Question about Hotpoint RGB745 Gas Kitchen Range

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Oven element burning without being turned on

We smelled something and found the electric heating element red hot and burning without the oven dial turned on . do you think the element can be replaced to fix the problem ?

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  • Anonymous Dec 28, 2008

    My hotpoint oven won't turn off. What can we do to turn it off besides turn off the gas which makes the stove top inoperable?

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No the element, but the thermostat that turns it on, you see the thermostat works like a light switch on the wall for the house lights, it's what turns it on and off.

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

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Oven (indicator light) clicks on and off


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Nov 28, 2013 | Frigidaire FEF366 Electric Kitchen Range

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Magic Chef cgr3765adc, oven will not turn off. If the unit is plugged in the oven ignites and would continue heating unless disconnected from electricity.


follow this test and fix it. God bless you

Bake Element

If the oven won't turn on, check the bake element. The bake element is a black tube near the bottom of the oven about as thick as a pencil. When it is operating normally, the bake element will glow red hot. If the oven won't turn on the bake element may have burned out. It is often obvious to see where the bake element has shorted out because there will be a hole or break in the element. If the bake element has burnt out or shorted it should be replaced.





Oven Igniter

Even though the oven igniter may be glowing, it may be too weak to allow the gas valve to open. If the oven won't turn on and the oven igniter glows for more than 90 seconds without igniting the gas flame, the oven igniter should be replaced. This is the most common part that fails when the oven won't turn on.




Broil Element

If the oven won't turn on, check the broil element. The broil element is a black tube near the top of the oven about as thick as a pencil. When it is operating normally, the broil element will glow red hot. If the oven won't turn on the broil element may have burned out and caused something else to short out. It is often obvious to see where the broil element has burned out because there will be a hole in the element or blisters on the outside of the element. Test the broil element using an Ohm meter. If it has continuity it's OK. If not, it should be replaced.





Incoming Power Problem

Although not as common, if the oven won't turn on it is possible that the appliance is not receiving proper voltage. Electric ovens require 220 volts of alternating current. If for some reason the appliance is receiving significantly less, the oven won't turn on. Check for proper voltage using a volt meter at the socket where the appliance plugs in.


Oven Control Board

The oven control board has a set of relays that turn on and off power to the bake and broil circuits according to the customer settings and sensor input. If the oven won't turn on the problem is usually with the heating components. However, if the oven control board is bad, it might not send voltage to the heating components. To determine why the oven won't turn on, first test the simpler components in the circuit. The oven control board usually can't be tested and will have to be replaced if it is defective.





Thermal Fuse

Although not as common, if the oven won't turn on the thermal fuse may have blown. The thermal fuse is designed to protect the appliance and help to prevent a fire. If the oven gets too hot, this fuse trips. The thermal fuse is not resettable and will have to be replaced. It can be checked for continuity. If it has continuity, it's OK. Not all ovens have a thermal fuse.






Relay Board

If the oven won't turn on and the appliance is equipped with an oven relay board, one of the relays on the board may have failed. Normally the oven relays are located on the main clock control board and not on a separate oven relay board. If the oven won't turn on it is more likely that the cause is one of the more common problems listed for the model. If the other, more common problems have been checked and Your oven has a relay board, it may need to be replaced. Oven relay boards are not repairable.





Oven Thermostat

If the oven won't turn on, the oven thermostat might be defective. Although this is not as common as other components, the oven thermostat sometimes fails completely and does not allow current to pass through. After checking other, more common components, consider replacing the oven thermostat.





Heat Selector Switch

If the oven won't turn on, be sure the heat selector switch is set to the right position. The heat selector switch completes the circuit to either send voltage to the bake or broil circuit. If the oven won't turn on, the heat selector switch might also be defective, although this is not very common. The heat selector switch is not repairable, if it is defective it will need to be replaced.





Oven Safety Valve

The oven safety valve works with the oven igniter to provide gas to the burner. If the oven won't turn on it is possible that the oven safety valve is defective. However, this is very rare. Most often, the oven igniter is too weak to allow the oven safety valve to open. If the oven won't turn on, check the igniter first.





