Question about Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard Heater, 3'

3 Answers

NO HEAT I am installing a noma 1000 watt heater. Controller is a line Noma line voltage double pole thermostat, wiring 12\2, breaker double 20\20. I am not getting heat. The red\black are from the breaker to line at each thermoatate terminal, load is again black\red from each terminal. At the heater I am getting 120 volts at each wire red and black. The black is connected to the black of the heater and the red to the white at the heater by wire nuts and the copper to ground. With the thermostat on I am getting no heat... I thought it might be a defective heater and exchanged it... the same problem. Any ideas? Thanks Wayne

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  • dogmanwayne Dec 09, 2008

    I am writing about a baseboard heater and got an answer about a hot water heater that does not address the problem.

  • dogmanwayne Dec 09, 2008

    When it did not work the first time, I put in a single pole thermostat also not luck. I have tried your suggestion I have 120 volts on each phase, I attached both the black and white respectively to the red and black from the breaker. No heat. I tried something different, I took one phase of the inline and attached it to the black from the heater, I than took the white to case ground and the heater started to get warm but that is only working from 120v and this is a 240 heater and should not need a neutral ground. I took a long lead and took it to ground at a j box and to the hot wire and I got a reading so It should not be a ground problem. Any ideas, Wayne

  • dogmanwayne Dec 09, 2008

    I know it is a strange one because I mounted a 2000 watt heater of the same brand with a single pole thermostat in my other house and it works fine. The heater in question is hot but not to what it should be and like I said it took a ground from the element to get it going. I may call Noma at their trouble line for thermostats and see what kind of a response I get. They don't seem to have one for the heater. Wayne

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This is a strange one!!!!!! you say you have had the heater replaced and still get the same problem?
It sounds very much to me the the model you have purchased may have a generic fault across the whole model range, unless you have an emergian switch elsewhere in the home which is not switched on

regards

Posted on Dec 09, 2008

  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson Dec 09, 2008

    Everything seems to be checking out fine, you have made all the correct connections via the wires and diagrams, the unit itself has got to be faulty
    Change it for a new one

    regards


  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson Dec 09, 2008

    This is typical of the manufacturers not to have any support for any problems that you may encounter, this is usually because they have bought the component from somewhere else (usually china) and cannot provide support for it, meaning you are stuck at the problem at hand!!!!
    get your money back and relpace the unit with a brand which will be able to offer you decent support

    regards


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HI
When an electric water heater fails to heat water, either the power to the water heater has been interrupted or there is a problem with the controls or the heating elements. 1) Be sure electricity is being delivered to the appliance. Check the main switch on the water heater and the circuit breaker (or fuse) that serves the water heater. 2) Check the high-temperature cutoff in the water heater. Open the panel, and push the reset button. 3) If these steps don?t solve the problem, call an appliance repairperson.

Posted on Dec 07, 2008

  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Dec 09, 2008

    Take care here - a defective circuit breaker can give a false 240 volt reading - check for the 240 volts across the upper element (i.e. when the 240 volts has a live load on it, not just an open circuit test).
    Also, remember, the upper element has priority over the lower element, and if the water is cold, the upper element will try to turn on and this locks out the lower element (only one element is allowed to heat at any given time). The lower element comes on ONLY after the upper thermostat is satisfied. Therefore if the upper heating element is burned out you will never get any hot water. If you suspect this, TURN OFF THE POWER TO THE HEATER and take a resistance check of the upper element.


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Have you tried just direct wiring the heater to your wires from the panel. Turn off breaker, wire up to heater, turn on breaker. If it works you are either wiring the thermostat wrong or the thermostat is defective.

Posted on Dec 07, 2008

  • Jay Glendenning
    Jay Glendenning Dec 08, 2008

    What have you determined?

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I have installed a Dimplex 1500watt heater. I used a double 15amp breaker and 14/2 wire (I know should've used 12 guage but changed plans post construction and was told 14 would be fine). There is...


A number 12 copper supply cable at the voltage is overkill for this load.

Ohm's Law states: Watts = Volts x Amps. To find Amps: Amps = Watts / Volts. This is 1500W / 240V = 6.25 Amps. Since the max continuous load for a 14 copper is 12 Amps, this size wire is the correct size.

Check to make sure the heater is in fact a 240 volt type, as if it is a 120 volt type, you are likely instantly burning out the heating element. If it is indeed a 120 volt heater, you will need to connect to a single pole 15 amp breaker and place the other wire that was on the breaker to neutral to provide the correct voltage. The load will still be 1500W, but at half the voltage, the current will double to 12.5 amps, and may cause the circuit breaker to trip after a while.

I hope this helps & good luck.

Sep 25, 2012 | Heaters

Tip

Thermostat Line Voltage How to Install or Replace


You either have a new line voltage thermostat or have to replace your old line voltage thermostat. In either case the process is much the same.

