restore Defaults" button if you would like to restore the default settings for the "Common Tasks" bar on the left side of folders, whether new folders open in the same window or a new window and whether items open with a single click or double click.
Click the "View" tab, and then click the "Restore Defaults" button if you would like to restore any advanced view settings to their defaults, such as whether Windows displays hidden and protected files.
Click the "Reset All Folders" button if you would like to restore the default viewing option to all folders, such as the detailed view or list view.
Click "OK" to save your changes.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/812003

Aug 14, 2013 | Western Digital Passport Computers &...

1 Answer

Wd my passport retrieve data


Step 1:
You might not have the appropriate software installed on your computer to show / read the files
IE: adobe flash , directx , win zip , codec , word ...... Determine if access is denied by a sharing violation because the folder and its files are in use by someone else or the computer itself. Wait several minutes, and then attempt to access the folder again. Go to the location where the file or its folder are stored on your computer. Lock files are hidden files in Microsoft Windows. Select "Show hidden files." The lock files for Windows applications have a ~ symbol in front of the file name. For example, for test.txt, the lock file is named ~test.txt. In UNIX, the lock file may be identified by an extension of .lock or .swp within in the file name. Delete the lock file. The locked file or folder unlocks. Reboot your computer, and bring it up in Safe Mode. This prevents the startup of many of the system services and programs that could be locking the files or folders. Attempt to access the folder location and its contents. If the folder is available, save the folder or its contents in a directory to which you have access. Record the active processes running on the computer and the programs available in Safe Mode. Then, log into the computer after a normal boot up. Review the applications running in the background in normal setup. One of these applications may be preventing access to the file folder and its contents. If there are applications that run in normal mode that do not run in Safe Mode, turn off those applications. Then, try to access the file folder again. b> Are the Security Permissions for the Folder or Its Contents Preventing Access? b> Check the file folder permissions by right-clicking on the folder and selecting "Properties." In the "Properties" dialog box, select the "Security" tab. The "Name" list box includes the user and group permissions. If there is no "read," "read and execute," or "write" permissions in your user profile, you do not have permission to view the file folder or its contents. These security permissions are typically set by system administrators. System administrators may be trying to prevent end users from altering system files that are critical to the computer running smoothly. Contact your system administrator, and request local administrative rights to the computer. This allows you to gain access to the files and folders that are restricted to administrators. Edit the system policies using administrative tools via the gpedit.msc program. Users can add, read and modify permissions for folders and other objects via this program. Full control is the best system policy, because it includes read, write, execute and modify rights. However, access to the gpedit.msc program may be restricted, as well. Go to the command line (press on the "Windows" and the "R" keys on your keyboard at the same time), and enter the CACLS command for the folder name. Use the command format: C:\> cacls <foldername> /E /G <username>:F CALCS stands for Change the Access Control ListS. This command allows you to add your user name to the security settings to permit access to the protected system folder when the gpedit.msc program is not available.

Downloads to Recover Your Files and Save Your Bacon and 10 Best Free Hard Drive Utilities. Some addition links found on Google
http://www.datarecoveryreview.net/

http://www.cleverfiles.com/

http://www.easeus.com/resource/hard-disk-data-recovery.htm

Feb 08, 2013 | Western Digital 1TB My Passport Essential...

