Question about Marantz CDR510 2-Disc CD Recorder

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I cannot get the CDR510 to record from an external source. At first impression it appears that the analog line-in jacks don't work.

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Make sure you have the recorder source control turned up and the external device in the input or aux. be sure the external source is sending a signal and not padded or turned down

Posted on Feb 02, 2009

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1 Answer

Marantz CDR510 Display is blank


If that is the case there is a missing B+ line to the display, you will need a circuit diagram to find the fault.

Mar 13, 2012 | Marantz CDR510 2-Disc CD Recorder

1 Answer

I have a Sony JA3ES it want record in analog inputs.everything else works what would make this quit working.


I'll give you my best guess since I sold my JA3ES and am doing this from memory. Check your analog connector cables are good, be certain you have the input switch set to analog input.

Be certain you are not setting your inputs for the microphone jacks. If you are getting the error message din unlock the recorder is not getting the signal from the analog source.

It is possible to have damaged analog inputs on a used machine, but you have micorphone jacks and might get adaptor cables to hook your analog inputs in through the microphone jacks. Note this machine is old enough the microphones are 2 mono microphones left and right. If you want to use a modern stereo microphone you need an adaptor cable for that too.

If you try the above be careful as the mike jacks are really for mikes not what I mention, but it is a probable go around if your rear analog jacks are damaged for some reason.

Jan 11, 2012 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Have a technics SHGE70 and trying to hook it up to a sony STR-K660P. the receiver has a red and white rcs for dvd audio in and red and whitre video audio in. thats all the rca outlets it has. i unhooked...


I see an EQ and a Receiver with NO Tape Loops or external audio sources mentioned.

Are you implying this used to be hooked up and working? Or are you asking how to integrate the EQ NOW after a move?

Normally the receiver would have a defeatable external loop for Tape recording. THAT is where the EQ or any other processor would go.

The following is mostly boilerplate for receivers WITH a tape loop. You need to understand what will and will not work even if you could attach the EQ.

--- Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast. --


http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_TaoBB_L8lt0/TDi__0VSpoI/AAAAAAAAACc/uS9ODAazZi0/s1600/HPIM0718.JPG



If you wanted to Equalize a single external analog source you would have to connect the EQ Line output to either of the two analog inputs ("DVD" or "Video" in your case) and connect your external source to the Playback jacks on the EQ.


Mar 15, 2011 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

2 Answers

I have connected my phillips cdr785 recorder the proper way to record from an external source and I get the message "start source" on the cdr side when trying to record. And it never starts...


If you're recording an analog source the recorder won't automatically start. You have to start it in sync with the playback.

If you're trying a synchronized digital recording...

Page 28 of the manual says

Start playback on the selected source.


The CD recorder starts to record simultaneously and recording in progress is shown. The remaining recording time left of the CDR(W) is displayed.


Note: If you start playback on the selected source within a track, recording starts at the beginning of the next track or after 2.7 seconds of silence in analogue recordings.

Mar 05, 2011 | Philips CDR785 3-Disc CD Recorder

1 Answer

Need advice on how to use Advance Digital ADS Instant Music RDX-150


Assuming you have recording software on your machine already: (GoldWave, Audacity...)

Plug the USB cable into the back of the ADS and into the computer

Connect a line-level analog audio source (tape player, turntable, radio, amplifier, etc.) to the ADS using the appropriate cable to fit the source on the one end and has RCA connectors on the other - plug into the Audio In jacks (Red and White)

Ensure that the recording source on the computer is set to the appropriate USB port

Select record in the software and start the analog source playing

Note: If you are using a microphone, make sure it is amplified to line-level before using as a source.

Jan 22, 2011 | Advance Digital ADS Instant Music RDX-150...

1 Answer

No, i was looking for free advice


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In jacks; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out jacks.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 26, 2010 | JVC Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Dual microphone issue


drewad125

Technically you can not do this. Most sound cards only support one recording device at a time, especially notebooks. With notebooks usually when you plug in a device it will over ride the build in one.

Now some sound cards give you the option in turn all recording source at the same time so if you laptop would support both mics then you could use this option. The down side is you will be recording from ALL source so you will not want any other sounds going on that you do want in you recording. The steps below will help you check this.