Oven Valve and Pressure Regulator

If the gas oven won't turn on the oven valve and pressure regulator might be at fault. This is not common. Very often people misdiagnose a defective oven valve and pressure regulator when the oven won't turn on However, this is almost never the cause. Look at other, more common components before replacing these.

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The bottom oven is heating up very slow.


If you are having problems with your electric oven heating up too slowly, not being able to maintain temperature set point, or wild variations in temperature, then you probably have a bad baking element in your oven.

The bake element is the bottom element in your oven. The life span of these elements can vary depending on the usage of your oven and the quality of the element. Anything electric has an unpredictable lifespan. Elements made on the same assembly line can vary greatly in how long they last. But when the element burns out it will need to be replaced to have your oven work properly.

The thing the fools many people is that many ovens will use the broil element to preheat the oven and then switch to using the baking element only. When this happens the oven will no longer heat and will cool down. The unit may sense this and activate the broil element again which will cause wild swings in temperature and also can cause food to burn on the top self or not bake properly.

If you can see the elements, watch them and see if they both get red hot when initially warming the oven. If only the top, broil element gets hot then you have a burned out element or a bad contacts where the element plugs into. Usually lifting the element and pulling out on it will release the element. If the contacts are discolored or pitted then they could be causing your problems. By using an ohm meter you can check the resistance of the element. If you get no continuity through the element it is no good.Bad elements will often have blisters, bubbles, or even burn in two.

If the element contacts are bad, make sure the you replace both the element and the receptacle that the element plugs into. Replacing only the element will only temporarily solve your problem.

Jan 23, 2011 | Maytag MER6772 Gemini Electric Kitchen...

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When oven is turned on it cuts off after a couple of minutes, smells like something is burning, and shows Fs on the LCD screen


sounds like your bake element is ready to burn out .or already has if its not getting red its out look at element for any abnomalitys like the coating should look the same from start an stop of element

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Oven not heating up but only broiler works heating element looks ok


Hi There
I have found some stuff for you to read and hope this will help you get you in the right direction.let me know how this goes.
It won't bake Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it. It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:" When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem. Thank you for writing to fix ya.
Best Regards Richard

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Broiler element won't heat. oven won't hold


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Bottom heating element in oven is not heating up.


If the element only works partially or not getting red hot at the "Hi" setting, the problem might be with a burned out receptacle that the element plugs into. If this is the case, replace both the element and the receptacle.

You can usually tell when the element itself burns out. It might have small holes or bubbles on the coil. Replace the element, if found defective.



Jun 10, 2009 | GE Spectra JBP78 Electric Kitchen Range

1 Answer

Oven not heating properly


Hello. You have done an excellent job of explaining your problem. Read over the info. below as it sounds like your top element is not working.

  • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

    You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

    If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.

    If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

    Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

    Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

    If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
  • May 26, 2009 | Kitchen Ranges

    1 Answer

    New Heating Element; Has Power But Not Heating Up


    Let's go over a few things: 
    • Your unit uses 220 volts to provide heating.  Some elements are wired to one of the two 'legs' of the 220 giving you 'low'.  High uses 220
    220 consists of three wires...two 'hot' (red and black) and a neutral which is white.  Neutral to hot will give you 110...hot to hot 220.  Measure accordingly and use care!  Neutral and the frame of the stove are effectively the same terminal...for safety.
    • You say some of the wires are burnt or a fuse is blown.  They need to be replaced with proper wire...not just any kind.  There is high temp insulated wire available from many ACE and other home stores or parts shops.  It needs to be thick enough, too.  Make all connections carefully and fully onto clean terminals.  Tighten clockwise.
    • Check the voltage coming to the element on various settings as above.  If you only get 110/120, you have an open supply issue which needs to be found.
    Look for: loose wires, corrosion, burned insulation to ground.

    Nov 19, 2008 | Belling CookCenter 151 Dual Fuel (Electric...

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