Question about Hampton Bay 24750 Huntington III Ceiling Fan

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Wiring in a new speed switch

My niece had pulled out the power off/3 speed chain cord out of the fixture. Before I could see the wiring they had taken it apart. I bought a new switch. Inside there is a orange wire on one side, purple, gray and yellow on the opposite side of some sort of switching assembly. The grey is already attached. I have one black power wire. The new switch has one black, one red and one blue wire. Is there a wiring diagram I could get to properly put in the new switch?

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  • pabloamador1 Dec 11, 2008

    I have the same problem, but i found out that the black wire went on the L side and the other colors, I have no idea can some one help me. Wire colors that are left red, purple, yellow,grey.

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Not likely.  This is a procedure...not a solution.  First, check the switch out with an ohm meter.  Four pulls will put the switch in off/1,2  and 3.  Find the one that conducts through on all the speeds except off.  You'll hook that to the black.  Note which one is first, second and third in order.   You'll need to know that.  Take the black power wire and hook it to any of the fan wires...other than the white.  Note the speed you get.  Do the others.  Now, connect the switch wires appropriately to re-establish your speeds.  Tape connections before each trial to minimize hazards.

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

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This is much simpler than it sounds, but if you're a total novice you'll need to read it all.

First, make sure power to fixture is off. Best method is to locate circuit breaker or fuse that controls that fixture's power. At minimum shut off the wall switch to it if there is one.

Next, remove the old fixture. Usually there are two screws or decorative nuts holding the base cover (canopy) on. On ceiling pendant fixtures there may be a retaining ring holding up the canopy, unscrew this ring counterclockwise and the canopy will drop over the support chain, exposing the junction box where the wires are connected.

It is critical at this point that the power is off.

Modern house wiring and fixtures are connected with three wires.
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For simplicity I will call the three: Green, White and Black.

The next step requires you to carefully pull the wires out of the junction box and isolate the black, white and green wire connections from each other. Make sure the connectors (wire nuts) for each connection are accessible.

Warning: With old or over heated wiring, take extra care not to crack or disturb the insulation(wire covering) on any of the wires. If insulation is crumbling away exposing bare wire, stop and call an electrician! Do not turn the power back on until he has repaired those damaged wires, they could start a fire.

Isolate the connection between the black house wire and black fixture wire. Remove this wire nut. At this point I usually use an electrical tester to double check that the power is off by touching one side to the newly exposed black connection and any grounded metal part nearby.
(Note: some multiple switched (three way) circuits may use a white wire as a power wire. If the black fixture wire is connected to a white house wire, mark that white house wire with black electrical tape for future identification.)
Once you are positive there is no power at the fixture junction box remove the connectors from the white and green wires.

Detach the old fixture and it's mounting bracket.

Re-attach the new fixture using bracket and new connectors that are usually provided. Some brackets have a green ground screw. Wrap the bare ground wire clockwise around that screw and tighten it down leaving enough remaining ground wire to attach to the fixture ground.

If the wires to the new fixtures do not have a 1/2 inch of exposed bare wire at the ends (stripped) you must do so. I use a wire stripping tool but you can do it with a sharp knife being careful not to nick the metal wire.
Once the wire tips are stripped, hold the tips of each color pair together side by side, slip the wire nut over them and twist clockwise until snug. (White to white, black to black etc.)
Take care that the new wire nuts are secure at each connection. Do not over tighten them but insure that they are correctly attached by gently tugging on each wire. When completed the black and white connections should have no exposed bare wire showing.
The Green (bare copper) wire is there for safety and never carries current, hence exposed wire is not an issue on ground wires.

Assemble and attach the new fixture according to instructions in the box.

Pendant ceiling fixtures usually require additional assembly steps including adjusting chain height, looping wires through the chain and slipping retaining nut and canopy over chain prior to connecting. Always follow directions that come with the fixtures.

When in doubt, call a professional. Electricity is dangerous.

