Question about Hasselblad 80mm f/2.8 CFE Lens

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Lens not stopping down

I just recieved the camera in the mail and am wondering why I am having the problem of not being able to adjust the shutter speed on the lens. As well as now that I have been playing with the camera the lens will not stop down past 5.6 either. The lens will adjust from a 2.8 to 5.6 but will go no further.

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Re: Lens not stopping down

Sometime it may happen, put the camera body without lens put it on the speed of b see when you klick the camera the shutter will go up and also mirror then the body is ok , put the lens sapratley you will see one small part is over the mount when you rotate it the lens appurture is opened and close u can put the f2.8 the ere is closure of appurture when you move the knob like wise u change the app and vise versa

Posted on Feb 12, 2007

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Zenzanon 80

The lens does not have a shutter - that's in the camera body. The lens contains the aperture or f stop adjustment. It is done by injecting or retracting blades in the light stream of the lens barrel between the front and rear optics. Check the aperture blades to see if they move easily and open equally by varying the f-stop ring on the lens while looking through it. If not moving all the blades the same amount or it does not continue to restrict the opening as you increase the f-stop value, there's something wrong with the lens.

Are you sure you haven't accidentally activated any exposure compensation adjustment on the camera body?

Jan 10, 2012 | Bronica 80mm f/2.8 Zenzanon-PS Lens

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I did not get any instructions with my Opteka. Have tried to take photos with it. But they came out all blank. I used a tripod. Would like to know where I can down load instructions. Certainly not as good...

You did not provide enough information to determine what your problem is. For example, were the pictures all light or all dark. Knowing this lens, I will assume that they were all dark. So...

1) This is a very, very slow manual-focus lens. It will not auto focus. It must be manually focused very precisely because it has virtually no depth of field.
2) Depending on your camera, your internal light meter may not work. On my camera (Nikon D-90), it does. If it does not on yours and I suspect that may be your problem, you're going to have to shoot everything manually, i.e. setting the shutter speed and lens opening yourself. You can use your internal light meter to help you get started by taking your light reading before you install the lens...preferably using the aperture only setting where you set the aperture at f8 which I think is the speed of the Opteka and let the camera set the shutter speed. Make a note of the shutter speed then attach the Opteka to the camera and mount the lens on a tripod with the camera attached.
Then set your camera mode to manual and set the aperture to match the lens (f8, I think). Set the shutter speed at the speed you noted earlier. Shoot a picture using a remote shutter release or the self timer. This lens is so slow that unless you're in exceptionally bright conditions you will get fuzzy pictures due to camera movement at full zoom of 1200m and above if you're using the 2X doubler. I would start shooting at minimum zoom of 650 without the 2X doubler. Shoot a picture. and check the result.

You should have an image but it may be too light or too dark.

If its too light you'll need to increase the shutter speed or stop down the aperture to, say, f11...or both. Make the adjustment and shoot another picture. Remember that if you increase the aperture, you increase your depth of field, making focus less critical. If you increase the shutter speed you make camera or subject movement less critical.

If it's too dark, you can only increase the shutter speed because you can't open the lens any wider than f8. Make the adjustment and shoot the picture.

Keep doing this until the pictures are the way you want them.

This is a decent lens for the price and worth the little money they cost if you can't afford $10,000 plus for a high quality telephoto lens of this size. I would forget about the 2X doubler because as others have said, it further reduces the speed of an already very slow lens with such a high rate of magnification that a knat landing on the lens could cause the picture to blur from movement.

Jun 26, 2011 | Opteka 650-2600mm High Definition...

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What are the best settings to use the Opteka 500MM Mirror Lens with a Pentax K-7. Also when you you add the 2.0X teleconverter with this lens?

These big lenses are very slow and cannot deliver much light to your camera. Obviously, you can't open the aperture any wider than f8 as specified by the lens itself. In the old days, most inexpensive cameras were fixed focus at f8 with a shutter speed of 1/100 sec. That's a good place to start with this lens without the doubler.

