Question about Keytec Sony Multiscan E500 21 in. CRT Monitor

1 Answer

Black color displayed as green

I have 21" Sony Multisan E530. The black color is displayed in different levels of green - light, dark, bright. It's especially irritating when I watch films, because the dark borders in the top and the bottom of the overlay are green instead of black.

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  • Anonymous Mar 05, 2008

    I have the same problem with a Planar monitor. I pulled the cable off the monitor and still got the green screen behind the "NO SIGNAL" message. At least I know my pc is ok.





  • Anonymous Dec 24, 2008

    I have the same problem with a laptop's LCD screen...will try hooking up an external moniter and see what happens to see if it's the LCD itself, or the graphics hardware....This is coming from a computer I got for my mother, it has Windows XP and ATI graphics, and ATI didn't even install the Catalyst CC because .NET Framework wasn't installed, so now I have to install that over my mother's dreadfully slow internet connection...this moniter thing is not what I need right now.

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If the owner's manual covers it, I would do a factory reset on it. I would also test the PC and video card by trying another monitor to be sure. I would check the pins for ones which are bent or broken, and check the cable for pinched spots. After that, I would say the monitor has a bad signal / video board in it.

Posted on Jan 15, 2007

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How to turn off backlight on iphone 4


There is no separate "back light" setting like there used to be on some earlier phones.

In the Settings app of your iPhone, there is a section called "Display & Brightness". You can use that to make your phone's display brighter or dimmer, but as you have probably discovered, it dims or brightens both the foreground and the background elements together as one.

You can turn it all the way down, which is very dim and hard to see in normal indoor light conditions, but may be preferable in extreme low light conditions like in a nightclub setting, or in complete darkness.

Why isn't there a separate back light setting?
To fully answer this, I would probably have get into more than you ever wanted to know about displays.

First, there is really no background or foreground on today's smart phone displays. The foreground elements and background elements we see on the iPhone are really a graphic illusion created by lighting individual pixels with different colors. All of these pixels are on the same plane, so nothing is really behind or in front of anything else. It's just artistically drawn to look that way.

Brightness is simply an "intensity" setting applied uniformly across all of the underlying individual pixels within the display matrix, and has no relationship to color. For clarity, let's look at the difference between lightness in colors, versus display brightness:

COLOR LIGHTNESS is a matter of how much WHITE (all the RGB colors summed, for example) is present in a given color. This has nothing to do with display brightness.

DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS is a matter of how much LIGHT INTENSITY is applied uniformly across all pixels in the display matrix.

At zero display brightness, you would not see white any better than black, blue, green, red or any other color. You wouldn't see anything.

Why did you expect to be able to control the back light?

Prior to the smartphone era, the displays on early cell phones and pagers (and lots of other devices that had displays) had a lighted background that contrasted with dark foreground elements.

The background intensity was a separate setting on those devices, but that's because the background was the only thing that had intensity. The foreground elements were solid black LCD (liquid crystal display) segments that were used to form characters and very simple graphics and lines.

Everything we see on today's smartphone displays is dynamically drawn by lighting different pixels with different colors at different times. Individual pixels on a Retina display are nearly microscopic in size--they cannot be separately discerned by the eye.

Imagine a matrix of microscopic light bulbs, each of which can separately change to any of millions of colors and levels of brightness at any time, on command. Just imagine the sheer number and complexity of possible commands to control a Retina display!

Even if Apple wanted to provide a new feature that enabled us to separately control the perceived "back light", it would only be an illusion as well.

Such a feature would require some sort of complex algorithm to determine which pixels are involved in what you perceive as the "foreground" elements at any given time, so it could add intensity only to those pixels considered to be "background" at any given time.

Since "foreground" and "background" elements drastically change shape (and location) at any time, such a feature would be pretty daunting to implement.

You might be better off using a pure black graphic as your background image if your goal is to have more contrast to make the app icons stand out.

Cheers,

-=Cameron

Aug 12, 2014 | Apple iPhone4 4G iPhone 4

1 Answer

I just need to adjust the resolution on this TV. NO ONE at RCA could seem to help me. Thank you.


hi,
did u mean to adjust the picture setting then go for the following
1 press menu on the remote
2. using down arrow select picture quality and press ok. available options in picture quality and its use is listed below. you can use it according to your preference.

