Question about Ogio Agent Snowboard Bag

1 Answer

What should I consider before buying a Snowboard Bag?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 2,336 Answers

For anyone new to winter sports and snowboarding in particular it can get quite expensive getting all the equipment and gear needed to indulge your winter pastime. There is the gear that you wear and the snowboard and related equipment. As the cost of buying this stuff can mount up it is natural to want to buy only the gear that is necessary. The snowboard bag might fit into this category as it does not seem o be an essential piece of equipment. This article will examine if you need a snowboard bag and what to look for if you plan to buy one. First up, if you are buying a new snowboard there is a chance that you can get a deal on a free bag. This might be more appropriate at the end of the snowboard season or even the beginning. Most retailers, both off and online, offer some kind of bonus so don't be shy to negotiate, as you are spending a lot of money on the board. If you live close to the ski resort that you plan to visit over the winter then a snowboard bag is not essential. The chances are that you will be driving to the resort so you can stow your snowboard in the car. Obviously a bag protects it more and you can tie the bag down easier than a board, but it isn't a priority to have a bag. If you think that you will be visiting different resorts or flying to the resort then a bag is essential. Most airlines won't let skis or snowboards onto the flight if they are not adequately packed. A snowboard bag will also protect the board from rough handling and potential scratching or denting of the leading edges. If you decide that you want a bag then you will be struck be the wide variety of choices available. There are bags and covers. Snowboard covers are lightweight and aimed at protecting the board from surface scratches. They are cheaper than bags and ideal for storing a snowboard or when you don't have to transport the board far. Snowboard bags come in all shapes and styles. Many bags are designed to carry more than one snowboard. They also have space for other gear to be stored in the bag. For people that do a lot of flying to resorts some snowboard bags come with wheels so that it is easy to handle in airports. You can choose the snowboard bag which can be worn like a backpack, or you can choose one that has straps with which to carry it about. In any case, you need to ensure that whatever other features your snowboard bag has, it must be water resistant and it should prevent the snowboard from becoming wet. Another important feature to look for in your snowboard bag is that it is durable and built to last and can withstand the elements as well as rough handling, and that straps can easily bear the weight of the snowboard.

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a hole in my snowboard bag. i've put duck tape over it and it came off. any other suggestions?


You can buy small nylon patch kits from most camping stores that come with glue and a selection of patches which can be glued to the inside of your bag to repair the hole. These patches are made for camping gear and waterproof clothing so are perfect for the job

Mar 02, 2010 | Burton Board Chamber Snowboard Travel Bag...

1 Answer

Need a new zipper on my DaKine snowboard bag...any idea how much?


Go to a good camping store and ask them who does the repair on their gear. Once you have a contact you can find out what cost the zip will be. If the zip is not damaged but just derailed they may be able to fix it without replacing the zip

Jan 17, 2010 | Da Kine Dakine Tour Snowboard Bag

1 Answer

Snowbard rack safety


not specific for snowboard buy general rack use : 1. The Lighter the Better Most minivan roof racks are designed for carrying lightweight objects -- like skis, small ladders, well-secured aerodynamic cargo containers (like those offered by Thule) and other light loads. 2. Mind the Center of Gravity Putting heavy boxes, bulky luggage and other weighty objects on your roof will raise the center of gravity of your vehicle, which could increase the chances of a rollover during emergency maneuvering or in the event of an accident. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHSTA) also encourages drivers to follow auto manufacturer guidelines for roof rack usage. * Rollover Risk: Load Vehicles Properly [NHTSA] 3. Strap and Secure Improperly secured roof cargo can also fly off and strike vehicles travelling behind you, sometimes with tragic results. Remember: Only put lightweight objects on your roof rack, secure cargo properly with tie-downs and strong cord, and consider purchasing an aerodynamic cargo container if you plan on using your roof rack to frequently carry light loads. More Minivans Quick Tips Sponsored Links

Dec 01, 2008 | Academy Snowboard United States Naval...