***Note step 4 may not say Analog Mix but if it says mix then most likely you have the option to select all your recording sources.***

1. Click START / PROGRAMS / ACCESSORIES / ENTERTAINMENT / VOLUME CONTROL.
2. Click OPTIONS / PROPERTIES.
3. Select RECORDING beneath ADJUST VOLUME FOR.
4. Insert a check to the left of ANALOG MIX.
5. Click OK.
6. Insert an X beneath ANALOG MIX.
Everything being output via the speakers is now the recording source.

Another option is get a notebook card from Creative Labs as they make sound card. Now if you are doing highend recording you might also look at their highend EMU products as well. I included the links to both there sites.

http://us.store.creative.com/Sound-Blaster-XFi-Notebook/M/B001BS3A3E.htm

http://us.store.creative.com/category/25660134781/1/EMUCreative-Professional.htm

Let me know if you have any questions

Issken

Jan 12, 2010 | HP Pavilion dv4000 Notebook

1 Answer

Problem with analog recording on Yamaha CDR D651


Your assessment that it duplicates CD's internally fits with an analog-only failure mode. Let's make sure the signal is getting past your RCA jacks on the deck...

Put the deck in a Rec/Standby mode and make sure an analog source registers adequate volume on the meters. If it's good there and doesn't change with cable swapping between the input channels, you're right, the problem is internal. Maybe the volume potentiometer itself has developed a dead spot. Manually rotate it throughout its range many times to wipe it clean.

If you have an external optical digital source use it to check the meters in digital recording mode to be sure they're about even. The same knob affects analog and digital levels.

If you have the deck connected via the traditional Tape Monitor circuit in a receiver you should be able to tell by ear if the one channel is dead or too low. This puts all of the recording circuitry including the volume knob in line with your receiver.

May 16, 2009 | Yamaha CDR-D651 2-Disc CD Recorder

1 Answer

Converting Audio Cassettes to CDs


First off I assume you have the manual for you're 5700. if not a PDF copy is here
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/media/i3d/01/A/man-migrate/MANUAL000027911.pdf

Assuming you have a standalone tape deck that has phono inputs and outputs connection and recording recording should be easily achieved.
Forget the coaxial unless of course your tape deck has digital outputs.
Assuming it hasn't just connect the two output sockets from the tape dec which may be labelled REC out left and REC out right to the Line in (L) and Line (R) of the CD recorder.
The physical setup is now complete.
The increment level they refer to in the manual offers you a choice of 3 final decibel output levels in other words how loud it will be when it is finally recorded onto the disc.

the last paragraph on page 16 is relevant to the setup described above.

Page 15 of your manual is all you need to achieve tape transfer to CD.
follow the steps below and choose ANALOG the source to be played is your tape deck so once the process has begun press the play button on your tape deck and you should get a decent recording. Leave everything else at their default settings until you get a better understanding of how to tweak your recordings.
Personally I transfer audio tapes directly to my PC and Audio edit them until they are perfect but I've been doing this for years.

Good luck


here's a snippet

To record from an external source:
1. Turn power ON.
2. Place a recordable audio disc (CD-R or CD-RW) label side up
in TRAY II.
3. Close TRAY II. (When a blank disc is placed in TRAY II, the display
will show BLANK.)
4. Press INPUT until the source you want to record is selected.
DIGITAL OPTICAL:
record a source connected to the DIGITAL IN (OPTICAL) terminal.
DIGITAL COAXIAL:
record a source connected to the DIGITAL IN (COAXIAL) terminal.
ANALOG:
record a source connected to the analog LINE IN jacks.
5. Select the desired mode of track division (track number
assignment) by pressing the MANUAL/AUTO button (see the
ADVANCED RECORDING section for more information).
6. Press the RECORD button.
The unit enters record pause mode.
The PAUSE [ ] icon and REC blink on the display.
7. Press the PLAY (ENTER) [ ] button of TRAY II to start recording.
8. Play the source to be recorded.
• During digital recording, if the input signal stops for 5 seconds,
recording will stop.
• During analog recording, if the input signal stops for 20 seconds,
recording will stop.
• If the unit detects copy-prohibit signals during recording,
CAN’T COPY appears on the display and recording is stopped.
To stop recording: Press the STOP [] button
To temporarily pause recording: Press the PAUSE [ ] button.
Remember that every time recording is paused or stopped,
a new track number will be assigned.

Jan 11, 2009 | TDK DA-5700 CD Player

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