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Scuba Tank Safety

What safety tips can you give me on scuba tanks?

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"There is only one bit of advice you need when you own your own tanks: bring them to a professional for filling and regular inspection. Tanks are required to be visually inspected once a year, which involves removing the valve and looking inside for signs of corrosion or damage. If the tank is deemed safe, an Evidence of Inspection (EOI) sticker is applied to the tank showing the date of inspection. A hydrostatic test is required every 5 years, which determines the tank's ability to contain pressurized gas. A certified hydro test facility will stamp the shoulder of the tank below the valve with the date of pass. This inspection makes it easy for you to know if your rented tank has been properly maintained and inspected. If the hydro test stamp is more than 5 years old or the EOI sticker is more than a year old, don't accept the tank. Corrosion is the major culprit in tank degradation. Scuba tanks are filled with very dry air, to prevent moisture from rusting the interior of the tank. That is why certified divers learn never to leave a tank empty. Always leave at least 100psi of pressure in the tank at the end of your dive, so no moisture can get in when valves are opened."

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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The Rapid Diver System



Lightweight Scuba System Goes From Tactical to Practical

RAPID DIVER™ is a lightweight, all-inclusive scuba system that mates a tank, regulator and buoyancy module to a uniform-fit, load-bearing harness. It was created in response to public safety and military needs for a universal fit, compact, versatile and easily deployed scuba system.

Mission requirements called for a system that is universal fit, could be stored in a small space, donned and activated quickly, and worn in situations such as helicopter and boat operations in which conventional scuba gear would prove too cumbersome and restrictive. Comfort was also of great importance, as some operations would require the user to wear the gear for extended periods of time while engaged in complex, task-loaded missions. With an overall weight of just 25 pounds, the Rapid Diver stores in a compact hand-carried pouch, and readies for use in less than a minute. It provides sufficient air duration for the average dive a 20 to 25 minutes at moderate depths. The Rapid Diver can go from duffel to dive in 15 seconds.

Though designed for professional use, many of the Rapid Diver's performance characteristics make it equally suited to a range of civilian applications. It is the preferred system for shore diving, due to its user-friendly design, universal fit capability and ease of transporting and storage. Persons who are unable to wear heavy conventional scuba gear, or who simply feel uncomfortable with the associated bulk and weight, appreciate the light overall weight and wearer comfort of Rapid Diver. In addition to a low overall weight, the Rapid Diver features a unique load-bearing harness that distributes the weight of the tank evenly over the diver's torso, making it well suited for difficult shore entries and is also beneficial for long walks to the water or water entry from ladders or small boats. Rapid Diver's small size allows it to be stowed aboard a boat, where it can be deployed for underwater boat maintenance, anchor checks, and fast response to emergencies such as a fouled prop or suspected hull damage.


Also unique to the Rapid Diver system is the ability to configure the rig for a wide variety of mission profiles. In it's simplest form, the Rapid Diver can be configured to become a PFD by removing the tank and life support system, beneficial in most boat operations (Tactical Swimmers Vest TSV). For extended dive profiles, the Rapid Diver can be configured with standard sized tanks (80 cu ft) mounted on the innovative back pad. If mission requirements call for an even longer diving profile, the Rapid Diver can be used in conjunction with surface supplied air or in a traditional side mount configuration. Other custom-configurable gas management options allow the user to configure the rig with a redundant air supply, and to use full-face scuba masks in conjunction with a gas switching block. To extend duration and stealth, a rebreather module which clips onto the existing Rapid Diver Tactical is in the works and will be made available for military applications.

Rapid Diver is a premium product and was created by dive equipment developer and long time diver, Christopher De Felice. The Rapid Diver is manufactured in the United States, constructed using materials selected for extreme durability and wear resistance.

For the latest information about the Rapid Diver system come and join us at the Official Rapid Diver Forum:
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www.RapidDiver.com

on Jul 08, 2009 | Zeagle Rapid Diver System - Buoyancy...

1 Answer

Spg rising slowly


You should open the tank valve slowly if after opening i takes more than 3 seconds to get up to pressure something is not working properly. FOR SAFETY GAUGES ARE SUPPOSE TO BE FACING AWAY FROM U WHEN PRESSURIZING. IF GAUGE IS DEFECTIVE AIR PRESSURE CAN BLOW GAUGE LENS OUT FRONT OF GAUGE.

Apr 18, 2012 | Cressi-Sub CressiSub Mini SPG SCUBA...

1 Answer

Why do they put the scuba tank in water while refilling it??


