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Scuba suit need?

Do I need a scuba suit?

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"Wet suits and dry suits are very important when it comes to scuba diving. Your normal body temperature hovers around 98.6F (37C). If you are scuba diving in water that is cooler than your body temperature your temperature will drop. In all water, even the warmest, tropical waters, you will need thermal protection, like a wet suit, dry suit or dive skin, to keep warm and to keep safe while scuba diving. The cold affects our ability to think and our physical response time slows, which can lead to an accident. Warm tropical water will begin to feel cold after prolonged scuba diving, so it is always a good idea to wear light insulation at a minimum. When choosing thermal protection, like a wet suit or dry suit, you need to consider the following factors: Water temperature Your activity level during a dive Your body size You should always wear more insulation in colder water and lighter insulation in warmer water. Your level of activity can be a good indicator of how much insulation you should wear during a scuba dive. The more active you are during a dive the more heat your body generates and the warmer you remain throughout your dive. Larger scuba divers may need less insulation than smaller scuba divers and small, muscular scuba divers may need less insulation than larger scuba divers. It is important for you to try different amounts of insulation in differing water temperatures to determine what you need. Some scuba divers need more insulation than others, regardless of activity or size. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical water wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others need a 2mm wet suit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm wet suit, while others need the protection of a dry suit. If you are scuba diving in water below 55F (12.7C), a dry suit is the warmest type of thermal insulation available. Dive skins, wet suits and dry suits also protect your skin from cuts, scrapes, abrasions and stings which can occur while you are scuba diving. A simple brush against specific forms of coral and fish can cause painful irritations and burns on bare skin, but may not be noticeable or even occur, if your skin is protected."

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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Posted on Sep 10, 2016

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What is a dry suit and how is it different to a wet suit.


A dry suit is loose fitting apart from a sealed neck, wrists and ankles to stop the water getting in. Dry suits do not provide insulation and the clothes worn under the dry suit keep the people warm they are used more for deep sea diving. Wet suits no not keep a person dry but they are insulated to keep the person warm during water sports or scuba diving.

Jan 14, 2013 | Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

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KNOWN PROBLEMS WITH FREELIFE WETSUITS


Is the wetsuit actually to small for you? Wetsuits are fairly delicate, especially the thinner ones. Having a can of neoprene cement in your kit is a smart idea. Read the instructions on the can if you want it to work well.

May 07, 2010 | Wet International Bcd Regulator Hanger Wet...

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Guidelines to Scuba Regulator Purchase


The scuba regulator is employed in an open-circuit scuba set. Said scuba equipment reduces high air pressure conveyed by the diving cylinder to the first stage and feeds breathable gas to the diver through the second stage's mouthpiece. Also called pressure regulator or demand regulator, the scuba equipment is one of the essentials to diving that determines breathing quality and inhalation effort during the dive. But given the different types of regulators and the pertinent design of its first and second stage components, how should a neophyte diver - or even a seasoned diver at that, choose a scuba regulator that incorporates user adjustment and delivers a venturi-assisted air flow in its features? Consider your diving purpose and frequency. Better yet, take note of the following criteria to guide you in your purchase: 1. The Scuba Regulator's Mouthpiece. Check the specifications if the regulator is outfitted with a patented orthodontic mouthpiece. This implies that it is ergonomically-designed to accommodate an overbite or underbite by the human mouth. An ergonomic mouthpiece helps reduce fatigue in the mouth and jaw area, particularly in the cruise of lower depths and extended dives. 2. User Adjustment Settings. There are optimally-designed scuba regulators that are outfitted with adjustment levers to therefore allow divers to finetune valve settings in order to provide the least possible inhalation effort throughout the dive. One notable scuba equipment is the Aeris AT 400 Pro Regulator that is equipped with an adjustable second stage. 3. Weight of the Scuba Regulator. Visualize yourself on a dive and using just any other type of scuba regulator. Is the regulator bulky to considerably increase drag and cause jaw fatigue or is it buoyant enough for you to carry around with your mouth? Lightweight scuba regulators use polycarbonate thermoplastics for its housing to make the scuba equipment compact, sturdy and corrosion-resistant that makes them fit for extended use. 4. Nitrox Compatibility. This entails an ocular inspection of the cylinder tank (Nitrogen and Oxygen proportions) and scuba regulator (Nitrox compatibility) specifications. As a matter of convention, most regulators are suited for nitrox mixture use out of the box; containing the standard, maximum proportion of 40% Oxygen (in terms of volume) but then again, there are gas mixes supporting leaner proportions of oxygen such as the trimix. Therefore, check if the scuba regulator supports the gas mixture configured for your diving cylinder prior to purchase. 5. No-Contaminant Feature. As much as possible, choose a diving regulator that has been manufactured using Dry Valve Technology (DVT). DVT operates through an automatic valve that prevents contamination of the first stage mechanism to thus prevent regulator flooding and the entry of moisture or dust particles. This likely improves scuba regulator performance and extends its useful life. 6. Air-Sharing Feature. This feature often associated with octopus regulators (used as a spare demand valve or alternate second stage) will prove to be most helpful during diving emergencies such as a free flow or during diver rescues. High performance octopus regulators such as the Aeris Gyro Octopus Regulator are designed lightweight and with air-sharing feature, while sporting an inline swivel for convenience mounting and flexibility

