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I have a Leitz Wetzlar Summicron 1.2 50mm lens with a frozen focal ring. Is there any way to fix this short of dismantling the entire lens?

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Try a drop or two of lighter fluid on the seam. it should loosen it. The lube is caked and the fluid many times liquifies it. (go easy with it.) Leicamatt

Posted on Jul 24, 2009

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Fixing a seized AF motor


One theory on this is that the camera's software or settings may somehow be corrupted, so you should go through the process of resetting the camera to its original factory settings. If that does not clear up the problem, try another AF lens and conform whether the problem is the lens or the camera body. If the camera is not focusing another lens, then you may need to clean the contacts or look for some sort of damage.

If it turns out that it is the lens, the best solution is to send it to Tamron for service and see what they can do about it.

If you cannot send it to Tamron, you ought to see whether it is something as simple as some sort of internal dust or dirt collection blocking the mechanical switches and functions of the lens.

Start with making sure that you have a fully charged battery for the camera or AC power adapter for the camera. You do not want any of the problems with the camera to be related to having too little voltage available.

Make sure that the camera's power switch is switched off. You do not need to have the battery or adapter connected just yet.

Next, with the lens off of the camera, switch back and forth several times, firmly, between AF and MF and switch the vibration compensation off and on a few times. Of course, do not drop the lens. Also, unless you need the zoom ring locked, you may want to make sure that the zoom ring lock is fully off. While you are doing this, or after switching back and forth, check the electrical contacts on the lens and the camera body. If anything looks even a little less than shiny, clean the contacts.

With the camera's power still switched off, put the lens back on the camera.

Either put the battery in the camera or connect the AC adapter.

Set the lens to AF with vibration compensation off.

Switch the camera's power on.

Try getting the camera to automatically focus on something. If it works, turn the camera's power off, then switch vibration compensation on, then turn the camera's power on and try again. It may be fixed, at this point, which means that you can ignore the rest. Otherwise:

Turn the camera's power off again and switch to manual focus. Turn the camera's power back on and rotate the lens's focus ring (gently) all of the way through the focal range two or three times. Try taking one or two pictures, just to be sure that everything is working in manual. Turn the camera's power off and switch the vibration compensation, then turn the camera's power back on. Gently rotate the focus ring all of the way through the focal range two or three time, and then take two or three pictures to verify that everything is still working in manual.

After that, turn the camera's power off and switch back to AF with vibration compensation off. Turn the camera's power back on. Try to get the camera to automatically focus on something. If it works, then turn the camera's power off and switch vibration compensation back on again. The turn the camera's power on and try to get it to automatically focus on something.

If all of this works, than you should be okay with it as it is. You may still want to send the lens in to Tamron to get it serviced, in case the problem was some sort of lint or dirt getting caught up in the gears or servo that moves the lens through the focal range.

If it does not work, you could try to force the lens to re-engage the autofocus servo. It will probably void your warranty, if you still have one, so you are better off send it in to Tamron for service, first, before trying it. Also, as the manual and common sense would indicate, if you try to force the lens to adjust its focus ring while it is switched to AF, you could easily break the mechanism in the lens.

With that being said, some people claim that they got their lenses to return to proper autofocus by leaving the lens switched to AF and trying to rotate the focus ring manually. One person says not to "force" it, his just took a "firm push". I have not tried this, so I do not have advice on how much force may work or how much will damage the plastic bearings, gears and teeth inside the lens.

May 04, 2014 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is 55-200mm?


That's the focal range of a zoom lens. Unlike a single focal-length lens (or a "prime" lens) a zoom lens lets you adjust the focal range. "55-200mm" specifies the lens's focal range from 55mm at the low end to 200mm at the long end.

You can read a general description of zoom lenses at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoom_lens

Nikon current has two different 55-200mm lenses:
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Products/Product/Camera-Lenses/
2156/AF-S-DX-Zoom-NIKKOR-55-200mm-f%252F4-5.6G-ED.html
and
http://www.nikonusa.com/Nikon-Products/Product/Camera-Lenses/
2156/AF-S-DX-Zoom-NIKKOR-55-200mm-f%252F4-5.6G-ED.html

If you're asking about the L110, it has a permanently-affixed lens and will not use either of the above lenses.

