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Hi, I have a Nikon D40. I do not know how to adjust the F-stop scale to be equivalent with the shutter speed. What is a simple way of memorizing the chart?

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IT IS CA;LLED AN EV CHART . iF YOU RAISE THE SHUTTER SPEED ONE NUMBER THEN THE F STOP WILL GO DOWN ONE NUMBER
1/60TH TO 125TH SHUTTER SPEED EXAMPLE
F8 TO 5.6 FSTOP .. SEE HOW THEY CHANGE .
ALSO THE EV CHART IS IN THE INSTRUICTION D40 BOOKLET .

Posted on Nov 29, 2008

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I have a Nikon D40 and when it's in M and S mode the shutter stays open for too long and my pictures come out completely white.


What shutter speed(s) are you using? What happens when you use a faster shutter speed? In the S and M modes you are responsible for setting the shutter speed, and you can set it to anything within the camera's range.

Aug 28, 2013 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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How slove the problem


Introduction

Specifications Recommendations

The Nikon D60 is an inexpensive 10 MP DSLR that comes with an excellent 18-55mm VR lens for about $650 as of June 2008. It was a announced in January, 2008, and sold for about $750 with lens in February 2008.

The Nikon D60 is a replacement for the almost identical D40x.

Personally I prefer Nikon's least expensive D40 over the D60 or D40x. The D60, D40x and D40 are actually exactly the same cameras, differering only slightly in their internal electronics, but differing greatly in their prices.

The D60 is actually a D40 body with a few more card-clogging pixels, a VR lens and adaptive dynamic range, but a slower maximum shutter speed with flash.

The D60 is less sensitive to light then the D40 (its default ISO is only ISO 100 compared to the D40's default ISO of 200). Its less sensitive to light because the pixels have to be made smaller to cram more of them into the same-sized sensor. Smaller pixels collect fewer photons than larger pixels. Since the D60 is half as light sensitive, the D60 has to use twice as long a shutter speed or a larger aperture, which makes it more likely to make a blurry picture than the D40. OOPS!

Save your money and get the D40 instead. The D40's faster sync speed is invaluable for use with flash outdoors, and the extra light sensitivity in normal use will help make sharper pictures. These three cameras (D40, D40x, D60) otherwise, for most users, are identical. Compare them in person and you'll see. Megapixels don't matter.

(I detail the few fine points which are new in the D60 further below.)

I had my hands on a D60 back in January 2008. The D60 is an excellent camera, but for most of the people who will buy it, it's the same thing as the $300 less expensive D40. I'd suggest getting a D40 and putting the $300 towards more lenses and/or a bouncable flash.

In fact, the faster flash sync speed (the fastest shutter speed with flash) is more than twice as fast in the D40 (1/500 vs. 1/200), and along with the faster base ISO, the D40 is more likely to make sharper photos for most people, for hundreds of dollars less!

The only significant feature in the D60 over the D40x and D40 is adaptive dynamic range. The D60 does not have any of the other next-generation functionality of the D3 and D300.

The D60 is just a D40 with more pixels, but slower shutter speeds with flash outdoors and less basic light sensitivity due to the smaller pixels needed to jam more of them onto the same-sized sensor.

I make excellent 12 x 18" (30 x 50 cm) prints from my 6 MP D40; do you plan to print bigger? Really? The resolution makes no difference unless I'm printing at 20 x 30" (60 x 80 cm) or more.

Since the D60 costs $300 more than the D40, I'd much rather have a D40, 1/500 flash sync for better daylight fill-flash range, a minimum ISO of 200 and $300 left over to buy lenses and an external flash that I can bounce for better lighting. For instance, the D40, 55-200mm VR and SB-400 is a far better way to spend the same $750.

Sep 19, 2011 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Slow sync flash - nikon d40


Set the exposure mode to Manual (M) or Shutter-priority (S) and specify the shutter speed yourself. You'll have to set it sufficiently slow in order to see any difference between front- and rear-curtain.

