Question about Kenmore Dryers

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No hot air

Changed all the thermostats,fuse and heating element.
Checked all wires,fuses, heating element , thermostat for electric current using a voltage indicator . All have an electric current going through them.Sometimes the indicator will show a 120v and sometimes 240v , but still the dryer works but no heat.

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Possible voltage issue be sure you have steady 240 at 2 outside screws on ac connection next ck timer quick ck unplug dryer remove console cover short large red and black wires together plug back in and turn on ..possible motor switch ..contacts in motor switch close as motor runs supplying one side of element with other 110 volts

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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Kenmore combo not heating, tested a lot of stuff no luck yet.


Have you checked the relay switch. It is located under the top. It is about the shape of 8quarters stacked up . Remove the wires and bound together and if it works then then replace it. It is crucial in preventing a potential fire. It blows when there is too much current or it gets too hot. This leads to another issue, make sure you have the vent pipe clear and that the motor turning the drum is turning freely. All this builds up heat and electrical resistance.

Mar 13, 2013 | Dryers

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KNOWING ABOUT THERMOSTAT.


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} What is a thermostat?
A thermostat is a device for regulating the temperature of a system so that the system's temperature is maintained near a desired set point temperature. The name is derived from the Greek words thermos "hot" and statos "a standing".
What is a dryer thermostat?
A dryer thermostat is usually oval shaped and about an inch and a half in length. The thermostat contains a bimetal that opens and closes a pair of contacts depending on the temperature inside the dryer. The bimetal inside the thermostat is designed to bend at specific temperatures. When the bimetal bends, it pushes an actuator. The actuator then pushes on a contact, opening the electrical circuit and breaking the electrical connection to the related component. When the thermostat cools, the bimetal returns to its original shape and the contacts close, allowing the current to flow through the circuit.
Have you ever thought about how hot your dryer gets? Thermostats and thermal fuses are put in dryers for your safety and if you don't maintain them, you could be putting yourself, your house, and your family at risk.
Your dryer uses of a combination of heat and airflow to dry your clothes. The heat generated in your dryer is produced by a heating element controlled by a series of thermostats. If any of your dryer's thermostats are defective, the results can be disastrous.
Here's how it works: The dryer is turned on and heat begins to radiate from the heating element into the dryer's drum. The air in the drum passes by a thermostat. As the thermostat reaches its maximum temperature, the bimetal bends, cutting the power to the heating element. The circuit stays open until the bimetal cools. Because the heating element isn't providing additional heat, the dryer's temperature gradually falls. The bimetal returns to its original shape and the electric current flows to start the heating element again. This process happens many times throughout your dryer's cycle.
There are at least two thermostats in your dryer: cycling (operating) thermostat and hi-limit safety) thermostat. The difference between these two thermostats is their opening and closing temperatures.
The cycling thermostat is typically found in the path of the air leaving the drum. A cycling thermostat is usually found on the fan housing or just under the lint filter area, on the blower wheel housing or inside the venting/exhaust system.
Some dryers may have as many as five thermostats - one for each of the different heat cycles. The temperature setting or cycle selected determines which thermostat is used to control the heat. If your dryer is malfunctioning on the low heat setting, the thermostat for that particular setting is probably defective.
The thermostats for the high and medium temperature selections are not the problem. However, if the dryer isn't working properly for most of the heat settings, it's probably a problem with your vent rather than the thermostats.
The hi-limit thermostat protects your dryer from overheating. This thermostat is usually found on the heating element, housing, or cage assembly. If the airflow in the dryer becomes obstructed by a plugged or improperly installed vent, bad drum seals, or a defective blower, the high-limit thermostat cuts power to the heating element. This means there are other problems with your dryer.
In conjunction with thermostats, dryers use thermal fuses as a safety device. Some dryer models may have two thermal fuses to detect extreme heat. If the hi-limit thermostat fails to cut power to the heating element and the element gets too hot, the thermal fuse blows and cuts all power to the dryer. This could mean that a thermostat is defective or something is wrong with your venting duct, filters, seals, or blower. You cannot reset thermal fuses so once they blow they must be replaced. Get the proper replacement fuse for your model and replace the hi-limit thermostat as well. Never bypass a thermal fuse.
Have a look at your dryer's manual for the locations of its thermostats. It's unusual for a dryer's thermostat to continue operating at a different temperature than originally intended and the only way to test for this would be by checking the temperature of the exhaust. You can do this by placing a pocket thermometer inside the exhaust vent. This test is done with the dryer running, so be extremely careful.
Checking continuity is another way to test your thermostat. There's a wire leading to each of the thermostat's terminals. The wires are connected by metal slip-on connectors. Label the wires before you remove them so that you're able to correctly reconnect them later. To remove the wires use needle nose pliers to pull on the connectors - don't pull on the wires themselves.
Set your multimeter to the RX1 setting. With the thermostat at room temperature, touch one meter probe to one terminal and touch the other meter probe to the other terminal. You should receive a reading of zero. If a thermostat is tested when it's heated to its limit, a reading of infinity should be produced. You should replace your thermostat if it fails either of these tests.
The thermostat is attached to the dryer with two screws. Remove both screws and discard the faulty thermostat. Install a new thermostat, securing it in place with two screws. Reconnect the two wires, put your dryer back together, and restore power to the dryer. Run your dryer through a cycle to make sure it's working properly.
Safety Warning: Before performing any tests or repairs on your dryer disconnect the power source to eliminate the risk of electric shock. You can do this by unplugging the dryer, removing the related fuse from the fuse box, or flipping the appropriate switch on the breaker panel.
For better protection of your family and yourself - maintain your dryer regularly. But if you can't do it yourself, make sure you contact a qualify service technician to do it for you. www.victorwod1234.blogspot.com

