Question about Canon EOS-20D Body only Digital Camera

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Keep getting ERROR 5. Dont know how to fix....also, cant increase shutter speed beyond 250. Not good enough for HS football action...

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Depending on the flash you are using, 250 may be as fast as you can go. That may be the limit for the internal flash. A big external flash can go faster because it requires more power.

Posted on Feb 04, 2009

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What setting is for sports


That depends on the sport, the location, and what you want the pictures to say to the viewer. You won't necessarily shoot a daytime football game outdoors the same way as a basketball game indoors.

In general you're going to want a fast shutter speed to freeze the action. To get the fastest shutter speed possible, use the Aperture Priority mode by turning the mode dial to "A" then select the largest aperture by using cursor-up/down to get the smallest f/number.

Having said that, sometimes you might want a slower shutter speed to convey a sense of motion. Select Shutter Priority by turning the mode dial to "S" and use cursor-up/down to select the desired shutter speed.

Feb 03, 2014 | FUJIFILM FinePix S4000 / S4050 Digital...

2 Answers

I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

1 Answer

What settings would I use taking low light action pictures


In general, taking action pictures is all about getting as much light in the camera as possible. In lieu of light, you can increase the camera's sensitivity to the light. This is called your ISO sensitivity and the higher the ISO, the more sensitive to light your camera is, and therefore they allow you to shoot with a faster shutter speed. The faster your shutter speed, the clearer your action pictures will be. In general, try a shutter speed of at least 1/250. Be warned: The higher your ISO, the more grainy your pictures may be, and if you have a consumer-end camera (point-and-shoot, or 4/3rds SLR) any higher than ISO 800 will most likely destroy the quality of your photos. If possible at all, try adding more light.

Hope this helped.

Chuck

May 06, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Evening My Canon 400D Eos SLR will not take photos in manual mode setting , goes through the motions of shutter open and close but when it comes to viewing the picture on the lcd display ( nothing there)....


Okay lets put some "joy" back into your photo's The reason you aren't getting anything is because your shutter speed is to fast. Your setting I think you are trying to say are F5.6 100 ISO and 1/100 shutter speed "M" manual setting. Actually if you looked closely on your "nothing there" there would be something. Anyway, Moon shots as simple as they look are anything but simple. The earth is moving and you are trying to take a still shot. I don't know where you are on this earth and every star system is different. Starting with a good solid tripod, next the lens needs to have a great enough focal length so the moon covers 2/3rds of the view (first shot) ISO 100 is good. In manual mode look at your light meter try to have your F-stop at F8 or F11 and adjust the shutter speed for proper exposure, you may need to adjust your aperture up or down once you have a "normal" exposure either increase your shutter speed or preferably stop down the lens two stops.
Your camera will meter down to 30 seconds if it goes below this then this is where you take your start (first shot) meter reading and count how many stops of light you require beyond 30 seconds.
For practice though attempt to stay within the 30 seconds by increasing the aperture but not wide open say F8 is as low as you go, need some speed adjust the ISO up to ISO 200 then ISO 400 don't go beyond this because other factors come into play at this point. the thing is you need to establish a metering point then stop down two stops and see what you have as far as exposure.

I know this may all sound really complicated but it's not the most important thing is to have a good tripod use F8 as your widest aperture don't increase beyond ISO 400 and keep your shutter speed at 30 second or above. Another problem that will occur is focus actually the lack of, your camera requires contrast to focus one you have established this shift the lens into manual and recompose your scene. What we aren't done yet don't touch the camera when your release the shutter. Use the 2 second time delay to give the camera time to stop vibrating after the shutter has bee depressed remove your hand DON'T touch it until the picture is finished. If it were me I'd be looking at doing a few landscapes at night to get use to all this stuff then tackle the moon so to speak. In the mean time here is a picture of The Fork Of the Thames in London Ontario Canada.
Picture here
tri3mast_162.jpg

Jan 14, 2011 | Canon EOS 450D Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do you take a picture of a fast movement?