Mar 02, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera

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I have a NIKON D40 and want to shoot on MANUAL MODE and taking pics of my son's basketball game and NOT getting clear pictures, what settings do I use for that?


Based on the following descriptions: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/ND40/ND40MENUS.HTM
I'd say use the little person running, or 'Sports' mode. This basically chooses a high (fast) ISO and fast shutter speed, in attempt to let the most light in and reduce the exposure length to reduce blur.
Hope this helps.
Oh, FYI, manual mode is very useful...if you find a shutter speed and f-stop (aperture) that works for your setting -- which can be seen in the viewfinder or on the status LED on the top of the camera -- you can set the camera to those settings and know that the shots should turn out well, where any 'automatic' type setting is very convenient, it has the potential of adjusting the lighting based on the wrong 'subject' of the photo and leaving you with a under or over-exposed photo. Best of luck!

Jan 04, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

When taking sport(footbal) pictures they are coming out blury


Set your D40 to S(shutter Speed) mode. Adjust the shutter speed to at least 1/250 of a second. Try that. Also, buy the book Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. He does a great job explaining the meanings behind all the settings.

Sep 26, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

2 Answers

Friday Night Lights Blur


Congrats on the D40! It is a great camera! Best buy out there for a DSLR. You can spend more, but for the money you can't get a better camera.

I've been shooting football games from the sidelines for four years with a Nikon D70, which is almost the same camera as the D40.

For shutter speed, you'll need to use a maximum of about 1/350. With the lighting at most high school stadiums, you won't likely be able to get enough light at this shutter speed with the "shooting modes".

You need to set:

ISO to 3200 (max)
Program mode to "S"
Shutter speed to 1/350 or maybe 1/500. The 'S' mode will keep the shutter speed where you set it and vary the aperature to control exposure, as best it can.

This will give you photos at most locations with the 18-55 that are a bit dark, and you'll need to adjust the lighting in whatever software you use. If this gets you photos that are acceptable at your location, you can stop here.

But if not, then you'll need to move to some more complicated "tricks".

I could describe some techniques, but Ken Rockwell has a good explanation of how to do this on his website (you also may find it useful for general photography hints).

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d5000/high-iso-comparison.htm#3200

And then look at where he talks about "pushing".

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/photoshop/pushing-iso.htm

Ken also talks about setting ISO to 6400, which can be done on this camera. You'll need to work with removing the grain (noise) afterwards, though.

If you're using the 18-55 and are happy with the zoom, then you could potentially switch to the straight 50mm f1.8 lens that Nikon sells for about $120. This won't autofocus on the D40, but the f1.8 will get you far better low light capability. The 50 is easy and fast to focus manually.

You could also go after the 80-200mm f2.8, which goes for about $800 new or $500 on ebay. Again, you'd have to manual focus, but the f2.8 will get you way more light into the camera.

If you post what you are using for lens and give a general idea of what you use for software, I can point you some other places that will show how to deal with noise and also lighten your exposure if you need to.

Sep 19, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

3 Answers

Nikon D40 shutter speed problem


The D40 will not take great photos of an indoor event without blurring or noise. You need a fast lens and a high ISO using the popup flash or on camera flash would be ideal but some of these events you can not use flash. All these images I shot with a Nikon D40. http://www.facebook.com/home.php?src=fftb#/pages/Keller-TX/Raving-Design/78762448229?v=photos&ref=ts Learn to use the camera for ur events. Experiment it's all about trial and error. Ray

Dec 20, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Shutter action


You will need a 3rd party software software to check the number of Shutter actions/release. Check this site.

Jun 06, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

2 Answers

Nikon d40 digital camera


When the camera is in auto focus mode, it will not take the picture until it locks onto a subject. If there is not enough light, the camera will "hunt" for something to focus on. Since it can't define any edges, it won't allow the shutter to release.

The D40 base model does NOT have a powered focus lever for autofocus, so if the autofocus is not working, suspect the lens.

Mar 23, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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