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How to add game port.

I have a spare gameport and two usb arrangement to add to the motherboard. I can see the usb pins but the game port needs 15 and I cant see where to attach this. Is it the FP marked on the manual which has 9 pins or can I not do this?
Thanks Adam

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  • adamsun Dec 04, 2008

    Thanks but I am already using three sound cards! I am creating a digital organ and wanted to add another midi port without a sound card, because only three can be supported.

    Adam

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The game ports are usuallyadded by adding a soundcard, not by directly connecting to the mobo. you need to find a soundcard which has a gameport included, or use usb game acessorries

Posted on Dec 04, 2008

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1 Answer

How to add usb 3 ports


USB 3 and 3.1 ports are supported by the chipset on motherboards. They will have a blue color to identify them.
see
GIGABYTE USB 3 0 Motherboards
You cannot add USB3 ports. No external usb extenders, multiplexers can help.

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Mouse 6 pin ps/2 port on back of HP Pavilion Media Center TV m7680n not working it is enabled in bios where can i buy one online i need mouse and keyboard ps/2 ports to go ...


You are using the correct terminology.
Ps2 mice are far and few between. Use a USB mouse, likewise keyboard and add a USB to PS2 adapter.

Mar 21, 2011 | HP PC Desktops

1 Answer

How do I connect the front usb wires to my fic c51g motherboard header?


How to Install Front USB by Connecting Front USB Ports to a Motherboard?In order to have front mounted USB you must have 3 things.
  1. A case with USB ports in the front of it.
  2. A motherboard that supports front USB (usually)
  3. Appropriate wiring between the USB port and the motherboard
A case can support front USB in two ways: via a pass thru connection, or via a port to header connection. The former, pass thru connection, is compatible with all motherboards that have USB ports. Pass thru front USB Pass thru front USB works by having the ports on the front of the case connect to either a standard USB cable, or a fairly small rounded cable. The cable goes from the front of the case to a special slot cover with either a hole (for the standard USB cable) or a special connector for the rounded cable. If the pass thru USB had a standard cable, then you would simply plug the standard cable into one of your back USB ports. If it had a rounded cable, then you have a secondary attachment with something that looks like an old style SCSI connector. The attachment plugs into both the slot cover, and the back USB ports. The draw back of pass thru front USB is that you lose the ports in the back.

Many 3rd party devices that add front USB to a system use the pass thru system. A good example is this now discontinued Front IO panel
directron_1721_2292726
Front USB via a Port to Header connection In order to hook up a Port to Header connection you have to make sure that the wires from your port will connect to your motherboard's header. To do this you need to know what header you have, and what type of connector you have on the wires. You'll find information on both below.

Almost all motherboards these days have a USB header. Due to size and cost restraints many motherboards only have 2 USB ports on their back panel, but often they can actually support more then 2 USB ports. They will typically support additional ports via the use of a USB header. A USB header is either a single or double row of header pins on the motherboard that can be used to add additional USB ports to a computer via the use of an appropriate set of header connectors, wires, and a USB port. Each pin on the header corresponds to a wire inside a USB cable. These pins must be clearly marked so that you can hook them up to the wiring correctly. There are 2 common layouts for a USB header.

Intel Standard USB header Layout: (used by over 90% of motherboards)

instusb1a.jpg

Gigabyte Style USB header Layout: (used most commonly on Gigabyte brand motherboards)

instusb2b

Now that we know the types of headers we have to take a moment to understand the USB wiring. Understanding the wires First off: All USB cables have 5 wires. 4 of these wires are actively used. Here's a reference from the official USB standard.

instusb3

On a front mounted USB port you'll have either the first 4 wires connected to properly colored wires (red for power, white/orange d-, green/yellow d+, black for ground) or all five wires attached to the port (same as the former, but one extra black wire). Now where it gets tricky is how to attach each of those wires to corresponding pins on the motherboard.

The wires are "tailed" (attached to a header connector) using any one of a number of different types of connectors. Below you'll find a list of the common ones.

