Question about Coronado P.S.T. CaK Telescope

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I have a Coronado PST and can't seem to see anything through it??? I can get the sunlight in the finder window, but don't have any glimpse of an image in the lens. It is almost if there is something blocking the lens. Please help

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HI lyuen: its possible the finder scope/window is not aligned properly , or these type of scope need very careful focusing. otherwise it will be difficult to see the sun.
hope this helps.

Posted on Jun 28, 2011

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Meade refractory telescope


  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Jan 27, 2013 | Coleman AstroWatch 625x50 Refractor...

1 Answer

I cant view anything from the finderscope in relation to the telescope


They must be lined up, and if you are using a higher power eyepiece, this must be more precise as your field of view is smaller.
There will be some type of adjustment on the finderscope, probably 3 thumbscrews around the holder tube.

Put in a low power eyepiece and point the scope at a local feature such as a streetlight or distant building. Get this centered in the eyepiece. Then adjust the finder only so the feature is centered in the finder as well.

Put in a higher power eyepiece and center the feature again in the telescope EP, and readjust the finder centering by itself, if needed.

Then choose a bright star and by moving the scope mount, place this in the center of the finder. Check if the star is properly centered in the EP as well and if not, move the scope mount until it is. Then finally adjust the finder centering by itself.

Feb 07, 2012 | Celestron Telescopes

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Cant see anything through the view finder


1. During the day, use the 17mm eyepiece on a object outside (telephone pole, water tower, etc) then align the finder to what you see in the scope.
2. Put in the 7.5mm eyepiece and fine align the red dot finder.
3. At night, point the finder at the moon (less than half moon or the image is too bright without a moon filter) Use the 17mm eyepiece.
4. Once you see the moon, switch to the 7.5mm lens and enjoy.
5. Download Stellarium or any free astronomy software and see what is in your sky tonight. Your scope should be able to see Jupiter and its moons easily.(Saturn, Mars and Venus when the time is right) Open clusters like Pleiades will be nice is this fast scope.
5. If stars are not sharp, you may need to collimate the scope. Look online for general instructions.

Nov 14, 2011 | Telescopes

1 Answer

I have a new solarmax II 60 with the rich field tuning. The lever will not stay in one place especially when the scope is at an angle. Also I cant see that its doing anything to the image. When I first...


This is a VERY high dollar telescope. Something is broken with the "tuning" lever. Return it for repair. Do not take it apart.

Contact Meade:
http://www.meade.com/support/index.html

Jun 25, 2011 | Coronado SolarMax 60 Telescope

1 Answer

Just bought a Bushnell telescope 78-4501 - set it up as per the instructions. I can see objects light etc... through the object finder or view finder but I see nothing through the telescope not even...


This is not a real telescope, it is a toy. You will be lucky to see anything with the 20mm lens only. the rest are junk. The telescope needs to be collimated (see your manual) and the finder aligned with the telescope. Align the finder with the scope during the day, although this model was known for poor mounting on the finderscope and will become un-aligned easily.

Oct 17, 2010 | Bushnell Telescopes

1 Answer

I assembled it without a manual because i cant find one, and i cant seem to work it everything looks good but with the lense i cant quite seem to work it, ...


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Go outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object using the eyepiece mentioned above.

Line up the small finder scope with the main tube-- point the scope at the top of a distant telephone pole or church steeple.

Without moving the scope, line up the cross-hairs in the finder scope with the same object. Once this is lined up you can use the small finder scope to locate objects in the sky.

Read my TIPS on my profile page.

Jul 14, 2010 | Citiwell International Orbitor 5500...

1 Answer

Can not seem to focus when we look through the lens we just see the bk=lack sky we cannot seem to see anything


try this:
see the mini scope on top of the telescope?--that's called the finder scope--
you look through that to see what the telescope is aimed at, just like what a sniper does before he pulls the trigger.

put in the lowest power eyepiece you have in the telescope, the one with a high number on it.

it's a good idea to align the 'finder' with the telescope during the day time--it's much easier.

if your telescope and finder scope aren't aligned properly, aiming your telescope at any target will be off and you'll just get frustrated.
to do this, look through your finder scope and pick a far away target, put in the lowest power eyepiece you have, that's the one with a high number--
high number = low power = a nice big view in the telescope.
low number on eyepiece = high magnification, like a zoom lens.

always use the lowest eyepiece first, then work your way to higher magnification, if you want to get a closer look at your target.

use lowest power eyepiece in telescope--> look through finder scope -->focus the image--> switch to higher power of eyepiece for a closer look at your target.

practice this during the day until you're comfortable, then try it at night.
try the moon, it's a nice big target

you can also use binoculars to check out the night sky.
you can try using 7x35 or 7x50 binoculars.
you see a lot more stars and it gives nice big views of the stars and constellations...and the moon...

hope this helps :D


Jul 30, 2009 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

PST CaK, can't see any light coming through.


I don't know quite what you mean by the "finder" as it doesn't come with a finder scope but it sounds as if it wasn't pointed directly at the sun.

Dec 02, 2008 | Coronado P.S.T. CaK Telescope

1 Answer

40mm Solarmax Filter


Howdy,

Measure the aperture of the output (eyepiece end) of the blocking filter. That diameter in mm determines the BF size.

That is not the only difference among all the bloacking filters but is the way to determine which one you have.

Regards, Marc

Jun 27, 2008 | Coronado SolarMax 40 Telescope

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