Question about Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

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My negatives are turning out clear.

I am a student and I first developed my own negatives, and they were completely clear, so I figured that I devolped them wrong, but then my professor said that I did develop them correctly, and that it must be my camera. I decided to shoot a roll of color and take it up to a one hour and see if they would come out, and they didn't. So I am wondering if it has to do with certain settings, or if my camera will just not work.

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Re: My negatives are turning out clear.

"Clear" = no exposure, right? Two possibilities: light not getting in; or film not advancing. To check the former, take a "picture" with the camera open at the back. See the light through the lens? Yes = OK, No = there is a problem with the shutter. Most likely the film is not advancing. Here's a test. Load the camera with a roll of film and take one picture. Open the camera and see if film moved. If not, go read the manual to make sure you are loading it properly.

Posted on Feb 10, 2007

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Why is film clear after developing? Using bulk load Tmaxx 400

Sounds like the camera isn't working. It would appear the shutter doesn't function because you have no images at all. I would open up the camera and check this. (Empty of film of course).

Feb 25, 2015 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

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I took 4 rolls of film in for development but when I got them back all of them were either very under or overexposed despite taking all the pictures according to the light meter in the viewfinder of my...

Are you looking at the picture as in a print OR are you holding the negative up to the light and looking at it that way. Don't touch the negatives, they should be in a protective sleeve but you can see through it. You should be able to see if the spacing between the frames is messed up and if you have lighter and darker negatives. Looking at a print from an automated one hour service isn't worth the time of day to determine a problem. The Pentax K1000 is the work horse of the century for students learning photography and a lot of them have seen extensive use, also the camera is quite old. What I expect is if the negatives are showing overlapping frames AND the exposure is off sometimes over and other times underexposed then the camera needs service lubrication and adjustment. It's great that the light meter is working but the shutter speed could be off and the advance is skipping giving the overlap. I don't know where you are in this world but in Canada that's a $80.00 to $120.00 fix and have the repair person change the light seals while he/she has it apart.
The Pentax K1000 is still a great camera it's up to you whether or not to spend the money. I can't tell you what to do but I can suggest that if you are going to shoot film you find some place that does it with a little more human touch. Hope this was a help

Jan 24, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

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My equipment: N75, 28-80, 70-210, 50fixed. I generally use Ilford 100 or 400 b & w films. I seem to have a - recurring - problem with the end result. The pictures are severally grainy, irregular...

The grainy nature of the picture is nothing to do with the camera. Do you develop your own film? If you don't and you are paying for processing, find a new processing house! If you are; the problem is reticulation. In any case the 400 ASA negative film will be more grainy that the 100 ASA. Both will benefit from some thoughtful processing. Key points that will help are: Do not over-develop or "push" the film. Pushing is leaving the film in the developer for longer than the recommended time (on the instructions in with the developer chemica)l. Pushing will increase the effective film speed by a controlled amount, but will always increase grain size, some times worth the price. BUT... the most common reason for graininess when not "pushing" film is reticulation. This is caused by the simple mistake of washing the film after developing and fixing (hopefully at 20 degrees C), in cold tap water. The sudden temperature change causes the grains to join up (Reticulate, just like a giraffe!) into bigger grains. Not reversible. Just do the wash stage in water that is the same temperature as the developer and the fixer. Of course the wash or stopper between dev and fix can cause the same problem... same answer, have everything at 20 degC. The irregular patches (dark on the negative) will be caused by insufficient agitation during development. The tank should be inverted every few seconds, or if in a commercial dev line, it should have nitrogen gas agitation every few seconds. Usually what happens is the dev house runs out of nitrogen but doesn't realise it has. If you can post a sample of your pictures I can be more accurate with a diagnosis, or email some to me at

Dec 22, 2010 | Nikon F75 35mm SLR Camera

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Canon Rebel 35mm - Line down centre

This looks as if the negative has been scratched by the minilab processor. It could be scratched in tha camera but with this camera there are only two places this could happen resulting in this kind of scratch.

One is the film cassette itself, the other is the take-up spool, where the film is wound onto itself. However this would not be likley to create a scratch affecting more than one or two negs.

Colour film has a built in orange filter which compensates for the excess sensitivity of colour papers to blue. If this is scratched away, then more blue get's through which prints yellow.