If the pictures are too dark, you can't open the lens any wider so your only option is to reduce the shutter speed.

That means that motion of the shooter or the subject will be more inclined to cause blurring so you need to be shooting from a tripod with a remote shutter release and/or a delayed shutter release setting.

If the test picture is too light, I would first reduce the lens opening to the next stop, f9 or f11, then shoot another test shot. You could also increase shutter speed, or both o reduce the light reaching the camera sensor. Keep shooting test shots until you get the exposure you want.

Once you add the doubler, you compound this situation because it will further reduce the lens speed by about 2 f-stops, meaning that you have to start your tests at f-11 at 1/100 sec. or f-11 at 1/50 sec. This gives you far less flexibility to properly adjust exposure.

Further, you will have increased the magnification so much that a slight breeze or a fly landing on the lens can cause vibration and blur the picture.

Before you shoot any serious pictures, you need to experiment with this lens so that you know exactly what its capability is.

Jun 23, 2011 | Opteka 500mm f8 for Pentax K

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The S and M modes on the black images when taking a pic; any idea why?

I'd say you're severely underexposing. The M mode is for manual exposure. This means you're responsible for setting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture. The aperture controls how much light passes through the lens, the shutter speed controls how long that light hits the sensor. The two of them have to be adjusted properly to suit the amount of light hitting the subject. If the lens doesn't admit enough light and/or the shutter is opened for too short an amount of time, not enough light gets to the sensor and you get a black image.

The S mode is for shutter priority. This lets you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the lens aperture for correct exposure. However, the lens has a maximum aperture beyond which it cannot open. If the shutter speed is too fast, again not enough light gets through the lens and you get a black image.

Since you didn't specify the model of your Nikon camera, I can't tell you exactly how to adjust the shutter speed and aperture. If you can't find the procedure in your manual, please feel free to reply to this post, specifying the model.

Feb 24, 2011 | Nikon Camera Lenses

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For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?

There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

1 Answer

I set this "Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor Lens" or tried to set it to F2.8 in full manual mode. the F-Stop wandered from F2.8 to F3 / F4.5 depending on where i pointed the lens. I...

You have described Aperture priority mode: you set the f/stop and the shutter speed changes to make the exposure correct.

Full manual mode requires you to set both the shutter speed and the f/stop. You are seeing the recommended f/stop for the shutter speed you have selected.

Sep 25, 2010 | Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR...

2 Answers

Took pictures of footbal scrimage during the middle of the day, half of pictures were over exposed, what settings should i have on my nikon d300?


Go to and go to the Customer Service tab and then Downloads and type in Sports Settings.

This will give you all the settings you should set your camera too.

A quick fix is to set your iso setting to Auto and this will adjust your exposure.

Hope that this helps



Aug 15, 2009 | Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8D VR G-AFS ED-IF Lens

2 Answers

500mm lens will not function with my Canon digital Rebel XT.

This lens will work with Canon cameras. I use one on my Canon 30D. It is a fixed F8 you can not use auto or green box because there are not any contacts on the lens to talk to the camera. Its back to the basics manual adjust shutter and ISO to the get a correct exposer. DEFINITLY NOT A POINT AND SHOOT LENS.

Dec 11, 2008 | Quantaray 500mm f/8.0 Mirror with Macro...

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Aperature ring

Hi, Is the aperture in max or min ?
Remove the lens. Try pushing the stop down lever and look through the lens if the aperture changes.
Look at this pic if you wonder what stop down lever means.


Sep 19, 2008 | Nikon Normal AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D...

2 Answers

Adjusting the f stop

Lock the aperture in F 22. This will get rid of FEE. Now control the aperture settings from the body ( control infront of shutter release )

Aug 07, 2007 | Quantaray 28-90mm f/3.5-5.6 for Pentax

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