Aug 11, 2011 | Nikon Coolpix L110 Digital Camera

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I want to take a picture that is focused on the subject, while everything else in the picture is blurry


What you want is a limited depth of field. There are three factors that control the depth of field: subject distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The greater the distance, the wider the DoF. The shorter the lens, the greater the DoF. The smaller the aperture, the greater the DoF.

One problem with compact cameras is that they have very small sensors. This means that they have short lenses. And short lenses mean they have wide depth of field. This is often an advantage, in that more of the scene is in focus. Unfortunately, this works against you when you don't want a wide DoF.

At the short end, the S2's lens focal length is 6mm. This will put just about everything in focus. Even at the other end, the focal length is 72mm. With a 35mm film camera, most portrait photographers use lenses at least 85mm in focal length in an attempt to minimize DoF to draw attention to the face and blur the background.

Unfortunately, the best you'll be able to do is to set the camera to the portrait mode, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in as much as possible. I realize the last two conflict with each other, you'll just have to find the proper balance for whatever you're photographing.

Nov 18, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to blur the background in picture taking?


Get another camera :-(

You want to reduce the depth-of-field so that the subject is in focus while the foreground and background are out of focus and blurred. Depth of field (DoF) is dependent on three factors: distance, lens aperture, and lens focal length.

The farther the subject, the deeper the DoF. If you take a picture of a distant mountain peak, the mountain behind that and sunlit the clouds on the horizon will also be in focus. If you get close enough to a flower, you might get the front petals in focus while the petals in the back might blur.

The smaller the lens aperture, the deeper the DoF. Landscape mode, for example, will try to use a smaller aperture in order to get everything in focus while portrait mode will try to use a larger aperture in order to blur the background.

The shorter the lens focal length, the deeper the DoF. This is the killer. Due to the small size of the image sensor, the EX-Z750 has a very short lens: 7.9mm to 23.7mm. Even at the telephoto end of the range, 23.7mm would be considered very wide by film photograpers. A 24mm lens would give film photographers a sharp shot from foreground to horizon and, unfortunately, you're seeing that as well.

Note that the DoF is dependent on the actual focal length, not the 35mm equivalent you may have read about. This is a law of physics, not something that lens designers can easily alter.

Mar 04, 2010 | Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am trying to take pictures of pennies and I can't get the camera to focus and get a clear picture. Do you have any ideas?


All cameras have a minimum focal length. That is the minimum distance they have to be from an object in order to focus clearly. If you have a digital camera with changeable lenses, that minimum focal length is determined by the lens and how it is constructed. If you have a fixed lens digital camera then the manual should tell you what the minimum focal length is.

One other thing to keep in mind is that on most fixed lens digital cameras, there is what is called a macro setting. If you switch to macro mode, it will allow you to get closer to the object and still get a good focus. Your manual should tell you how to turn on that mode.

Dec 31, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Canon xti low lighting


In low light you need a high ISO setting, probably 1600.
You also could do with a lens with a low F number to let in lots of light. You can get a fixed focal length F1.8 cheap but might find the lack of zoom a problem.
A decent zoom with a low F number is going to be expensive.
The EF-S 17-55mm F2.8 IS for instance has a list price of around £800 / $1200 !!
You can get a non-Canon one which would be more affordable and you also won't need the IS at short focal lengths (although it always helps). Have a look at Sigma and Tamron in the F2.8 to F4.0 range but check the online reviews to make sure they are of reasonable quality.

Nov 01, 2008 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

What type of lens does the DiMAGE 5 use?


The DiMAGE 5 offers a 7x high power zoom lens, with a focal length of 7.2 - 50.8, which in 35mm equivalent equals 35 - 250mm. A manual zoom ring controls the optical zoom. The DiMAGE 5 has a maximum aperture of f/2.8 - f/3.5.

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE 5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Lenses


Focal Lengths for the C-2000/C2020 Zoom Adapter CLA-1 Step-Up Ring F/L+1 +1.6X +2X 2.5X B-Macro Yes Yes (43-55mm not incl. w/lens) N/A N/A N/A N/A B-28 Yes Yes (43-55mm incl. w/lens) 29mm N/A N/A N/A 1.45x 150mm Yes Yes (43-46mm incl. w/lens) 150mm 245mm 300mm 375mm

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-2020 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Lenses


No, the wide angle and telephoto extension lenses are specifically designed only to extend the focal length of the existing E-10/20N lens. Their specific purpose is to be a fixed focal length.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia E-20N Digital Camera

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