The processing machine uses sqeegee's to prevent carry-over of chenicals form one bath to another, and damage or contaminaton of any one of these can scratch the negative. This is much more likely during processing, as the emulsion is softer when wet.

Films usually have a protective anti-scratch layer, but the protection is not 100%. Also develelped emulsion is generally harder than undeveloped as the last development stage often contains chemical hardeners designed to give extra protection to the negative.

The reason it may not show on all the prints is simply that these days many colour film is printed by digital scanning. Many scanners can detect scratches by viewing the negative in infrared light. Photographic dyes are transparent to infrared in order to reduce heat absorption from enlarger lamps, so there should be no image visible in infrared, anything that is must be dust or a scratch. The image can them be processed to compensate for the scrathes making them virtually undetectable.

A thin scratch may be filled in by using pixesl just either side of the scratch to fill the scratch in. With a wider scratch, if there is some residual image then the software can use that and nearby unscratched areas as a guide to make an acceptable guess as to what was supposed to be there. If the scratch is too wide and too deep it will just give up. A bodged attempt may end-up worse than the scratch. (Often a skilled touch up artist can make it dissapear, but machines on their own are not that smart yet.)

So the good news is that your camera is unlikely to be at fault.

If this shows on one film or a batch of films processed at the same time, take them back to the processor. (I have done this before and been paid a fair amount of compensation. If they printed them at the same time it should be obvious that the negs were scratched before you took them home.)

On the other hand if this is showing on films processed at the same place over a period of time then don't use them again.

If this is happening no matter where you get the film developed, then you might need to check you camera!

Jan 19, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Pictures did not take-negatives were clear

It seems like a fault with the shuttter.  You will need to get it repaired.

Dec 12, 2008 | Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

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Hello, I just recently put eight rolls of film at Wal-mart to be developed. All of the pictures did not take. All the negatives were clear. What could have caused this to happen. I did not know that there...


the battery you mention is used for memory back up. when you change the main batteries this battery keeps the memory from needing reset. if the film is completely clear the film was not exposed to light. now if the film was transported and the meter and LED was working then the shutter was not opening, an easy check----- just take the lens off and fire the shutter a few times. the shutter may not fire if the film door is opened.
if the shutter is not opening it must be replaced, if you can find a camera repair shop that fixes vintage camera's any parts replaced will be good used.

Dec 12, 2008 | Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

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2 rolls out of a 3-pack ruined.

I would suggest you buy an off-brand roll of 12 or 24 exposures. Run it through the camera taking snaps of anything -- but make sure you vary the lighting, ISO, shutter speed, aperture, etc. as you snap the pics. Don't worry too much about composition. This roll is a quick test, NOT for photos to keep.

Have the film developed and then follow-up with comments on the results. I'll gladly assist you further at that time.

Nov 11, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Film developing clear


This problem could have a number of causes,

To check to see if it is a camera fault of developing fault you could try using a cheap colour film in the camera and getting it developed at a normal photo processor.
This will determine in which half of the process the fault lies.
If the pictures from the colour film are the same then it must be a camera usage problem or fault.
If the pictures are ok from the colour film then it will be a problem in either the film being used, developing problem (poor mix of chemicals etc).

This will just speed up the diagnosis a bit.

Oct 02, 2008 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Canon A1, last 3 rolls came back from the lab, no photos, clear negatives?

Send it to me with lens and I will e-mail you regarding cost and time best guess right now? 75.00 includes cleaning plus 5.00 to ship back to you, Art

Mar 16, 2008 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Problem with print

It sounds like your shutter may be failing.

The N80 has a vertical travel focal plane shutter. This is essentially two curtains that travel across the film plane. At lower shutter speeds, one curtain opens up the shurter, you wait, then the next one travels across, stopping the exposure. At faster speeds, though, they both move together, leaving a small gap between them to let light through.

If the first shutter curtain isn't always making it all the way to the top, this could give you just what you're seeing -- a black band across the top of the photo. One blank negative may well indicate that your shutter failed completely on that shot.

This is something best handled by a camera repair shop. It could possibly just be some dirt in the shutter mechanism, which would be fixed by a good CLA (clean, lube, adjust) ... that's no a bad idea if it's an older camera anyway. However, it could be more than that. It won't be clear which without getting down into the camera itself.

Nov 30, 2007 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

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