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

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How to choose a scuba mask


"The shape of the scuba mask and the silicone skirt on the mask must conform to the shape of your face to provide you with a comfortable fit. Ensuring the silicone skirt is a high-grade, flexible silicone can help to ensure the scuba mask conforms to the shape of your face and the long life of your scuba mask. Some people are allergic to different types of rubber, if you have an allergy to rubber, be sure to choose a silicone scuba mask because silicone is hypoallergenic. Always talk to your scuba diving gear retailer about the alternatives available to you. When trying on scuba masks you will notice the different shapes of the nose pockets. The nose pocket protects and cushions your nose, helps to keep your scuba mask from fogging during a dive and helps you to maintain equalization. Ensure the size and shape of your nose pocket is comfortable; not too tight and not too large. This will improve not only the comfort of your scuba mask, but your ability to purge your mask efficiently. There are increasingly different styles of scuba mask straps on the market. You may like the factory issue strap on your scuba mask or you may want to purchase a separate strap. Scuba mask straps are available in a single strap or a double strap design. The single strap should wrap around the centre of the back of your head. The benefit of the double strap is that you can position the top strap on the upper part of your head and the bottom strap on the lower part of your head to offer extra stability and comfort. Most scuba mask straps are rubber or silicone and fasten with a post-hole belt enclosure. Newer scuba masks offer a slide-lock type enclosure, which allows you to adjust the scuba mask quickly and easily when wearing the mask. Scuba masks are constantly improving. If you wear prescription glasses or contact lenses on a daily basis you can purchase a scuba mask without having to wear your glasses or contact lenses under your mask. Many manufacturers will create custom scuba masks which include your prescription in the front lens. A good sign you have chosen the right scuba mask for your face is when the mask stays on your face comfortably without using the straps to hold it in place. You should try this simple test with each scuba mask you try on for the first time: See our choices for scuba masks 1. Place the scuba mask over your eyes and mouth ensuring the mask is in the correct position. 2. Take a quick, light breath in through your nose and immediately start to breathe through your mouth as if you are scuba diving. This will create a slight suction between the scuba mask and your face. The scuba mask should stay on your face. If you must push the scuba mask against your face, or inhale repeatedly to help the mask stay on your face, the mask is not a good fit. 3. Keep the scuba mask on your face for approximately one minute. This will help you to determine how tight the seal is and how comfortable the mask is on your face. 4. Exhale gently through your nose to release the seal on your scuba mask and remove the mask from your face. There should be no mark on your face from the scuba mask. If there is a red line around your face from the seal of the mask, the seal was too tight or the mask is not the proper size for your face. Try the test a second time. If you still have a red mark on your face after you remove the mask, you need to continue your search for a scuba mask. Remember, a good scuba mask is one that's comfortable, doesn't leak and is easy to use."

Dec 01, 2008 | Vision Mares Pure Mask

1 Answer

Do I need a scuba regulator and if so, how do I know which one to buy?


