Question about Toshiba Satellite A55-S306 Notebook

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Overheating when plugged in to mains

My laptop overheats/screen flickers when plugged into main power source. It is ok when just using battery, but I have to power off to recharge it.

4 months ago the screen/backlight died. This has been replaced. The transformer was also replaced.

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Their is a clear sign that the converter has gone corrupted ,,,,it is a hardware issue

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

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Screen is dim when power not plugged in


In power settings you will find the dim adjust, Your laptop has power settings you can adjust to your preference. That said, the default settings are usually set to a power saving that means when you unplug your laptop from th AC source your laptop will dim to the power savings settings and prolong battery life. Look in power settings by right clicking the power icon in the taskbar notification area and open the power options. There are many options to choose from I use High Preformance, but on battery it shorten battery life. If you need assistance just respond to this solution.

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Got a dell latitude d520 charges battery ok will not power up with mains plugged in only works on battery power any ideas


Hi there!

Your laptop is working with just the battery but not with the main power. This issue you have here is usually caused by a motherboard problem but have you tried to remove the battery then try to turn on computer? If it works then you might just need a BIOS update for the computer of not then there's a high chance that the motherboard your using is having a problem using the main source.

Hope this helps!

Sep 07, 2011 | Dell Latitude D520 Battery PC Notebook

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Battery does not charge is their any easy fix that is not - buy a new battery please?


Hi shaun par914...

If you have an ohm meter, check you ac adapter ouput to make sure it has electricity at the plug and is not defective.
Sorry, Otherwise if it is working, then you must replace your battery as there is no fixing a defective battery.
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My laptop sony vaio will not hold a charge for very long.


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Sep 02, 2011 | PC Laptops

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My Dell says it doesn't recognise my new battery, and tells me that I should press F1 and that it won't be able to charge it, but it then does appear to charge it ok, although the light at the...



Hi

You don't say which Operating System you use.

A new battery needs a good, long charge for only the first charge. After that, charge until it is fully charged. The battery charge icon at the bottom right of the screen, near the clock, will tell you the state of the battery, by floating the mouse over it. If you have no icon, right click on the Task Bar, bottom of screen > properties > notification area > tick 'power' > apply > ok.

The likely cause of the original battery fault and the key to what to look out for in future with the new battery is a very common mistake in the way laptops are used. A laptop battery, working at optimum efficiency, whether of the older Nickel Cadmium and Nickel Metal Hydride or newer Lithium Ion types, is meant to charge under power and then discharge under use, if it is to have a long and useful life. This means that it should be used in a similar way to a cellphone's battery - connected to mains electricity and charged up when low or flat and then disconnected from the power and used on battery power alone until the power level means the cycle needs repeating. Many people, however, unwittingly use their laptops like desktop PCs and leave the mains electricity connected to it even after the battery is fully charged. The reason that people cite for doing this is 'convenience'. This, however, is a mistake.

Laptops have more flexibility than cellphones in that, if they are mainly used in one place rather than as mobile devices, then it is possible to charge the battery to full capacity, disconnect from the mains, then remove and keep the battery until the next time the laptop's mobility function is required (periodically recharge the stored battery if not in use for long periods of time because the charge slowly dissipates when not in use), reconnect the mains to the battery-less laptop and use it like that, ad infinitum.

When a laptop battery is fully charged, what it really wants to do is discharge. However, maintaining the mains connection prevents it from doing so. The
power management system on the motherboard is designed to cope with long periods of either battery powered or battery-less mains powered use, but not long periods of simultaneous battery + mains powered use. A fully charged battery still connected to mains electricity has no means of discharging and various power sensitive components such as the Power Inverter, Cold Cathode Backlight, LCD Panel and Graphics Chip can become damaged by the power bottleneck created.

Using the battery in this wrong way also gradually depletes the charging capacity of the cells, until eventually, the cells can carry no charge, meaning a dead battery. A dead battery, where the cells are depleted, left in the laptop with the mains connected, is even worse for the Power M
anagement System because the flow of power to the motherboard via the dead battery cells is inefficient and intermittent, creating battery overheating, low CPU Cooling Fan speed, inferior cooling and consequent internal overheating hazards in addition to potential electrical damage to several components.

Loose DC jacks, leading to intermittent power drops and surges, are typically caused by the jack being allowed to take the weight of the heavy transformer box on the laptop's power cable. The solution is to ensure that the laptop is never held, carried or used with the transformer hanging unsupported. If the laptop is in use, the transformer should be disconnected, carried, placed on a desk or table near the laptop (if the cord is short) or laid completely full-weight-flat on the floor (if the cord is long enough).

Also, always use a Surge Suppressor/Surge Protector between the mains power socket and all Co
mputer equipment, never directly to the mains.