Basic Picture Control- Displays the five slider controls for adjusting

the way the picture looks.

Contrast Adjusts the difference between the light and dark areas

of the picture.

Color Adjusts- the richness of the color

Tint Adjusts the balance between the red and green levels

Black Level Adjusts the brightness of the picture

.

Sharpness Adjusts the crispness of edges in the picture.


When exiting this menu, the Save Personal Picture Preset choice list will

appear. You can choose either Yes or No. If you save the settings as a

Personal Picture Preset, the TV will store the settings so you can reselect

them easily if someone changes the settings.

Picture Presets Displays- a choice list that lets you select one of three

preset picture settings: Bright Lighting, Normal Lighting, Soft Lighting

or Personal Picture Preset. Choose the setting that is best for your

viewing environment.

Auto Color Displays- a choice list that lets you turn on the feature that

automatically corrects the color of the picture. (This is especially useful

for tracking realistic flesh tone colors as you switch from channel to

channel.) Choose On or Off, depending on your preference.

Color Warmth Displays- a choice list that lets you set one of three

automatic color adjustments: Cool for a more blue palette of picture

colors; Normal; and Warm for a more red palette of picture colors. The

warm setting corresponds to the National Television Standards

Committee (NTSC) standard of 6500?K.

Video Noise Reduction Displays- a choice list that lets you turn on the

feature that automatically reduces noise from the picture. Audiovariable

enables the TV to automatically adjust noise reduction level;

off turns off noise reduction feature; on-fixed sets a fixed level of noise

reduction.

Dec 21, 2010 | RCA G36705 36" TV

1 Answer

I have sony 50E200A,there is problem with colour combination/mixing....green colour is too bright.please tell me how to resolve this problem.thanks


You need to calibrate the colors

The first step in calibrating your television lies in paying attention to your surroundings. Sit in the same spot you'd normally sit in to watch your TV. Then, make sure the lighting is at the same level you'll be using to watch movies: setting your TV to overcompensate for a brightly-lit room may give you distorted results. Watching in complete darkness may cause undue eyestrain, but a dim, diffuse light behind or to the side of your LCD TV is best. Just make sure to avoid any glare or reflection on the screen.

Next, be sure your display has "warmed up" for at least a half hour before attempting any calibration; this is to ensure that all the components of the display are at normal operating temperature and best approximate normal viewing conditions. You can take this time to familiarize yourself with the various display controls on your particular TV--get the manual out if you have to. The better you know which controls are available on your LCD TV, the better your end results will be. Though different manufacturers give different names to the controls, these are the levels you'll be adjusting:

  1. Black Level, normally found on the Brightness control
  2. White Level, usually called Contrast or Picture
  3. Sharpness, or sometimes Detail
  4. Color Saturation, usually labeled Color, or maybe Chroma
  5. Color Tint, also known as Hue

Beyond these basic settings, many modern TVs come packed with so-called "picture enhancements" which in reality do nothing but spoil an otherwise accurate, lifelike picture. Take a moment to dig through your TVs menus and disable any of these "features." What you're looking for is anything labeled edge enhancement or detail enhancement, flesh tone or color "correction," etc. This is a broad generalization, but basically anything not listed in the five controls above can be safely turned off. Another thing to check for is often called a "Picture Mode," or something similar: in reviews, we often find best results from a Movie or Cinema mode, which usually gives the most accurate picture with the least "enhancement." A Normal mode is a safe bet when this isn't available, but definitely avoid anything called Vivid, Dynamic, or Sports mode.Sports mode may make the grass look nice and green, but unless you're watching The Masters, it's probably not that green in real life; Sports mode is just ruining the color.

On a similar note, have a look at the options available for your LCD TV's backlight settings. Like many of the settings, the backlight is probably set to its highest brightness, which is probably too bright for comfortable extended viewing, and shortens the lifespan of your LCD TV as well. Drop this setting down at least to it's "normal" value, or even try out the Low Power or Power Saver option if it's available (in dimly lit rooms).Finally, a word about Color Temperature. Without getting into the rather complicated science behind it all, Color Temperature basically refers to the peak wavelength of a light source, which affects the color tint given to images which should be "pure" white. Suffice it to say that while most video is produced to what's called a "6500K Standard," (6500 degrees Kelvin), not every TV comes out of the box set to display that standard properly. In fact, factory settings are very rarely are set close to 6500K.