It depends on the effect you want.
  • To freeze motion, you need either a fast shutter speed, or a fast flash in a dark environment. In less than bright light you may not be able to get a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action. Increasing the camera's sensitivity to light by increasing the ISO will help some.
  • You can blur the motion by using a slower shutter speed and a stable camera. Set a slow shutter speed and put the camera on a tripod or other stable surface, and you can get things like streaking car taillights and star trails. How slow a shutter speed depends on the speed of the subject.
  • You can pan with the subject. Move the camera with the subject, and keep it moving even while the display blanks out while taking the picture. This will keep the subject sharper while blurring the background to lend a sense of motion to the picture.
  • It's either to freeze motion if the subject is moving straight toward or away from you than if it's moving across your field of vision.

Sep 10, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry action pictures!


This Powershot A590 camera has a Kids and Pets mode that may help. If that doesn't work, you need to set your camera to Shutter Priority (TV) mode on the dial. Then you use the arrows to increase or decrease the shutter speed setting. Depending on the sport/action, your shutter may need to be 1/400 up to 1/1000 or higher.

You may find you don't have enough light to get a fast shutter speed at the standard ISO, so you may also need to increase the ISO. Only increase it as much as needed to get your shots, and don't forget to return it to a lower ISO when you are done. You set the ISO from the Func/Set button menu.

You will have a relatively shallow area of focus (called depth of field) unless you have a LOT of light and are using a relatively slower shutter (e.g. 1/400 vs 1/1000). So be sure to keep the center of the focus on the player you are shooting.

Check your user manual for instructions on how to change to the AV mode and how to set the ISO. If you don't have your user manual, you can download it here, from Canon.

Finally, this type of camera tends to have a lot of "shutter lag" between when you press the shutter and when it takes the photo. You need to plan ahead and press the shutter in advance of the "peak action" when you want to capture the photo.

Dec 17, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SX100 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutter Speed too slow on indoor sports for Nikon D60


Maybe. Assuming you can't add more light, you can either increase the ISO and/or open up the aperture. Try going to A (Aperture) mode and opening up the lens all the way. This will give you the fastest shutter speed possible under the conditions. That may or may not be fast enough.

Nov 02, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

D60 Shutter Speed


Yes. The question is how good they'll turn out.

You're right that it's because it's darker indoors. You can compensate for this at least in part by raising the ISO. This runs the risk of increased noise, but given the choice between a noisy pic and no pic...

A fast lens may get you a stop or two, but they're expen$ive.

A third option is to increase the amount of light. Multiple flashes around the basket, for example. Or floodlights mounted on the roof...

Oct 29, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Action pics with a long lens


What you are experiencing is not blur, its camera shake. You are shooting in low light so the shutter speed is being reduced by the camera's automatic features. Also the longer the lens (the farther you zoom), the higher the shutter speed you need. Even for non moving objects or when panning the shutter speed should be at least one stop above the focal length. ie - 300mm lens = 500 or 1000 shutter AT LEAST! (and don't forget, if its a film lens on your rebel, thats actually 300mm x 1.6 =480mm, so 1000 shutter or higher min.) Moving objects require even faster shutters. Solutions: Get faster (also called brighter) lenses which can be pricey. In low light use higher iso settings in the camera menu. Shoot in either manual or Tv mode and choose the higher shutter speeds while using the light meter to decide aperture. Use wider angle lenses or back off the zoom and move closer. Stabilizers built into the lens can steady the shot by two to four times as well.

Sep 14, 2007 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Mavica FD95 and Sports Photography.


Basically you bought the wrong camera for your needs. The 95 can not do well under the conditions you describe. The ISO is fixed and to low for the amount of light you have available. The viewfinder begins to darken after the lens is wide open and the shutter speed is increased further. There are three possible cures. More light, not possible in your situation, faster lens or higher ISO, again not possible with your camera. Maybe you could convince them to play in the dayight. :)

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Mavica MVC-FD95 Digital Camera

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