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I have a 240 volt electric garage heater manual just has one black wire and one white wire and a ground wire.i hooked the two hot wires from thirty amp breaker to these two lines along with ground and nothing. then i hooked it up to 120volt with one hot wire and white wire with ground and worked with little heat.do i hook both hot wires off 30 amp breaker to were it says black in manual.and white and ground to. will that get my 240 volts.

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No, as long as the heater on the label says 240 volts. You would hook up your 240 v to black and white wire

Posted on Nov 30, 2008

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I have a new heater with diferant terminals from the old one so not sure how to atach the wires


There is no need to rewire the internal of the heater!
Just bring in the electrical supply to the heater, it can be either 120 or 240 volts.
If the heater you have is like the picture associated with your post, then all then have to do is change the supplied plug from 240 to 120. It comes pre set for 240. That plug is inside the cabinet.

If any other brand, then you need to change the wires at the transformer of the heater. All heaters need to be supplied with primary voltage: 120 or 240. Then the control system is supplied with secondary voltage out of the transformer. The secondary voltage is no more than 28 volts. and these wires are normally colored as blue or yellow.

Secondary power is already wired within the heater. NO need to change where they are. You will only need to deal with the Primary wiring.

There are many varieties of transformers that transform high primary voltage to a low secondary voltage of 28 volts. and these transformers have many wires: primary & secondary.
I will try to make this easy to understand.

If you have a Gas Heater Transformer with these colors:
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or...
  • Red
  • White with Red Stripe
  • Black
  • White with Black Stripe
  • Green
These are Dual Voltage Transformers, you can bring in either 120 Volts or 240 Volts

If you bring in only 120 Volts...
1st example:
The Red wire will not be used! Hot wire to the Black, and the Neutral/Common, to the white wire. Green to ground.

2nd example:
Connect the Red wire with the White with Red Stripe together and connect these to the incoming Neutral/Common wire, normally White.
Connect the Black Wire with the White with Black Stripe to your incoming Hot Wire, which is normally Black.
Green to ground

If you bring in 240 Volts...
1st example.
1 Hot wire to the Red, the Other Hot wire to the Black, and White wire is not used. Green to ground

2nd Example:
Wire nut the two Striped wires together. then one incoming Hot wire to the Black, the other incoming Hot wire to Red.
Green to ground

Or This is only a Low voltage - 120 Volts Only
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or either any of these combinations...
  • 2 Blacks w/Green
  • 2 Reds w/Green
  • 1 Black, 1 Red w/green
This type will only be a high voltage, 240 volts only
Picture below is what a transformer looks like and it is where your incoming supply wires go. The smaller leads with the spade connections will go to a specific location & is the 'Secondary" .

Good Luck



25568369-di2jpn2pb5nzkrgf0hzbmyq5-3-0.jpg

Mar 14, 2015 | Pool & Spa

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

I have 240 timer switch and I wana use it for 120 ? How can I do that?


if the switch is rated for 240, then hook up the same way but use the 110 black and white wire for 110 volts to switch, instead of the red and black wire for 240 . on 110 black wire is always hot and the white is the neutral wire. the best wire to use is 12/2 with ground.

Jun 20, 2011 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Haw do i hook up the wires corectly for a hot water heater


I am assuming this is a large 240 volt water heater and you are asking about the connection at the water heater. First thing is to turn the power to the water heater off at the service panel of disconnect if it has one. You will see three wires that connect to the heater. Normally a white, black, and a ground that is usually green or just a copper wire. On the water heater when you remove the plate on top you will have 2 wires. A red & black or a white & black. You will see a ground screw. Connect the green or copper ground wire to that screw. The 2 wires left you connect either one to either wire. Makes no difference as each wire is carrying 120 volts. When you connect these wires secure them tightly with a wire nut, no wire exposed, and then, with electrical tape, tape them up so as the wire nut cannot come off. Push the wires back into the hole an secure the cover on top.

Jan 10, 2010 | Intermatic & Indoor/Outdoor Rain Tight...

1 Answer

I have the Fahrenheat Model FUH 724 heater. The manual states that it can be wired as a 240v 7500W unit but the directions and the unit itself only allow for three wires to be connected Black, White, and...


1st you will belucky if you actually have 240 v, most
homes are usually 220v. In youyr case you need to start at the breaker panel.

This is an example:
You have a Double Pole Single Throw breaker. Black
Wire is hot and goes into one side of breaker,if you havea red wire that goes into the other have of the
breaker.

The white wire ties in the nuetral bar and the bare wire into the ground bus bar. At the unit you hook up the red and the black wire which will supply the 240
Volts, you could tie the white and the ground wires together into the grounding terminal

Jan 01, 2010 | Fahrenheat Ceiling-Mount Industrial Heater...

2 Answers

I am trying to replace a electric baseboard heater that is 220 volts and I am unsure about the wiring. the heater has a red and black wire and there is a white and black wire coming out of the wall.How do...


if ur are replacing the heater and it was originally 220/240 ur wiring should b ok but to b sure trace the line wire back to breaker panel and look at breaker the white and the black should b hooked up to separate breakers if the white is hooked up to a ground bar usually on the inside side of the panel and the black hooked up to breaker ur line is 110/120 and will cause problems when hooked up. if the lines r 220/240 than red can hook up to white and black to black

Sep 25, 2009 | QMark FBE15002 electric baseboard heater...

1 Answer

Wiring hook up in the back for whirpool dryer


assuming you are referring to the power hookup,there is no positive negative, (it's not D.C.) red and black are the hot lines(240 volt between them) white is neutral and green is equipment ground.voltage reading should be 120 volts from red or black to white as well as green, 240 volts from red to black, 0 volts from white to green

Sep 08, 2008 | Whirlpool GEW9250 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Baseboard heater connect


I have a fahrenheat F2548 baseboard heater, there were not any wiriing diagrams or installation instructions in the box where can I find the wiring diagram,

Aug 04, 2008 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

2 Answers

Install and hot wire heater


You can be assured that the element is 240 volt. The fan motor is also rated at 240 volt. the wires you have black - black are the connections you make to the line. Use a 12/2 with ground. Use a double pole 20 breaker in your panelbox. The green wire is the equipment ground - connect this to the bare wire from the 12/2. On the 12/2 cable - there will be two colors, one black and one white. Wrap a couple of turns of black tape on the white wire both at the heater location and on the white in the panelbox. connect the 12/2 to your 2 pole breaker, the black wire and the taped white to the breaker.

Sep 05, 2007 | Fahrenheat FFH1615 Heater

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