"Because the scuba regulator is such a vital piece of gear many scuba divers choose to buy their own scuba regulator instead of renting one from the dive shop. When a scuba diver has used a few different scuba regulators, on numerous dives, he will notice that they all have slightly different ""action"" - some feel looser or tighter, some will deliver air more forcefully, others will have a slight ""suck"" to them. The goal of all regulators is the same: to deliver air on demand at ambient pressure. Comfort with a scuba regulator depends on how the diver breathes; which is different for everyone. Though a helpful clerk at the dive gear shop can recommend ""the best"" regulators, from the most respected manufacturers, in truth no one can tell you which regulator ""feels right"", except you. Sponsor Links [what's this?] As a novice scuba diver renting or borrowing equipment from a dive shop always take note of what scuba regulator you are using and whether you like how it feels. When you find the one which makes your breathing feel effortless remember its make and model. When you decide to buy your own scuba regulator you will know which one to get. When shopping for a scuba regulator here are some things to consider: See our choices for scuba regulators * Ergonomic design and easy to hold * A purge button which is easily pressed even when wearing 6mm neoprene gloves * External controls which let you make fine adjustments to air flow * Non-corroding metals like titanium or chromed brass * Diaphragm vs. piston mechanics. Many divers prefer diaphragm regulators for its smooth movement and its moving parts are less * Balanced vs. unbalanced regulators. Almost all regulators are balanced. Do not buy an unbalanced regulator. * Always buy new. Do not pick up a cheap second-hand regulator; it may be faulty or reconditioned * Look for a warranty * Swivel joints on the second stage offer improved ease of movement * Hose should be soft and flexible "

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

1 Answer

Do I need a scuba regulator and if so, how do I know which one to buy?


"Because the scuba regulator is such a vital piece of gear many scuba divers choose to buy their own scuba regulator instead of renting one from the dive shop. When a scuba diver has used a few different scuba regulators, on numerous dives, he will notice that they all have slightly different ""action"" - some feel looser or tighter, some will deliver air more forcefully, others will have a slight ""suck"" to them. The goal of all regulators is the same: to deliver air on demand at ambient pressure. Comfort with a scuba regulator depends on how the diver breathes; which is different for everyone. Though a helpful clerk at the dive gear shop can recommend ""the best"" regulators, from the most respected manufacturers, in truth no one can tell you which regulator ""feels right"", except you. Sponsor Links [what's this?] As a novice scuba diver renting or borrowing equipment from a dive shop always take note of what scuba regulator you are using and whether you like how it feels. When you find the one which makes your breathing feel effortless remember its make and model. When you decide to buy your own scuba regulator you will know which one to get. When shopping for a scuba regulator here are some things to consider: See our choices for scuba regulators * Ergonomic design and easy to hold * A purge button which is easily pressed even when wearing 6mm neoprene gloves * External controls which let you make fine adjustments to air flow * Non-corroding metals like titanium or chromed brass * Diaphragm vs. piston mechanics. Many divers prefer diaphragm regulators for its smooth movement and its moving parts are less * Balanced vs. unbalanced regulators. Almost all regulators are balanced. Do not buy an unbalanced regulator. * Always buy new. Do not pick up a cheap second-hand regulator; it may be faulty or reconditioned * Look for a warranty * Swivel joints on the second stage offer improved ease of movement * Hose should be soft and flexible "

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

1 Answer

Scuba Gauges what do I need them for?


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity and length of decompression stops and to calculate residual nitrogen for repetitive dives. The time of a dive is easily tracked using a scuba diving watch and the depth is tracked using a depth gauge. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Scuba boots / booties maintenance


" 1. Rinse your booties in clean, freshwater after each dive and allow them to dry thoroughly before storing. After a div, your booties will be covered in a salty residue and/or dirt. This must be rinsed clean to prevent the neoprene from degrading. Your scuba booties must be completely dry before storing to ensure the neoprene stays clean, odor-free and free of mildew or mold. 2. Scuba bootie zippers should be lubricated occasionally to prevent degradation of the metal or plastic. 3. Always store your scuba booties out of direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will break down the neoprene after years of exposure. 4. Periodically machine or hand-wash your scuba booties. A good rinse after each dive helps to keep your booties clean, but to ensure there is no residue or grit left on your booties you must properly clean them on a regular basis. You can purchase a commercially prepared neoprene shampoo, zipper lubricant/desalter and a neoprene sealant to thoroughly clean and seal your scuba booties. A commercial shampoo and sealant are specifically manufactured to care for your neoprene and is the recommended method for proper maintenance. 5. Any holes in the neoprene on your scuba booties can be fixed using a commercial wet suit cement. "

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

1 Answer

Scuba Gauges importance


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity a

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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