Common USB case header connectors 4 joined pins + 1 extra ground.
usbheader

Compatibility: Compatible with both header arrangements because of the extra ground. May not work with some odd arrangements To hook up carefully match each pin. For the Intel hookup you'll have the extra ground wire not attached to anything. For the Gigabyte hookup you'll have the extra ground hooked to ground pin on the motherboard, and the standard ground jumper will be over the missing pin on the header.

All pins separated

instusb6

Compatibility: Compatible with every header. If all the pins are separated the only real issue is lining up the pins with the appropriate places on your header. It should be compatible with all headers. Just make sure you read the writing on each individual connector. Please check the troubleshooting info at the end of the article for important information on this configuration

Power and Ground separate, d-, d+ joined Lian-Li style

Compatibility: Compatible with all common headers. This sort of arrangement is common to almost all Lian-Li cases. Make sure that you get the wires connected to your header in the proper order. If you find that the port does not function the most common cause is accidental reverse of the d-,d+. Try switching it.

All pins joined Intel style easy connector

usbinst4
making the Connection Once you know what type of header you have, and what type of connector you have on the wiring, you need to connect the two of them. In order to do this, you must first figure out what pin goes with what part of the connector. To do this, you should first consult your motherboard manual. Below you'll find an excerpt from a fairly recent motherboard manual for the Asus A7M266 motherboard. It's typical of a motherboard manual for a board using the Intel standard USB header.

instusb5

The first thing you'll probably notice is that the wiring from your case and the names of the pins might not quite match up name wise. This is a common problem. Motherboard makers and case makers really haven't decided on what to call each pin. Here's a rough list of names.

Power may be called: P, VCC, USB Power, Power, and PUSB. On wiring it's always red. Ground may be called: G, GND, Ground, and GUSB. D- may be called: USB-, USBP-, D-, or just -. D+ may be called: USB+, USBP+, D+, or just +.

To complicate things a bit more you'll probably notice that there's a number before each one. Take a look at the picture above from the USB hookup diagram for the A7M266.

You'll see that Asus decided to number the middle pins. On the first row (starting with pin 1, and marked with a 1) you'll find that they list D- as USBP2-, and D+ as USBP2+. The number 2 tells you a few things. First off: It's the 3rd USB port on the motherboard (they started numbering at 0), second it tells you that that D- and D+ must be used for the same port. Case manufacturers are just as likely to number their ports differently.

Take a look once again at the 4-pin joined picture: usbheader

Notice that you're D-'s have either a 1 or a 2 on them. These also tell you that they are part of the same USB port. (Remember, 1 port has 4 required wires). The numbering on the connector and the numbering on the header doesn't have to match.

To connect everything grab the following connectors: a same number D pair, (D-, D+), 1 power, and one ground. If your power and ground are numbered make sure all 4 are the same number.

Tip: Most cases that use all separated pins will bundle these together for you to make it easier.

Now, take your Power, D-, D+, and Ground and line the connector up with the appropriate 4 header pins on your motherboard. The header pins will be in a row under the Intel style, and in the Gigabyte style it will either be a row of 1 pin, a gap, and then 3 pins, or 3 pins, a gap, and then 1 pin. Press the connector down over the header pin and make sure it's firmly attached. Once you have done this go back and grab another set of connector wires (Power, D-, D+, Ground), and hook up your second front USB port. If your case has more then 2 front USB ports, and your motherboard has more then one front USB headers, then repeat the above as necessary.

Example: If you were hooking up the front USB on a A7M266, on a case with the pictured 4-pin joined connector type then: VCC lines up with USB Power, USBP2- lines up with USB1-, USBP2+ lines up with USB1+, and GND lines up with GND. For port 2, VCC lines up with USB Power, USBP3- lines up with USB2-, USBP3+ lines up with USB2+, and GND lines up with GND.

May 21, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

3.5'' internal memory card reader/writer installation problem


Your reader/writer is set up for use on 2 USB ports (hence the 9 pin connector), one port for the reader and one for the externak USB port. This has nothing to do with the port version. The long and short of it is you need a card with a matching internal header. NEVER break off a pin! Some of these headers have reversed connectons so you probably broke of one of the data pins and runed that header's ability. Typically the readers like you have come with several cables, so that they can match the headers you have available. Older motherboards and add on USB cards did not use standardized header configurations aas you seem to have found out. Your best bet at this point is contact the manufacturer of the reader and find out what brand of add on USB cards they recommend and go with that. AND AGAIN NEVER REMOVE ANY PINS FROM A HEADER !!!

