Question about PC Desktops

1 Answer

I broke the USB connector on my flash drive and I need to recover the data.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 86 Answers

The only answer here would be to carefully break open the device and attempt to repair the connections. Either with the original end or by pirating the end of a usb lead (leave enough fly lead to make connections to the device) Carefully note the wire connection order of the device in relation to the replacement part

Posted on Dec 09, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

It will not boot up stops when it say detecting storage device


Remove the hard drive and put it into an enclosure. Plug it into another computer as a slave. Then you can copy your files on it.
If it shows up in 'my computer' as a drive letter(like E: drive) but you can't access it, you can recover data from hard drive with data recovery program. Asoftech data recovery is a professional data recovery program that can recover data after deeply scanning your hard drive to look for lost data due to drives crash, physical damage, system sabotage, virus attack etc.

Sep 03, 2011 | Acer Aspire™ T180 PC Desktop

1 Answer

I had flash drive in my PC and it snapped off, leaving only the USB connector with 4 small prongs sticking out of the laptop. Can I recover this data. HELP!! Thank you.


Usb flash drive? its cut in half, can you tell me what kind of flash memory it is, do you know the brand and model that would help.

Jul 31, 2008 | PC Desktops

Tip

How to recover data from pen drive / memory card / hard disc /CD-ROM


Photorec is free way to recover lost data (formatted / corrupted) hard disks, CD-ROMs, memory cards (Compact Flash, Memory Stick, SecureDigital/SD, SmartMedia, Microdrive, MMC, etc.), USB memory drives, DD raw image, EnCase E01 image, etc. It ignores the file system, this way it works even if the file system is severely damaged.
You can download it from here.

on Apr 20, 2010 | PC Desktops

Tip

How to choose a backup device


Hello all,

I work in data recovery and I'm always being asked what kind of backup device my customers should use. The fact is, there are a lot of choices and a lot of different situations with different answers.

Whatever device you choose for backup, remember the most important part of backing up is to always have more than one copy. Your backup device does you little good if it holds the only copy of your files.

USB Flash drives:
Pro's Cons
Most Inexpensive Easy to damage
Easiest to Transport Easy to Lose
High Compatibility Difficult to recover
Fast copy speeds

External Hard Drives:

Pro's Cons
Inexpensive Some are bulky
Higher Capacity Greater damage if dropped
Easy to transport Can be expensive to recover
High Compatibility Some require external power
Faster Copy Speeds
Easier to recover
More rugged

Secondary Hard drive(internal)

Pro's Cons
Inexpensive Not optional on most laptops
Higher Capacity Not optional on all Desktops
Fully compatible Can fail simultaneously
Fastest Copy Speeds Does not protect data if PC Stolen
Easy to Recover Requires some knowledge to install
More Rugged
Less risk of damage

NAS Box or Small Server

Pro's Cons
Higher Capacity Higher Cost
Redundancy is Optional Requires more knowledge to setup
Accessible to all PC's
on your network at once
Fast Copy Speeds
Low risk of damage
Compatible with most PC


RAID5 NAS or Server

Pro's Cons
Highest Capacity Highest Cost
Highest Redundancy Requires most knowledge to Setup
Fastest Copy Times Requires specialized equipment or software
Accessible to all PC's Most expensive to recover if failed
on your network at once
Ability to survive single
drive failures without
data loss.


Now, armed with that short list of options, let's help you decide which option best suits you. If you move around a lot, you go to school, work out of the office or travel for work a USB flash drive is often the simplest form of backup and allows you to move data between home, office or school without lugging a large drive around. we recommend these as a part of most peoples backup solution. Next you will want a more stable form of backup(harder to damage).

For your tougher backup device you will have to decided what kind of budget you have, how much data will need to be backed up and how often. If you have a great deal of data from several computers in your home or office you will likely want to use a NAS box or setup extra drive(s) in one of your existing desktops to use as a server. If you only have one or two computers or the budget just won't cover a RAID or NAS solutions you can simply purchase an external USB or eSATA hard drive, usually less than $100. This can be moved between computers and used for backing up.

Now remember to Sync your data. This means anything you update or create while away that is saved on your USB flash needs to be copied into your computer and your computer needs to be backed up onto the external drive or server.
For more information on backing up, verifying backups and different types of backup devices, visit my blog at http://www.aitsavemyfiles.com/armor-itrecoveryblog.php or search through the other tips available here on FixYa.

on Mar 19, 2010 | PC Desktops

4 Answers

I have a Dell desktop that runs Windows Vista. When I try to get on the computer, it seems to load but when it gets to the black screen with the scrolling/ moving bar at the bottom. It doesn't leave...


first, recover your files. You will need to use something like this data recovery program.
http://www.asoftech.com/adr/

I've had to use it many times in the past but in this case you need to plug that drive into another system as an external drive or slave drive and run the software from there. It will rebuild the drive and hopefully recover the files.

After you get back your files, you can then format the drive and reinstall your system.

Jul 06, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

The part of my pen drive that goes in the computers usb port has just broke off and was still in the computer? can i retreive my data or can it be fixed?


The possibility of fixing a USB drive isn't good. The contacts that connect the USB connectors to the drive itself are very small and very hard to solder. (they are soldered by computer from the factory). I would by more worried about the USB port on the computer that it would still work after you pull the pieces of the connector out of that port.

Good luck.

Dec 04, 2008 | PC Desktops

6 Answers

My flash drive is faulty and i want to retrieve my data


dont panic, try this data recovery program called asoftech data recovery.
http://www.asoftech.com/adr/

I used the program before, it helped me recover my files from pen drive. If it does not work, you may try quick format the pen drive and then use asoftech data recovery program to recover again your files.

Oct 10, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I have a 10GB Philips 1" external hard drive. The wire that goes to the usb connector is broken, making the data inacessible. I took it to Best Buy to see if they could repair it, and they said no,...


if you can find or purchase another cable adapter just replace it. not worth fixing and might cause your external hard drive to crash if you get to fix the cable wrongly and will be spending more and losing both hard drive and cable

Jun 19, 2008 | PC Desktops

Not finding what you are looking for?
PC Desktops Logo

Related Topics:

33 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top PC Desktops Experts

joecoolvette
joecoolvette

Level 3 Expert

5660 Answers

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

Les Dickinson
Les Dickinson

Level 3 Expert

18297 Answers

Are you a PC Desktop Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...