4 Answers

Snowboard length fit


"Length is one of the most important characteristics of a Snowboard. The length of a Snowboard is measured from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail. The length is usually measured in centimeters and often abbreviated to just the last two digits. Board length varies from 100cm to 180cm. To find the appropriate length for you, start by comparing the board length to your height. Although there are no dead set Rules in Selecting Board Length, the following are several guidelines to get you started. When holding the board on its end: * Short board should reach somewhere between your collar bones and chin. Shorter boards are easier to maneuver, great to be trained on, and often preferred by riders who do a lot of Snowboarding Tricks, park and Pipe Riding. * Medium length should come up between your chin and eyebrows. This length is preferred by all around intermediate to advanced riders who ride a variety of terrain, including parks and steeps. * Long boards should go from your forehead to several inches over the top of your head. Long boards are used for high-speed carving, deep powder snow surface, and big mountain terrain. Choosing the suitable board length is not only influenced by your height but also by your weight. Keep in mind that a Snowboard acts like a leaf spring - it has no clue how tall the person standing on it is. However, it does know your weight. Based on your weight or body structure, the following will help you choose the Right Length of Snowboard: * Lighter people should have shorter, more flexible boards. This is because a lighter person on a longer board commonly has a hard time controlling the board and initiating turns. * For an averagely built person, the board length should reach somewhere between the chin and your nose. * Heavier people should have longer, less flexible boards. A short board isn't advisable for heavy riders because the board often have a tendency to ""wash out"" or perform poorly, especially at higher speeds. * Freestyle riding is often done with a shorter board to allow better maneuverability. * Freeriding, deep snow, and racing boards will be longer in size. * For riders who are into Backcountry Snowboarding, go longer for stability. You may also consider your aggressive or timid style. If you're the type of boarder who really attacks the hill, you'll want to increase the length of your Snowboard up to five centimeters from the average size. Then again, if your riding style is naturally slower in character, go down five centimeters. Still, keep in mind that one Snowboard doesn't do it all."

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

1 Answer

Snowboard type or styles


"There are Three Different Types of Snowboards available on the market today: Freestyle, Freeride (All Mountain), and Alpine (Carving) Boards. Each board has a unique construction technique and materials, shape, flex pattern, and size. The type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to your particular style of riding. Freeride or All Mountain Board Freeride or All Mountain Snowboard Of the three Snowboard types, the Freeride Snowboard is the most popular. Accounting for half of all Snowboard sales, this type of board is a good all-mountain, park and Halfpipe Snowboard that is designed to float well in Powder Surface. You can enjoy carving, catching air, and basically all riding aspects with this type of Snowboard. Freeride boards have a directional shape and are meant to be ridden primarily in one direction. Having a directional shape means that the Snowboard's tip is different from its tail. In freeride, the tail is generally more narrow, shorter, and flatter than the tip of the board. With this, the stance on freeride boards is usually offset toward the tail of the board. Still, freeride boards can be ridden Fakie, despite their directional shape. Freeride Snowboards are usually fairly soft and maneuverable enough for beginners, but stiff enough to hold a fast turn in hard snow. This type of Snowboard bridges the gap between Freestyle and Alpine carving. However, it isn't as stable as a carving board and it isn't as agile as a freestyle board. Freestyle Snowboard Freestyle Snowboard A Freestyle Snowboard is wider, more stable, and more forgiving to ride. Also, it is shorter, lighter and (compared with a freeride board) softer in flex, which makes it easier to turn. These characteristics make a freestyle board very responsive to the rider. Consequently, it is the best choice for the beginner. These boards are built mainly for performing tricks in terrain parks and halfpipes (e.g. spins, air, grabs and riding fakie). Still, Freestyle Snowboards have limited edge grip and stability, and are not good for carving turns or cruising fast. Most Freestyle Snowboards are either twin tip boards or directional-twin. Twin tip boards have a centered stance with a tip and tail that are exact copies of each other, making them symmetrical in shape. Both ends of a freestyle Snowboard have a shovel, and freestyle boards with twin tip design makes it easy for beginners to ride both forward and backward (fakie). Directional-twin Snowboards are similar to the regular twin tip Snowboard; only, its tail is stiffer than the nose. Carving, Alpine, or Race Board Carving or Alpine Snowboard Carving Snowboards are narrower than freestyle and freeride boards. Their long, narrow, stiff constructions are configured for higher speeds and cleaner carved turns. With this, carving boards allow quick edge turns, swift, superior edge-holding power on hard snow, and good stability for speed. Also known as alpine boards, these snowboards almost look like an enlarged Ski. They are made in both symmetrical and asymmetrical styles and tend to only have a shovel on the nose. Similar with freeride boards, carving boards are made to ride only in one direction. While carving boards offer a higher level of performance, they are more difficult for the beginning rider to use and are generally reserved for more advanced riders. Alpine Snowboards are mainly preferred by Snowboard racers for a great day of fresh unridden powder. Keep in mind that alpine Snowboards are configured for riding and carving downhill, not for doing tricks. To summarize, freestyle, freeride, and alpine or carving Snowboards are the three basic types of Snowboards. It is easier to maneuver a soft-flexing, twin-tip, gradual side cut Freestyle Snowboard. On the other hand, it is harder to maneuver a stiffer-flex, directional, aggressive sidecut All-Mountain Snowboard with scores of combinations in between. Always remember that the type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to the type of riding that you like to do, and that both Freestyle and Freeride boards are good Snowboard types for beginning snowboarders."