Feb 11, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

How to install a sd card reader on a Dell Dimension 8200 PC Desktop? no 4 pin usb on motherboard?


I managed to install a card reader on my Dell Dimension 8200.

The main problem is that the Dell motherboard does not have the correct USB pin. This is a 9-pin MoBo USB header.

The quick answer is I installed a USB card with an internal port.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Unbranded-USB-2-0-PCI-Card/dp/B00066LPA2/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1264968643&sr=1-6

Secondly I reverse mounted a powered 4-port USB hub in the spare 3.5" bay.

http://www.cablecity.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=1149&ref=6


Third, I purchased 2 USB 5 pin male to usb leads...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/v2-0-Male-Motherboard-Header-Connector/dp/B000QC7NKM/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_t

You cannot buy a USB card with 2 internals and do away with the 4 port powered USB hub because the card reader does need to be connected to a powered USB port.

for more info see this...

http://www.mods-n-clocks.co.uk/?p=181

Jan 23, 2010 | Dell Dimension 8200 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Emachine t1840 wiring diagram power switch wire to mother board ?


Because there are so many different case and motherboard combinations sometimes it can be difficult following the instructions for connecting the front panel, USB header and audio header.

Below is a few generic guide that should stop some of the confusion with the labels on the wires.

frontpanelsetup.jpg

usbheadersetup.jpg

Front Panel Audio
audiosetup.jpg

***Please note this is a generic wiring guide and we can not guarantee it will work with every motherboard. Please check your motherboard manual first. Wiring the headers wrong can cause damage to the motherboard and case, this damage is not covered by the warranty***

another handy USB wiring guide can be found here http://www.directron.com/installusb.html

this maybe easier to follow

FRONT PANEL AUDIO

2________10
__

1________9

Pin Wire
1) Mic In
2) GND (ground) or if 2xGND available, it’s the GND for the headphones, NOT the Mic
3) Mic BIAS
4) n/c
5) Speaker Right Out
6) Speaker Right Return
7) n/c
8) no pin (n/c)
9) Speaker Left Out
10) Speaker Left Return

n/c = not connected



USB (F_USB1 and also F_USB2)

2________10

 x
1________9

Top row of pins
2 = USB port 2 : VCC/Power/+5V
4 = USB port 2 : Data -/D-
6 = USB port 2 : Data +/D+
8 = USB port 2 : Ground/GND
10 = USB port 2 : pin present, but not connected to anything.

Bottom row of pins
1 = USB port 1 : VCC/Power/+5V
3 = USB port 1 : Data -/D-
5 = USB port 1 : Data +/D+
7 = USB port 1 : Ground/GND
9 = USB port 1 : no pin present

Front Panel Connector (FP1)

1 2
x 




9 10

1 = no pin present
3 & 5 = Power Switch
7 & 9 = Power LED (light)

2 = pin present, but not connected to anything.
4 & 6 = Reset Switch
8 = 10 = Hard Drive LED (light)

Jul 30, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

How to replace ethernet port in gateway gt5404


If your motherboard's ethernet (RJ-45) port is the only problem, you have two options. For a workaround, use a spare PCI or PCI-Express slot and add a network card. Assuming their is nothing wrong further down the line than the port itself, that should get you back on the web / home network.

If however, you do not have a (spare) slot to add a network card, the only alternative is repair. Most manufacturers are good about helping customers with repairs, though of course, at a cost. Even worse with RMAs is the shipping cost, which is often completely billed to you, both ways. For this reason, motherboards are usually cheaper to replace than repair.

Desoldering the RJ-45/USB module from your motherboard may seem like a simple task, but the average joe with a soldering kit simply doesn't have the ability to do this sort of repair without further causing further damage to the board. Leave the repairs to the professionals. If you are trained to do this sort of work, you shouldn't need any advice about how its done.

Sep 17, 2008 | PC Desktops

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