Dec 12, 2010 | Sony Televison & Video

1 Answer

A Dark Bar at the top of the screen that looks pink against white


the light engine is defective if you have black bars that look pink.

Sep 05, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KDF-42WE655 42" Rear...

1 Answer

I have a sony kdf-46e2000, there is a pinkish stripe on the top and bottom of the screen, what is causing that?


Looks to me as an serious (but not uncommon) PSP board problem with Sony plasmas. Contact a Sony service center.

What problems have people had with quality control on these displays? Are they covered under warranty?
  1. Certain displays emitted an extremely loud buzz. This was covered by warranty repair.
  2. Certain displays had a problem with the Y/C delay on their S-video input. This was also correctable.
  3. One person reported red vertical lines on his display. Was this covered by warranty? Was it an input problem or a pixel problem?
  4. Afew bad pixels here and there are not covered under warranty. Largeclusters are generally covered. It's up to Sonys discretion. On the plus side, however, bad pixels are becoming increasingly rare. Mostpeople are reporting no bad pixels at all!
CALIBRATINGWhat needs to be calibrated on a plasma?
You needto calibrate most of the same things that need to be calibrated onother displays. About the only things that don't need to be done areconvergence and geometry. You can usually tinker with picture size andposition, but there's no need to deal with keystone or pincushionadjustments, etc.What is white level? What is black level? How are they adjusted?
Theadjustment for white level is usually labeled "Picture" (as onPanasonics) or "Contrast". "Brightness", on the other hand, refers tothe black level. Yes, this is apallingly counter intuitive. This FAQuses the terms "white level" and "black level", since they betterdescribe what you're actually adjusting, and they're the terms used byAvia and Video Essentials.
How do I adjust hue and saturation?
In another mysterious choice of terms, hue is controlled by the "Tint" setting,and saturation is controlled by the "Color" setting. This FAQ uses theterms "hue" and "saturation", since they're the terms used by Avia andVideo Essentials.
How do I set the white level on a plasma?
Youset the white level by adjusting the "Picture" setting. You will needto use a different test pattern than you would for a CRT. For both plasma displays and LCD displays, you should use the 10 IRE grayscalestep pattern. There are two criteria you want to match on your plasma.
First,you need to make sure the white level is low enough that your displayisn't thresholding (or clamping) bright levels. You should set thewhite level low enough that you can see each of the 10 IRE stepsdistinctly. The Sony seem not to exhibit clamping (in my limitedexperience), even at factory defaults, so this criterion may not beterribly useful.
Second, for the health of your display (e.g.to avoid burn-in), you should turn down the white level. Just becauseyour display can display blindingly bright pictures doesn't mean that it should. Plasma displays should be set between 21 fl and 25 fl light output; the Sony comeout of the factory at about 30 fl. On one ISF-calibrated Sony, 23fl was roughly equivalent to a Picture setting of -20 (in the usermenu, not the service menu). To set this precisely you'll need to bringin a calibration specialist, but you can do a lot of good by justdialing down the white level a lot. After seeing the display at 30 fl,23 fl will see very dim. But after a while, you'll find that 23 fl isplenty bright.
How do I set the black level on a plasma?
Youset the black level by adjusting the "Brightness" setting. You can usethe same test pattern you would use for any other display.
How do I calibrate grayscale (calibrate the color temperature)?
Unfortunately,this is one you can't do yourself. You need special equipment tomeasure the color. In fact, most ISF technicians lack the equipmentspecific to plasma calibration (a $15K gadget known as aspectroradiometer). But even the standard color measurement equipment(which calibrationists do have) will do a great job.
Thatsaid, one person who had his Sony display calibrated by an ISF specialist said that the Cinema / Warm setting was reasonably close to6500K out of the box. Using that setting is probably the best you'll doon your own.
If you're really determined to screw up yourdisplay, the RGB drive and cutoff settings in the service menu are used to adjust the color temperature.
How do I adjust the color decoder?
There are several issues here. Generally speaking, the Panasonic decoder seems topush blue a bit. The R-Y Axis Angle and B-Y Axis Gain in the servicemenu are used to correct this behavior.
There used to be aproblem on some Panasonics with the Y/C delay on the S-video input. Seethe Quality Control section for more information.
How do I adjust the gamma?
On the industrial model, there is a set of Advanced picture settings. Go to the Picture menu, turn Advanced on, and then hit the down-arrow. In the subsequentmenu you can adjust quite a few parameters, including select from a fewgamma settings.
This advanced menu appears to be missing from the consumer model.
How do I calibrate my consumer model given these missing menus?
Thereis apparently a way to activate these menus. Perhaps you can find acalibrationist or Panasonic technician would can turn them on longenough to do the calibration.
What's the overall calibration procedure?
In general, the order Avia sets out is the correct one. A more complete list is:
  1. White level (picture)
  2. Black level (brightness)
  3. Repeat (1) and (2) until you have a good balance.
  4. Grayscale (requires special hardware and mucking about in the service menu)
  5. Sharpness
  6. Hue and Saturation (tint and color)
  7. Color decoder (requires use of the service menu)
  8. Repeat (6) and (7) for red and green until you have a good balance.
SERVICE MENUHow do I access the service menu?
In a word, don't. See the service menu warningabove. If you're bound and determined to make use of the service menu,buy the service manual. It contains more than enough information foryou to ruin your display and/or kill yourself.