When battery cells are dead, a replacement battery is required and should be bought and installed as soon as possible. In the meantime, the old, dead battery should be removed and the laptop used (battetyless) on mains power alone.
Manage the new battery and the AC/DC Adapter in the way described above and you should hopefully avoid similar problems in future.

I hope this helps. If this answer does help you, please take the time to rate it. This helps answerers better understand the needs and the point of view of the asker and guides us in exploring the best ways to provide useful, high quality answers. If you need further help, please feel free to post another question or add a comment to this question. Thanks for using FixYa.

Sep 02, 2011 | Dell Inspiron Mini 10 Notebook

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I bought A sony VAIO VGN-TXN29N when i plug the system battary its blinking and its not charging please advise what can i do regards


The likely cause of this problem is a common mistake in the way laptops are used.

A laptop battery, working at optimum efficiency, whether of the older Nickel Cadmium and Nickel Metal Hydride or newer Lithium Ion types, is meant to charge under power and then discharge under use, if it is to have a long and useful life.

This means that it should be used in a similar way to a cellphone's battery - connected to mains electricity and charged up when low or flat and then disconnected from the power and used on battery power alone until the power level means the cycle needs repeating. Many people, however, unwittingly use their laptops like desktop pcs and leave the mains electricity connected to it even after the battery is fully charged. The reason that people cite for doing this is convenience.

However, laptops have more flexibility than cellphones in that, if they are mainly used in one place rather than as mobile devices, then it is possible to charge the battery to full, disconnect from the mains, then remove and keep the battery until the next time the laptop's mobile function is required (periodically recharge the battery if not in use for long periods of time because the charge slowly dissipates when not in use), reconnect the mains to the battery-less laptop and use it like that, ad infinitum.

When a laptop battery is fully charged, what it really wants to do is discharge but maintaining the mains connection, prevents it from doing so. The power management system on the motherboard is designed to cope with long periods of either battery powered or battery-less mains powered use, but not long periods of simultaneous battery + mains powered use. The battery has no means of discharging and various power sensitive components such as the inverter, backlights, lcd panel and graphics chips can become damaged by the power bottleneck created.

Using the battery in this wrong way also gradually depletes the charging capacity of the cells, until eventually, the cells can carry no charge, meaning a dead battery. A dead battery, where the cells are depleted, left in the laptop with the mains connected, is even worse for the power management system because the flow of power to the motherboard via the dead battery cells battery is inefficient and intermittent, creating battery overheating, low fan speed, inferior cooling, internal overheating hazards to the potential electrical damage to several components.

Loose DC jacks, leading to intermittent power drops and surges, are typically caused by the jack being allowed to take the weight of the heavy transformer box on the laptop's power cable. The solution is to ensure that the laptop is never held, carried or used with the transformer hanging unsupported. If the laptop is in use, the transformer should be disconnected, carried, placed on a desk or table near the laptop (if the cord is short) or lain completely full-weight-flat on the floor (if the cord is long enough).

Also, always use a surge protector for computer equipment, never directly to the mains.

If the battery cells are dead, you require a replacement battery.

If either the Motherboard Power Management System or DC Jack are damaged, your laptop requires professional specialist repair by a Component Level Laptop Repair Specialist, providing No Fix No Fee, Warrantied Repairs ( typically 3-6 months Repair Warranty).

When you get your laptop back after the repair, manage the power in the way described above and you should hopefully avoid similar problems in future.

Also check for any damage to the cable where it joins to the transformer box. Also, obviously check for blown plug fuses.

Hope this helps

Aug 02, 2011 | PC Laptops

1 Answer

My HP pavillion ZD8000 laptop will not operate on mains power. To recharge the battery the machine has to be upside down. There would appear to be a loose connection wher teh mains adapter plugs in to teh...


Check the power adapter with a multi-meter, the voltage of the power plug that plugs into the power socket on the laptop should be slight higher than the voltage that is printed on the label on the adapter.
If it is faulty, there are replacement power supplies available on the Internet or at your friendly computer shop.
If the adapter is OK then the power socket on the laptop is faulty or this socket has a dry solder joint connection on the motherboard.
You can test this by wriggling the power plug when it is connected to the laptop, if the charge LED flickers and if you hold this plug in a certain position the charge LED stays on without flickering, then the power socket is faulty.
This can be repaired, but requires the laptop to be completely
disassembled. I suggest you get a quote first.

Sep 10, 2009 | PC Laptops

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My Ibm T22 wont boot up


Try removing the battery and unplugging the computer. Then put the battery back in and plug the computer in and turn it on.

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Ei systems 4411 wont power on/mains or battery power


If the fan does not spin, the unit is shutting down to protect the processor. I would have the fan replaced . Do not attempt to use the laptop, it may cause extensive damage if it overheats.

Joe

Oct 30, 2008 | PC Laptops

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