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How to send music data from my main drive which is labeled C drive to my second drive which is labeled D drive.

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D DRIVE IS PROBABLY YOUR RETSTORE DRIVE AND HAS ALLTHE FILES YOU NEED TO RESTORE YOUR PC TO ORIGINAL FACTORY SETTINGS CREATE YOUR RESTORE DISCS.

you may not have a second physical drive on the pc, but just one hdd with 2 partitions. c drive is the main partition, d would be the restore partition.
if the pc came with restore cds, go to my computer and check for the size of the drives c & d. but you would be better off using either an addtional external/internal physical hdd or cd/dvds to store them files on.
to actually save them do this:
select the file, right click, choose, send to, and select the destination You have the added option of creating a seperate folder for the destination where it will go to. once the copy is finished, you may delete the original, or keep it. just be sure to check that the copy is working properly before deleting the original file/folder.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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The easiest way to do this would be to select the file/s by left clicking on them 1st and then right cllick on the selected file/s, click on "copy", Open your "D" drive, right click anywhere on the "D" drive and then click on paste.

Thanks.

Posted on Nov 27, 2008

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We have a Zebra 105SL thermal printer. When I print to it with any application, the data light comes on, but it doesn't print. It has ribbon, media, calibrated, no error lights


The data light indicates that the printer is receiving data. Hold the cancel key for 10 seconds while powering on. This will print printer configuration. Use to troubleshoot. If the data or format is wrong it will not print as you send data. Make sure you are using the 105SL printer driver. To test the printer functionality you can go to www.teklynx.com and download a demo copy of labelveiw, select the 105SL printer and try to print a simple label. If you can print with labelveiw then it is not a printer problem. Double check your driver and label format.

Nov 12, 2010 | Zebra 105SL Thermal Label Printer

Tip

You Cannot Put 700MB of Data on a 700MB RW Disc: Why?


You Cannot Put 700MB of Data on a 700MB RW Disc: Why?
(This also pertains to DVDs and Solid State Flash Media)

[The point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]

Lets start with RW media where this causes the most confusion:
You will never be able to format the entire 700MB of any RW media. The same is true for DVD RW media. This is because the formatting requires a file allocation table (FAT) be created, the formatted disc will be segmented into cylinders (circular sections of the disc) referred to as tracks and that is further divided into Sectors. The FAT contains columns and rows that containing information on exactly where data is stored by referencing track and sector within the FAT. The file may span many sectors and be across several tracks. The data and the table takes up a lot of room. A good and easy example of this is a floppy disk. If you have a floppy disk you will notice on the diskette drawer slide it states it is a 2MB diskette, however, when formatted you only have roughly 1.44MB of usable addressable space. The same is true for any formatted RW CD or DVD.

Can this be Different between Media Maker Companies?
Simply stated: No.
Just how much space is available after formatting a RW disc on your system sometimes depends in part on the software used to format the disc. But this will never be different enough between media makers to amount to much. The exception is preformatted discs you may purchase off the shelf. Those preformatted disc may vary from maker to maker.

How about Software driven Burner Programs?
In CD RWs, for example only, the common assumption is that 545MB will be available for data storage. Every software program may be slightly different; each software burner producer reserves the same, more or less space than another. This difference will be slight, if noticeable at all.

How about CD/DVD-Rs then?
Additionally, but aside from RW media. You cannot place 700MB of data on a 700MB CD-R. Room is included on the media for file sector information and label data for Start of File and End of File markers. Each piece of data that comprises a file on the disc, RW or R, has information that is part of a label such as (although greatly simplified) part 2 of 200. I'm not overly simplifying this by example but it is close enough for an average layman to get a grasp of how this works. Each part of a file broken down by sector size (more on this in the next paragraph) on your disc has a marker to indicate which part of the whole it comprises. Your computer uses this data to reconstruct the file when you open it or copy and paste the file. When moving or sending files these parts of a file are referred to as packets.

Space Loss From Sector Size
Another reason for 'space lossage' on RW media is that when formatted, each sector may be 8K, 16K or 32K in size. However, the last sector in a string of sectors for a file rarely fills in the full 8 / 16K or 32K of space. Lets say, for example, that the last sector only has 4K of data and this is an actual average for your RW disc. You end up loosing 4,12 or 28K of space for each and every file on the disc. So in reality you have the 545MB of available space plus the loss of data in the last sector of a series of file segments. When there are a lot of file written to a RW disc, the lossage adds up real fast. Does this also apply to CD-R media? Yes, and can have a dramatic affect. On a 700MB CD-R you will never be able to put 700MB of data on the disc for this reason.