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

1 Answer

How to fit a snowboard helmet?


"Getting the right fit is the most important factor to consider when buying a Snowboarding Helmet: 1. Measuring Tape. Your helmet size is determined by the circumference of your head. Wrap a measuring tape around your head to get your helmet size. 2. Align the front of the helmet above your eyebrows and hold both straps until the helmet fits well. 3. Make sure there are no unwanted gaps between the helmet lining and your head. The back of the helmet should not touch the back of your neck. 4. The helmet should fit snug and nicely. 5. Try one of your favorite pairs of Snowboard Goggles and make sure they fit properly on your helmet. Please note that the producers of helmets all have different ideas on the shape of a human head. Although the size might be right, the shape of the helmet might be different from the shape of your head."

Dec 01, 2008 | Dual Electronics Lightweight Polyurethane...

1 Answer

How to fit a snowboard boot?


" * Put on Snowboarding Socks or at least the thick socks that you would wear when you'll go Snowboarding. Do not try your Boots with regular socks. You might think it's irrelevant, but the added thickness of the socks matter a lot when it comes to the size and fit of your Snowboard Boots. Still, some people have strange misconceptions about socks. One of which is that you have to wear more than one pair of socks. This is certainly wrong since Snowboard Boots should fit snugly. It is all right if toes are grazing the ends of your boots, but make sure they aren't jammed. After all, when the boots break in a little they will feel more comfortable. * Loosen the outer (and inner if available) laces of the Snowboard Boot and insert your foot. Make sure the heel of your foot is locked in the heel of the boot. * Tighten the inner lacing first (again if available). Make it pretty tight but make sure your feet can still breathe and you don't cut off circulation. Next, tighten the outer lacing, again pretty tight, without killing your feet. * Walk around a bit and get a feeling for how well the Snowboard Boots are strapped around your feet. Make sure you don't feel any isolated, painful or stressful areas. * Now the most important test: strap into (or step into) a binding attached to a snowboard. Take on a riding position and move your weight to the front and the back of the board. Be sure the boots are securely keeping your feet on their place. Also, make certain that they are not slipping to the back or front, and that you are not experiencing painful or stressful areas on your feet. The Snowboarding Boots should make you feel both comfortable and securely strapped-in at the same time. * Lean forward. When you do this, make sure that your heel is not lifted, but that the entire boot, binding and board are making the forward move without your heel slipping out of the heel of the Snowboard Boot. If you do experience heel lift, your boot tech can add some fit aids like an Eliminator Tongue to reduce volume and increase responsiveness. This will also ensure that your heel is not slipping out of the boot. * When you try on Snowboarding Boots, take into account that as you use the boots more often, the inner bladder will get less compact because of the pressure that the bladder will be exposed to. Consequently, the Snowboard boots will become less tight as you use it more. Try to anticipate this trend by buying boots that are slightly tight. After the boots break in a little they will feel a lot better. Snowboard Boots come in all regular shoe sizes. Still, keep track of how different boots of similar sizes can vary in the way they hold your feet and ankles. Don't Buy Snowboard Boots because the internet or your friend says its cool, or your favorite rider has his/her name on it. What may feel good to one person may be excruciatingly painful to someone else. Make sure to try on many boots and only buy one that you are 100% sure of. Quality Snowboard Boots can last long, so you will want to put in more time and spend some money on this. Regardless of the Type of Snowboard Boots you intend to wear, choose the pair that fit your feet best. After all, you wouldn't want to be out of control and in pain when you ride down the slopes."