on Apr 08, 2010 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

The Dryer is running too hot (red hot) and not turning off or running it's cycle.


You want to do a few things to correct this. First make sure your air flow is good. then replace the cycling thermostat. That stat is mounted on the blower housing right next to the fuse:
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I recently worked on a dryer that was doing this exact thing and I replaced the control thermostat.
My friend Larry brought it by because it was overheating and he had already changed the fuse once.
I always see the tough or the strange. LOL. Anyway I took the dryer completely apart and cleaned it up real good. Replaced the fuse and observed the dryer with the back off. I watched the heating element and it just stayed on way too long. Normally you can hear the control clicking and observ the element coming on and off. The cycling thermostat has 4 wires. 2 small wires and 2 large wires. The large wires carry the current to the heater element. The 2 small wires are use to warm up the klixon so that it will shut down even faster for knits and perma press items. So what goes wrong? The bimetal inside the control simply gets fatigued and don't shut down no more. The dryer overheats and the fuse blows.

themobilian_3049.jpg

Oct 21, 2011 | Whirlpool Inglis IP8200 Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer will not get hot


Hi

Replace the thermal fuse, and if possible test the heating group (thermostats and element or gas heater). You can replace the fuse straight away, or you can first test it using a multimeter set on OHMS. If the multimeter reads Ohms infinity when you touch the fuse contacts with its probes, then the fuse is gone.
If the fuse is OK, then you can have a defective thermostat or heating element (electric models), with gas models you test coils, thermostats and ignitor (flame sensor rarely fails).


After fixing the problem clean lint from air ducts, if the thermal fuse or thermostat has blown it means that there had been overheating.

May 08, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer drum works but does not heat. Everything else works. I have checked the fuse and I have made sure it is not on air dry.


THERMAL FUSES MAY BE THE CAUSE OF THIS In recent years the makers of dryers are using thermal fuses to let you know something is wrong with your dryer. They are generally non resetting and have to be replaced. The thermal fuses are located on the heater element housing and should read continuity if read with an ohm meter. Most blown thermal fuses are the result of vent/air flow problems or a grounded heating element. Follow the diagram below to see how to check the continuity of the switch, and look closely at the switch to see a fairly close idea of what you are looking for, ok

jim_james_43.jpg

OR it could be a thermostat.
Cycle and safety thermostats-read them with an ohm meter. Should show continuity .

or lastly, it might be
the Heat elements-Test heater element with an ohm meter. You will read continuity across a good element ( 8-12 ohms is an average element ).

IF you do not have an OHM-METER, then you can check these issues by following the directions below:

To check the thermal fuse - You can bypass the thermal fuse (just connect the 2 wires together) for testing purposes only.

To check the thermal cut-out - You can bypass the thermal cut-out (just connect the 2 wires together) for testing purposes only.


To check the thermostats for continuity - - You can bypass the thermostat (just connect the 2 wires together) for testing purposes only.

To check the Element: Try removing element and physically looking at the element wire for a break in the wire.


Do not forget to rate this answer!!