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  1. Make sure that all power is turned off at the breaker panel. Most heaters that use a line voltage thermostat usually use 240v current so the breaker will either be a double pole breaker or you will need to turn off two single pole breakers to kill all of the power.
  2. Check to see which wires are hooked to the breakers. In most cases it will be the red and black wires, but I have seen many times that the white and black wires were used. Often there is no red available when the white is used.
  3. Take out the two screws that hold the thermostat to the junction box. When you get the thermostat out make a note of which wires go to the heater (load) and which wires are coming from the breakers. (line)
  4. If you have a single pole thermostat installed one of the sets of wires may be wired straight through the box or have the line and load wires connected directly in the box. With a double pole t-stat you will have both sets of wires running through the t-stat.
  5. Remove the old thermostat and wire the new t-stat in the circuit with the load wires hooked to the load or heater and the line wires hooked to the wires coming from the breaker. Make sure to get a very good tight connection as resistance loads will heat up quickly if good contact is not made. This poor connection can and will start fires.
  6. Turn the power on and check the heater for heat output.
  7. Turn the power back off and carefully screw the thermostat to the junction box securely. Then you can reapply the power to the circuit.

Now you are up and running with a new line voltage thermostat installed.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3894275-manual_honeywell_find_honeywell_manuals

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623083-thermostat_wiring_terminal_designations

on Jan 16, 2010 | Heaters

1 Answer

I have a large room in my basement where I would like to install four Marly 58" baseboard heaters to work off one thermostat. The units are rated at 1250 watts each for a total of 5000watts. I plan to...


Using the equation I = P/E where "I" is Amps, "P" is Watts, and "E" is voltage, we find that your 5000w circuit will have an Amperage of 20.83. A 22 amp tstat will work, it will just leave you no room for surges. I would suggest splitting the baseboard and using 2 thermostats. Hope this helps

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I PURCHASED NOMA 1500 WATT BASEBOARD HEATER AND


I am haveing the same problem.........., the first 10 i installed no problems....... now the last one i am ..............did you have any luck

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1 Answer

Problem wiring 240amp baseboard heaters


12 gauge wire sounds under sized for the application. And 20 amp 240 v breakers might be sufficient if you where wiring the heaters separately. But be sure that your wiring is not romex - because romex is an insulator and is not permitted in conduit. I would suggest that you up size your wire to 10 guage and your breaker to 30 amp as well. Then double check your heater wiring connections to insure that they're wired the same throughout.

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Dimplex baseboard heater wiring


no does not matter but you must have a ground leg

Jan 05, 2009 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

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How to size a room for baseboard.


HERE YOU GO CALCULATE THE HEAT @ 10 WATTS PER SQUARE FOOT , TAKE THE LENGTH X WIDTH X 10 AND THIS WILL TELL YOU THE AMOUNT OF WATTAGE YOU NEED . MOST ALL BASEBOARD HEATERS ARE RATED @ 250 WATTS PER LEN FT AS TO SAY A EX. A 4FT HEATER IS 1000 WATTS , MOST OF THE THERMOSTATS ARE RATED @ 20 AMPS AS IS THE 12-2-WG WIRE TO RUN TO HEATERS AND THERMOSTAT DIVIDE THE TOTAL WATTAGE BY THE LINE VOLTAGE USUALLY 240VOLT IN US .AND THIS WILL TELL YOU THE CURRENT DRAW ----WHICH CANNOT EXCEED 20 AMPS ON 12-3-WG AND THAT IS THE LIMIT OF THE THERMOSTAT AS WELL THESE STATES APPLY 99% OF THE TIME I DO REALIZE THERE ARE EX BUT HAVE USED THESE FORMULAS FOR 35 YEARS OF DOING MY WORK AND THEY DO FINE

Dec 16, 2008 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

1 Answer

Heater is not heating up.


First, is this a 120 VAC or 240 VAC heater? 120 VAC heater will usually have one Black & one White wire and 240 VAC heater will usually have two Black wires or one Black & one Red wire. If it is a 120 VAC heater then you need to supply the white wire at the heater with a neutral (white) wire from the breaker panel. If it is a 240 VAC heater then you need to verify that you have 240 VAC at the heater from Black lead to Red lead. If you are not sure about how to do this please have an experienced electrician look at it so you don't get electrocuted and/or burn up your new heater. Hope this helps!

Dec 09, 2008 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

4 Answers

Properly installed electric baseboard heater won't work.


I am an electrician. You must measure the voltage across the black and red wires. Measuring each wire to the neutral will not cut it. If both your red and black wire are on the same phase the heater will not work.

To double check your wiring, measure the voltage across the two screws feeding your subpanel, they should be 240v or 208v depending on your power company. Then do the same at the breaker feeding your thermostat. Again it should read 240v.

If you have no potential across the screws it is possible that you installed an incorrect breaker. Not all breakers with two screws on them are 240v breakers. There is what is called a twin or split breaker that has two screws that are on the same phase. These are for wiring two 110v circuits, when you run out of spaces in the panel.

Double check everything. This is a relatively easy circuit to wire, even for homeowners. If the heater does not work them something is wrong so do not leave the circuit energized.

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