A scuba tank is design to hold a certain volume of air, at a particular at a particular temperature. In the US, the standard tank is an aluminum 80 CF tank. At room temperature and 3,000 psi, the tank holds 72 CF of air (yeah, I know they round up calling it 80 CF tank). When you are filling the tank, the air and tank will become warm/hot. If you check the pressure guage while the tank is warm, it will give you a reading of X. Once the tank cools, it will give you a reading that is less than X. They put the tanks in the water in the hopes of keeping the temperature do, and filling the tanks closer to the design pressure and temperature. Some examples that you can see... In Mexico, many of the tanks will be sitting in the sun while on the boat. The tank may have a reading of 3,200 psi. Once you jump in the water, and the tank cools down, the new reading may be 2,800 psi without ever breathing any of the air. I have been ice diving, the tank was acutally colder than the water. Since the water temperature was warmer than the tank, me pressure reading was slightly higher.

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Atmos Lx BC

3 Answers

Why do scuba diving pressure gauges reach 5000 psi if a tank may only be filled to a max of around 3200?


Scuba tanks can be filled well past 3200psi. When they do a hydrostatic test it is well beyond any pressure that any dive shop will fill a tank to. The highest I've seen the pressure get in my tank is 4000 and that is when the filler at the dive shop forgot about it.

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Scuba tank maintenance


"The scuba tank is one of the most important pieces of dive equipment. It must be looked after. A well-maintained tank could give 20 or 30 years service. A neglected tank can fail with the force of a hand grenade. It pays to care for a scuba tank, not only for economy, but also for safety and diving enjoyment. The following ten tips can help ensure a scuba diving tank will provide many years of faithful diving service. 1) Never completely empty a scuba tank. Always leave at least 1000 kPa to ensure moisture doesn’t enter. 2) Always rinse the scuba tank and valve in fresh water after use. 3) If the scuba tank is to be stored for a few months, drain the air down to around 1000 kPa. This is to decrease the amount of oxygen that can cause corrosion. 4) A scuba tank should be stored standing up out of direct sunlight. 5) A scuba tank should be carried with care and attention. They shouldn’t be carried on the shoulder as a fall can lead to the valve getting smashed off and the tank taking off like a rocket. 6) A scuba tank should be regularly tested in accordance with statutory regulations. 7) A scuba tank should not be left in a closed car in the heat of the day. It can heat up and explode or the burst disk can rupture; both scenarios leading to damage to the car. When in the car the tank should be carried with the valve towards the back. If the car brakes suddenly the tank valve won’t be damaged as the tank moves forward with its momentum. 8) The scuba tank valve should not be turned off too tightly. It only has to be just nipped closed enough to stop the air flow. 9) A scuba tank should be filled with clean, dry air. Any discolouration around the air outlet or bad odour should be treated with suspicion. If there are any doubts that a tank has been filled with bad air, it should not be used for scuba diving and should be checked immediately. A bad fill can lead to damage to the tank, as well as pose a threat to a diver. 10) If painting a tank, ensure no heat curing paints or strippers are used as these could affect the strength of the tank."

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Atmos Lx BC

1 Answer

First and second scuba regulator


The scuba regulator has two parts: a 1st stage and a second stage connected by a hose. The 1st stage connects right to the tank; the 2nd stage is the contraption behind your mouthpiece. Both have an important function in regulating air flow throughout your scuba system.

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

1 Answer

Scuba boots / booties maintenance


" 1. Rinse your booties in clean, freshwater after each dive and allow them to dry thoroughly before storing. After a div, your booties will be covered in a salty residue and/or dirt. This must be rinsed clean to prevent the neoprene from degrading. Your scuba booties must be completely dry before storing to ensure the neoprene stays clean, odor-free and free of mildew or mold. 2. Scuba bootie zippers should be lubricated occasionally to prevent degradation of the metal or plastic. 3. Always store your scuba booties out of direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will break down the neoprene after years of exposure. 4. Periodically machine or hand-wash your scuba booties. A good rinse after each dive helps to keep your booties clean, but to ensure there is no residue or grit left on your booties you must properly clean them on a regular basis. You can purchase a commercially prepared neoprene shampoo, zipper lubricant/desalter and a neoprene sealant to thoroughly clean and seal your scuba booties. A commercial shampoo and sealant are specifically manufactured to care for your neoprene and is the recommended method for proper maintenance. 5. Any holes in the neoprene on your scuba booties can be fixed using a commercial wet suit cement. "

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

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