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The wiring on most paddle / ceiling fans id such:

White = Fan and Light neutral or "common"
Black = Fan line voltage or "hot"
Blue = Light line voltage or "hot"
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If you are replacing an existing light fixture - be sure to replace the ceiling box with one designed for use with a fan - as per electrical code. If the existing box had only 2 wires (or 3 counting the ground) that connected to the old light fixture and it was controlled from a wall switch, the wiring would be fixture white to ceiling white, fixture black and fixture blue to ceiling black (or red) and fixture green to ceiling bare ground or connected to the metal box. This would power both the fan and light whenever the wall switch was on and the pull chains for each were also on. This is also the preferred wiring for replacement of a pull chain type light fixture (no wall switch present).

If there are other wires in the box that previously were not connected to the old light fixture, using a meter or tester - determine if there is constant power between the ceiling white wire and any of the these other wires (test with the wall switch on and off to be sure). If you do have constant power available, you might consider using the wall switch to control only the light, and using the pull chain to operate the fan (or vice-versa). Simply connect the black (for fan) or the blue (for light) to the "constant power on" wire and that part of the fixture will work by pull chain only - regardless of the wall switch position. If the fan can be shut off by the wall switch, it is very important that the wall switch remain a toggle (or on / off switch), do NOT replace with a dimmer type switch.

If you'd prefer to operate the fan and light completely independently of each other - you can purchase a 3rd party fan & light remote control device for between $30 - $50.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thanks!

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1 Answer

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Shut off the power. Loosen the screws on the cover or canopy that that will allow access to the wiring compartment in the ceiling. LOOK for anything obviously loose. You may need to have someone hold the fixture once you remove it from the hanger to see the connections - or simply disconnect the fixture wires from the house wiring completely. There may be 2 or 3 wires besides any bare or green ground wire that supplies the fixture. Photograph or otherwise mark the wires before removing the fixture wires.

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If there was no power in the ceiling earlier when the power was restored, there is a break elsewhere between the power source and the ceiling box. You'll have to look in switch boxes and outlet boxes in the room and possibly adjoining rooms to find the loose connection. It may even be in an adjoining room's ceiling box, too. This is a labor intensive job - and can take some time to locate and repair. Take your time and only turn power on when ready to check for the presence of power.

Of course, you could call an electrician to do the work for you. I hope this was helpful - good luck!

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Connect the paddle fan's blue wire to the switched wire, the black wire to the unswitched wire(s), the white wire to the other neutral (most likely white wire(s) and finally, the ground wire to the rest of the ground wire(s). Turn power back on.

Wiring in this way allows the light fixture to be controlled by the wall switch(es) and the fan by the pull chain on the fixture. Turn the wall switch on and pull the chain until the light turns on. You can remove the long chain once the switch turns the light on and off so it is not accidentally shut off at the paddle fan later. Change the fan speed from high to low and eventually off with the chain.

If you only have a switched or unswitched power source in the ceiling, you'll have to connect both the black and blue paddle fan wires to whichever type power you have in the ceiling (switched or unswitched). If you're using a switched sourced, that switch will have to be left on in order for the fan or light to work.

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that is strange
normally a 3 wire switch could only be able to control 2 things + off. black would be common, red would be one fan speed or set of lights and blue would be the other fan speed or set of lights.
if it is a replacement, couldn't you just hook it up like the switch you are removing?

most likely the black wires are grounds for everything and white would be power. hook it up however you like. white power would hook up to the black wire on the switch and then the blue to one light and red to the other set of lights white wires.
good luck!

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Sounds like the fan is defective. All internal wiring from the switch to the motor is factory installed. The fan has power going to it. Just to make sure, double check the wiring from the ceiling fixture to the fan.
Problem could be a faulty switch on the fan or faulty motor(bad winding for med. speed). Try reverse switch on the fan to operate the opposite direction and see if medium speed works. If medium does work in opposite direction, it pretty much points to a defective fan. In any case, unless you discover that the ceiling wires were reversed going into the fan, I'd say new fan to the returns dept.

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Open the fixture where the switch is and see if the chain is broke or just needs a connector to put the chain back together. If you can't do this,just take switch to a place that would sell them, hopefully
you have a hardware store,I hate home depot. Cut the 2 wires,
install new switch, connect wires, wrap with elec tape.

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