Jan 24, 2011 | Frigidaire Electric Dryer

2 Answers

I switched my Kithen Aid Electric dryer [KEYE664W] from mediun to high heat AND THE HEAT STOPPED! Now all temps have know heat. Blower works.


You may have had a short circuit between the heat selector switch and the element/thermostat!! Have a technician test the heat switch, and the element and thermostat.

Dec 14, 2009 | Amana NDE2330AY Electric Dryer

2 Answers

My kenmore electric dryer is not heating I checked the heating coil and it seems ok could it be one of the thermostats?


Kenmore style dryer - no heat problems:
Electric dryers - See the "how to take apart" section first if needed. Always check the power supply first...if one house fuse blows or 1/2 of the breaker trips, it is possible for the dryer to run with no heat. If you have a volt meter, you should read 240 volts between the red and black wires, 120 volts between the white and black and 120 volts between white and red, check for this at the main power connection. If you have 240 volts to the dryer, remove rear access panel, turn dryer on and test for 240 volts to the *heating element wire connections (#4). If you have 240 volts there and no heat = bad element, the element must be broken physically to be bad. If you have no power at the heating element, remove power, remove wires to the heating element and isolate them so that they can't touch anything. Reinstall power and check each wire for power from the wire to the dryer cabinet, one wire will probably show 120 volts and the other will show zero. Make note of the color or # of the wire that has no power, remove power to the dryer and check the wiring diagram that comes with the dryer to find out where that color or # wire goes to. EG: - wires might be yellow and red, if the yellow wire (example only) was the one that had no power, look at the wiring diagram to find out where that goes to and check only those parts, no need to check the other colored wire parts as they are working. Things to check are, *thermostats, timer contacts, selector switch, motor switch heat contacts ( 1&2 on the motor switch ) and *thermal fuse. If the wires to the heating element are the same color, just remove power after test and slowly follow that wire that has no power with your hand to see what parts it goes to. If live volt testing scares you, try the ohm checkinstead.
*#1-Thermal fuse that controls heat. If the dryer overheats, this fuse will blow. One shot fuse. Does not reset.
#2-Canister for the heater element.
#3-Hi limit thermostat. This thermostat is a safety thermostat in case the dryer severely overheats. When this safety thermostat is defective, it should raise a red flag for air flow problems.
#4-This is the terminals of the heater element that is inside the canister.
#5-Thermal fuse that controls motor run.
#6-Control thermostat. This is the thermostat that controls the cycling of the heater in high heat mode.
#7-Heater for low heat. When you select low heat, 110V is sent to this heater that the control thermostat sits in. The heater helps cycle the control thermostat faster, therefore you get less heat than the high heat mode.Things that could stop a electric dryer from heating:
- house fuse or breaker ( needs two of them ), heating element, burnt wire, thermostat(s), thermal fuse ( not all models ), motor heat switch, timer, selector switch, burnt power cord/plug.
A ohm meter test for these parts is here.


Jul 11, 2009 | Kenmore 62602 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer runs but will not heat. Replaced fuse and


your cycling thermostat needs changed too. the thermal fuse is your last safety measure that goes, which means your cycling thermostat is not shutting down the heat element once it detects the right temp hot air in the blower housing so it let the heat element glow until either the high-limit sensor shuts the heat down or the thermal fuse blows. Change the cycling thermostat and good luck

Mar 06, 2009 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

I have a Kenmore electric dryer that suddenly went ''poof'' (like when a light bulb that goes out). It threw the breaker. I reset the breaker and the dryer started. I thought that was all there was to it,...


Q - My electric dryer runs but will not heat, what could stop my dryer from heating?
A - Things that could stop a electric dryer from heating:
- house fuse or breaker ( needs two of them ), heating element, burnt wire, thermostat(s), thermal fuse ( not all models ), motor heat switch, timer, selector switch, burnt power cord/plug.
A ohm meter test for these parts is here.

Mar 03, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

Relaced thermostat and therma fuse, now dryer is tooo hot


Sound like the thermostat is not working bud first check and double check the thermostat is connected properly and the wires are on correctly (not mixed up)and check the stat probe or bulb is in the correct place to pick up heat(assumeing that the stat is not a energy switch wich has no bulb)If you are not sure where the wires go there should be a diagram on the inside of the back panel or go on line to the manufacturer site and get one from them,

Hope this is of some assistance

Jan 19, 2009 | Maytag PYE2300AY Electric Dryer

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