Question about Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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Why do scuba diving pressure gauges reach 5000 psi if a tank may only be filled to a max of around 3200?

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Scuba tanks can be filled well past 3200psi. When they do a hydrostatic test it is well beyond any pressure that any dive shop will fill a tank to. The highest I've seen the pressure get in my tank is 4000 and that is when the filler at the dive shop forgot about it.

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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All pressure gages are least accurate at either end of their displaied scale and most accurate in their mid (1/3) scale range.
Thus for 3000psi ish air fill , a 5000psi gage would be normally be used. This does not mean you will have bad readings at lower scale readings, just that the mid range gives best readings. This holds true for most gages and tools.

Posted on May 30, 2011

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Different tanks with different conections (for profesional diving) use higher presure

Posted on Jul 23, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Why do they put the scuba tank in water while refilling it??


A scuba tank is design to hold a certain volume of air, at a particular at a particular temperature. In the US, the standard tank is an aluminum 80 CF tank. At room temperature and 3,000 psi, the tank holds 72 CF of air (yeah, I know they round up calling it 80 CF tank). When you are filling the tank, the air and tank will become warm/hot. If you check the pressure guage while the tank is warm, it will give you a reading of X. Once the tank cools, it will give you a reading that is less than X. They put the tanks in the water in the hopes of keeping the temperature do, and filling the tanks closer to the design pressure and temperature. Some examples that you can see... In Mexico, many of the tanks will be sitting in the sun while on the boat. The tank may have a reading of 3,200 psi. Once you jump in the water, and the tank cools down, the new reading may be 2,800 psi without ever breathing any of the air. I have been ice diving, the tank was acutally colder than the water. Since the water temperature was warmer than the tank, me pressure reading was slightly higher.

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Scuba HP pressure gauge has air bubble inside. Can I fill with kerosine?


Pressure gauges are sealed and should not ever get bubbles in them. If there's air in the gauge, there's some possibility the Bourdon tube has a crack in it. You will spend more time dinking around with getting a bubble out and resealing the gauge than the instrument is worth. The pressure gauges on a fill station are industry standard parts and you can buy replacements off the shelf. They're not terribly expensive. Replace it.

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Scuba tank maintenance


"The scuba tank is one of the most important pieces of dive equipment. It must be looked after. A well-maintained tank could give 20 or 30 years service. A neglected tank can fail with the force of a hand grenade. It pays to care for a scuba tank, not only for economy, but also for safety and diving enjoyment. The following ten tips can help ensure a scuba diving tank will provide many years of faithful diving service. 1) Never completely empty a scuba tank. Always leave at least 1000 kPa to ensure moisture doesn’t enter. 2) Always rinse the scuba tank and valve in fresh water after use. 3) If the scuba tank is to be stored for a few months, drain the air down to around 1000 kPa. This is to decrease the amount of oxygen that can cause corrosion. 4) A scuba tank should be stored standing up out of direct sunlight. 5) A scuba tank should be carried with care and attention. They shouldn’t be carried on the shoulder as a fall can lead to the valve getting smashed off and the tank taking off like a rocket. 6) A scuba tank should be regularly tested in accordance with statutory regulations. 7) A scuba tank should not be left in a closed car in the heat of the day. It can heat up and explode or the burst disk can rupture; both scenarios leading to damage to the car. When in the car the tank should be carried with the valve towards the back. If the car brakes suddenly the tank valve won’t be damaged as the tank moves forward with its momentum. 8) The scuba tank valve should not be turned off too tightly. It only has to be just nipped closed enough to stop the air flow. 9) A scuba tank should be filled with clean, dry air. Any discolouration around the air outlet or bad odour should be treated with suspicion. If there are any doubts that a tank has been filled with bad air, it should not be used for scuba diving and should be checked immediately. A bad fill can lead to damage to the tank, as well as pose a threat to a diver. 10) If painting a tank, ensure no heat curing paints or strippers are used as these could affect the strength of the tank."

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Atmos Lx BC

1 Answer

Scuba Gauges what do I need them for?


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity and length of decompression stops and to calculate residual nitrogen for repetitive dives. The time of a dive is easily tracked using a scuba diving watch and the depth is tracked using a depth gauge. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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