1 Answer

Iomega 1tb drive have files hidden


You might not have the appropriate software installed on your computer to show / read the files
IE: adobe flash , directx , win zip , codec , word ......
Determine if access is denied by a sharing violation because the folder and its files are in use by someone else or the computer itself. Wait several minutes, and then attempt to access the folder again. Go to the location where the file or its folder are stored on your computer. Lock files are hidden files in Microsoft Windows. Select "Show hidden files." The lock files for Windows applications have a ~ symbol in front of the file name. For example, for test.txt, the lock file is named ~test.txt. In UNIX, the lock file may be identified by an extension of .lock or .swp within in the file name. Delete the lock file. The locked file or folder unlocks. Reboot your computer, and bring it up in Safe Mode. This prevents the startup of many of the system services and programs that could be locking the files or folders. Attempt to access the folder location and its contents. If the folder is available, save the folder or its contents in a directory to which you have access. Record the active processes running on the computer and the programs available in Safe Mode. Then, log into the computer after a normal boot up. Review the applications running in the background in normal setup. One of these applications may be preventing access to the file folder and its contents. If there are applications that run in normal mode that do not run in Safe Mode, turn off those applications. Then, try to access the file folder again. b> Are the Security Permissions for the Folder or Its Contents Preventing Access? b> Check the file folder permissions by right-clicking on the folder and selecting "Properties." In the "Properties" dialog box, select the "Security" tab. The "Name" list box includes the user and group permissions. If there is no "read," "read and execute," or "write" permissions in your user profile, you do not have permission to view the file folder or its contents. These security permissions are typically set by system administrators. System administrators may be trying to prevent end users from altering system files that are critical to the computer running smoothly. Contact your system administrator, and request local administrative rights to the computer. This allows you to gain access to the files and folders that are restricted to administrators. Edit the system policies using administrative tools via the gpedit.msc program. Users can add, read and modify permissions for folders and other objects via this program. Full control is the best system policy, because it includes read, write, execute and modify rights. However, access to the gpedit.msc program may be restricted, as well. Go to the command line (press on the "Windows" and the "R" keys on your keyboard at the same time), and enter the CACLS command for the folder name. Use the command format: C:\> cacls <foldername> /E /G <username>:F CALCS stands for Change the Access Control ListS. This command allows you to add your user name to the security settings to permit access to the protected system folder when the gpedit.msc program is not available. Hope this helps.

b>

Dec 10, 2012 | Iomega 1TB Prestige External USB 2.0 Hard...

2 Answers

I dropped and dragged some sizable folders from a desktop onto the Maxtor external drive. When I plug the drive into a different computer, I only see the files that I put on the drive a year ago on the...


Several things could be happening.
1. the hard drive direct drive motor is giving out.
2. the hard drive is full.
3. the hard drive needs to be optimized ( that is defragmented) using the Windows defragment utility. If the drive is large it will take some time to complete.

Jul 22, 2011 | Maxtor Hard Drive

2 Answers

I wish to download windows outlook express to my new computer. I would like to transfer all the data including email addresses from my office PC onto this new Toshiba laptop


  1. Open Outlook Explorer.
  2. Right-click on the Folder at the top of the left pane, and, from the context menu that appears, select Properties (see Figure 1 below). If you are using Outlook 6, you need to expand the Folders and right-click on the Inbox (see Figure 2 below).
  3. When you select the Properties option, you are presented with a dialog box with the location of the Outlook folders (see Figure 3 below). The full path is displayed as a label in Outlook 6 and as a text box under the Advanced tab in Outlook XP or 2000.
  4. Select the entire path from "C:\" to "\Outlook Express". Do not copy the filename given after "\Outlook Express." For example, if the path is C:\Documents and Settings\USER\Local Settings\Application Data\Identities\{B7ABE5FE}\Microsoft\Outlook Express\Inbox.dbx, you need only the C:\Documents and Settings\Arun\Local Settings\Application Data\Identities\{B7ABE5FE}\Microsoft\Outlook Express.
  5. Copy, paste, and save this path in a text file.
  6. Open a Windows Explorer window, and paste the path into the address bar and press Enter.
  7. Before proceeding to copy the folders to a CD or flash drive, you need to check if there are any hidden files or folders in the Outlook Express folder. To check this, check the Show Hidden Files and Folders in the View tab of the dialog box that you get when you select Folder Options in the Tools menu.
  8. The next step is to select all the files and folders in the Outlook folder. If you are using a version previous to Windows XP, you will need some CD burning software to copy the files to the CD. Otherwise, you can simply paste the files to the CD or flash drive. Do not forget to copy the text file containing the path in both cases.
  9. You now have all the emails, calendars, tasks, and other important things from Outlook, but you may also want to copy the address book. To copy the address book, use the Export option in the File menu of the Outlook Express. Once exported, use the method described above to copy it to the flash drive or to the CD. Now you are all set to move your Outlook messages to the new computer.
  10. Boot the new computer. Use the path you stored in the text file to open the Outlook Folder on the new computer. To do this, copy the path from the text file, open a Windows Explorer window, paste the path into the address bar, and hit Enter.
  11. Copy all the files from the CD or flash drive to the Outlook Express folder. When you are prompted to overwrite the files and folders, select Yes to All.

Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/computing/windows-platform/articles/45168.aspx#ixzz1FV6xRlBl

Mar 03, 2011 | Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64BIT...

1 Answer

How can i set up network file sharing


First step is to check if the file sharing option is checked in my computer folder options.

Start- My computer- TOOLS - FOLDER OPTIONS- and click on the second tab VIEW- scroll down to the last option which will show as USE SIMPLE FILE SHARING.

Level 1: My Documents (Private) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder has read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. All subfolders that are contained in a folder that is marked as private remain private unless you change the parent folder permissions.

If you are a Computer Administrator and create a user password for your account by using the User Accounts Control Panel tool, you are prompted to make your files and folder private.

Note The option to make a folder private (Level 1) is available only to a user account in its own My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 1, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 2 (Default): My Documents (Default) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder and local Computer Administrators have read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. This is the default setting for all the folders and files in each user's My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 2, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Make sure that both the Make this Folder Private and the Share this folder on the network check boxes are cleared, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 3: Files in shared documents available to local users loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared with users who log on to the computer locally. Local Computer Administrators can read, write, and delete the files in the Shared Documents folder. Restricted Users can only read the files in the Shared Documents folder. In Windows XP Professional, Power Users may also read, write, or delete any files in the Shared Documents Folder. The Power Users group is available only in Windows XP Professional. Remote users cannot access folders or files at Level 3. To allow remote users to access files, you must share them out on the network (Level 4 or 5).

To configure a file or a folder and all the files in it to Level 3, start Microsoft Windows Explorer, and then copy or move the file or folder to the Shared Documents folder under My Computer.

Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • Power Users: Change
  • Restricted Users: Read
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 4: Shared on the Network (Read-Only) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared for everyone to read on the network. All local users, including the Guest account, can read the files. But they cannot modify the contents. Any user can read and change your files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 4, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box
  3. Click to clear the Allow network users to change my files check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Read
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Read
Level 5: Shared on the network (Read and Write) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); This level is the most available and least secure access level. Any user (local or remote) can read, write, change, or delete a file in a folder shared at this access level. We recommend that this level be used only for a closed network that has a firewall configured. All local users including the Guest account can also read and modify the files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 5, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Change
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Full Control
Note All NTFS permissions that refer to Everyone include the Guest account.

All the levels that this article describes are mutually exclusive. Private folders (Level 1) cannot be shared unless they are no longer private. Shared folders (Level 4 and 5) cannot be made private until they are unshared.

If you create a folder in the Shared Documents folder (Level 3), share it on the network, and then allow network users to change your files (Level 5), the permissions for Level 5 are effective for the folder, the files in that folder, and the subfolders. The other files and folders in the Shared Documents folder remain configured at Level 3.

Jul 20, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

4 Answers

How can i view hidden files in windows xp?


Kindly follow the following steps to view your hidden files in your PC...

1. Double click & Open the 'Windows Explorer / My Computer'

2. From the file menu bar select 'Tools'

3. Select 'Folder Options'

4. Select the 'View' Tab on the Option Window

5. In that tab you will find 'Hidden Files & Folders' with a folder icon

6. Select the 'Show Hidden Files and Folders' by selecting the radio button.

7. Then select 'Apply'

Now you will be able to view the hidden files & folders in your system. I have enclosed the screen shots for your better reference.


ec7e812.jpg

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8097ecf.jpg

Jun 14, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2

3 Answers

I dont know what the heck is up with my computer. Previously, just yesterday in fact, I could access all my D: Drives Folder, but today, when I accidently dragged (lets name them folder a and b), Folder A...


This sounds a lot like something has taken over administrative rights to your computer, and limiting your access to your own folders. Try running Malwarebytes anti-malware to see if you have a trojan, rootkit or malware on your PC then try this program called unlocker1.8.7 to see if it will unlock the folder and give you permission to open it.

Apr 05, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

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