Dec 01, 2008 | Kicker Forum SLR Snowboard Boots

3 Answers

Snowboard boot type


"Snowboard Boots - Function and Types of Snowboarding Boots Good Snowboard Boots should give you maximum control over your Snowboard, protect your feet and ankles from the pressures of high speed turns, and keep your feet warm and breathing in all weather conditions at the same time. Boots come in many variations and Styles. There are Different Types of Snowboard Boots appropriate for the Three Riding Styles in Snowboarding. Currently, a lot of boarders prefer soft boots with Strap Snowboard Bindings, but step-ins are a convenient alternative. What follows are descriptions of the most common types of Snowboard Boots: Soft Boots Softboot Soft Boots are most comfortable and can be used with highback bindings and flow-in bindings. This type of Snowboard Boots allows for a large amount of movement in just about any direction. Consequently, soft boots are a must for pulling tricks since they are great for doing whatever you want. Soft Boots consist of two parts: an inner bladder and an outer boot. The inner bladder is padded to keep your feet warm, dry and protected from heavy impacts. It usually has its own lacing so you can tighten the inner bladder independently from the outer boot. The outer boot has a sturdy upper part that allows for ankle movement. The outer lacing allows you to further tighten the Boots. In contrast to Hard Boots and Ski Boots, Soft Boots are pretty comfortable for walking and even driving your car when you're not on the board. Soft Boots are currently the Most Popular Type of Snowboard Boots and are preferred by Freestylers and Freeriders. Although there is a wide range of Soft Boot Styles for both Freestyle and Freeride Snowboarding, the main difference in the different styles is in the degree of Boot Flex. Soft Boots with a stiffer upper boot and a higher cuff with a lace-up inner boot for enhanced firmness are Freeride Soft Boot Styles. Conversely, Soft Boots with loose, molded-foam inner boots for more flexibility are Freestyle Soft Boots. Hard Boots Hardboot This Type of Snowboard Boots is designed for precise control. Hard Boots support your foot, ankle, and lower leg firmly, making them best for racing and high-speed carving on hard snow. Hard Boots have a padded inner bladder similar to the ones in Soft Boots. The outer shell however is made out of hard plastic and is usually adjusted (or closed) using buckles or ratchet bails. The benefit of having hard plastic as an outer shell is that it gives riders more precision and power in edging movements. Hard Boots resemble the traditional Ski Boots. However, the Hard Boots have lateral mobility for the ankle. To provide some flexibility, hinges are often built into the ankles. The soles of Hard Boots usually have a mechanism that allows them to be connected to Plate Bindings. Hard Boots are often used with plate bindings by Alpine Racers who want their movement to be directly transferred from the Hard Boots and Snowboard Bindings onto the Snowboard. On the contrary, Hard Boots are not suitable for Freestyle Snowboarding tricks and maneuvers since they limit the amount of flexibility. This Type of Snowboard Boots is pretty specific and seriously lessens your freedom in choice. If you're planning to buy this, make sure you find an exact match between the Binding Mechanism and the Hard Boot Mechanism. Also, make sure you can flex the Hard Boot forward easily and smoothly so as to avoid mishaps during transitions. Hybrid Step-In Boots Hybrid boot These Snowboard Boots are a good choice for those who want the convenience of a strapless system. Hybrid Step-in Boots combine the flexible, soft upper part of Soft Boots and the sturdy hard soles of Hard Boots. They are used in combination with Step-in Bindings. People who are looking for a mix between the comfort and flexibility of Soft Boots and the control of Hard Boots will often opt for Hybrid Step-in Boots. As with Hard Boots, you will need to find a match between the Step-in Binding mechanism and the Boot mechanism. Before you buy Snowboard Boots, you must first decide whether you want to go with a Step-in Binding or a traditional Strap Binding. Remember, while traditional Strap Bindings will work with any non-Step-in Boots, Step-in Boots must be purchased together with their corresponding Bindings. Also, keep in mind that Hard Boot systems work best in harder snow conditions, while soft boot systems work best in softer conditions. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Kicker Forum SLR Snowboard Boots

2 Answers

How to choose the right bag for me?


first, make sure your board fits in the bag. Than, think if you need or want it to fit something else. After that. Choose the type by price and needs. Padded or not, with wheels or not etc…

Dec 01, 2008 | Ogio Agent Snowboard Bag

Not finding what you are looking for?
Ogio Agent Snowboard Bag Logo

Related Topics:

303 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Ogio Winter Sports Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4514 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

71338 Answers

Todd Arndt
Todd Arndt

Level 3 Expert

2044 Answers

Are you an Ogio Winter Sport Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...