Aug 18, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KDF-42WE655 42" Rear...

2 Answers

42" sony plasma wont power on


I don't think Sony makes a Wega Plasma. Sony did make a plasma about 7 years ago but it wasn't Wega. Are you sure it's not Grand Wega SXRD or Lcd type

Apr 13, 2009 | Sony Grand WEGA KF50WE610 50" Rear...

1 Answer

Pictures appear to be darker than original in print outs.


You can make several adjustments to improve your images such as lightening dark areas, changing the exposure, sharpening blurred edges, and changing the brightness and contrast.
  • Exposure adjusts the overall intensity of light in an image.
  • Adaptive Lighting improves only the dark areas in an image without affecting the bright areas.
  • Brightness adjusts the amount of light in colors ranging from light to dark.
  • Contrast adjusts the difference in brightness between light and dark areas of an image.
  • Sharpness helps define edges and the smoothness of texture in an image. Use this tool to make a blurred image appear more focused.
Adjusting the image Follow the steps below to make adjustments:
  1. Click the View tab and select the image you want to edit by either clicking the image, or by clicking the small box at the bottom left corner of the image. Figure 1: Select the image c00603524.gif
  2. Click the Edit tab and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. On the Advanced tools tab, click Adjust Image .
  4. Select an adjustment from the list on the left. Figure 2: Adjusting the brightness c00603525.gif
    • The Exposure adjustment is automatically applied when the Adjust Image tool opens. Eight variations of the image are displayed on the left. The current image is displayed in the center. Each image represents a different level of adjustment. When you move the pointer over any of the images on the left, a large version of the image is displayed. Use Preferences to turn this large image preview on or off and to set the timing for the display.
    • If you want to use a different adjustment tool, select Adaptive Lighting , Brightness , Contrast , or Sharpness from the list.
  5. Select one of the images on the left.
  6. Do one of the following:
    • Click Accept to accept all changes and exit from the Color Toolkit.
    • Click Cancel to discard all changes and exit from the Color Toolkit.
  7. If you have finished modifying the image, do one of the following to save your changes:
    • Click Save to overwrite the original image.
    • Click Save As to save the modified image with a different name.

Aug 25, 2008 | HP Photosmart D7160 InkJet Printer

1 Answer

Red , Green And Blue.


Heres the best way to set a phillips screen controls. Go into the picture controls and set picture or contrast to roughly 75%, then set brightness to 50% and then set the color level completely off. Then adjust the screen with the 3 color controls untill you recieve the best black and white picture as possible. If you are unable to achieve a good black and white picture change the coolant in the green and blue tubes. But if you can get a good black and white picture stop there then turn your color level back up and the picture should be correct. Let me know if you need further assistance.

May 22, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Sony E530 focus (?) problem


I think it can solve with this way:

Press Menu on the front panel of the monitor. Then press OK button and go down and go to COLOR : PRESET. Press OK and go down. Press IMAGE RESTORATION.

My E530 monitor is more clearly, now.

L.E.

Sep 23, 2007 | Sony Multiscan E530 (White) 21" CRT...

1 Answer

Screen went dark


Sounds like the screen control which is usually mounted in your high voltage transformer (Flyback) has opened up. Stargazer

Jan 10, 2007 | Sony KV-27S20 27" TV

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