The Same is Also True for Hard Drives on your System
Another good example of this loss of storage size as advertised is with a Computer Hard Drive. A 500GB Hard Drive will not even come anywhere close to the advertised usable space once it is formatted, but when you see your drive in the System, it will be labeled and described as a 500GB drive.

How about Music CD and DVD MP3s?
Music CDs are quite a bit different but and not the same for DVD MP3 discs which are data discs.
When you purchase a CD Disc labeled as a Music CD, it is preformatted for music only. And I'll describe this method shortly. And as a result will not store data.

Music tracks on a Music CD are laid down much like a vinyl album, in one continuous groove that swirls across the entire disc media. At the beginning and end of each track on a Music CD is data, called Meta Data that contains information about the track title and artist/album. As just described for each track holding data pertaining to track title and artist/album, you cannot fit exactly 700MB of music you listen to later. Additionally, the industry standard is to included two seconds of silence between tracks titles, but still on the same continuous groove that comprises the entire Music CD.

Is this True for Solid State Removable Disks like Compact Flash?
Yes, and for the same reason already stated above pertaining to CD/DVD-RWs. When the Flash Media is formatted it also contains a FAT and the media is formatted with Tracks and Sectors. Files written have to have package labels and are formatted into there sectors and where the last sector is occupied with data that is usually less than the sector size and thus it will never be filled up to its maximum capacity.

[As stated earlier, the point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]


Authors note: As needed, for corrections or additions to this topic I will add notes to this Tip below as comments.
If you need or wish to contact me you can reach me from the Ask button found here or at http://www.fixya.com/users/worldvet/

on Oct 19, 2008 | Dell (7W036) DVD+RW Burner

Tip

You Cannot Put 700MB of Data on a 700MB RW Disc: Why?


You Cannot Put 700MB of Data on a 700MB RW Disc: Why?
(This also pertains to DVDs and Solid State Flash Media)

[The point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]

Lets start with RW media where this causes the most confusion:
You will never be able to format the entire 700MB of any RW media. The same is true for DVD RW media. This is because the formatting requires a file allocation table (FAT) be created, the formatted disc will be segmented into cylinders (circular sections of the disc) referred to as tracks and that is further divided into Sectors. The FAT contains columns and rows that containing information on exactly where data is stored by referencing track and sector within the FAT. The file may span many sectors and be across several tracks. The data and the table takes up a lot of room. A good and easy example of this is a floppy disk. If you have a floppy disk you will notice on the diskette drawer slide it states it is a 2MB diskette, however, when formatted you only have roughly 1.44MB of usable addressable space. The same is true for any formatted RW CD or DVD.

Can this be Different between Media Maker Companies?
Simply stated: No.
Just how much space is available after formatting a RW disc on your system sometimes depends in part on the software used to format the disc. But this will never be different enough between media makers to amount to much. The exception is preformatted discs you may purchase off the shelf. Those preformatted disc may vary from maker to maker.

How about Software driven Burner Programs?
In CD RWs, for example only, the common assumption is that 545MB will be available for data storage. Every software program may be slightly different; each software burner producer reserves the same, more or less space than another. This difference will be slight, if noticeable at all.

How about CD/DVD-Rs then?
Additionally, but aside from RW media. You cannot place 700MB of data on a 700MB CD-R. Room is included on the media for file sector information and label data for Start of File and End of File markers. Each piece of data that comprises a file on the disc, RW or R, has information that is part of a label such as (although greatly simplified) part 2 of 200. I'm not overly simplifying this by example but it is close enough for an average layman to get a grasp of how this works. Each part of a file broken down by sector size (more on this in the next paragraph) on your disc has a marker to indicate which part of the whole it comprises. Your computer uses this data to reconstruct the file when you open it or copy and paste the file. When moving or sending files these parts of a file are referred to as packets.

Space Loss From Sector Size
Another reason for 'space lossage' on RW media is that when formatted, each sector may be 8K, 16K or 32K in size. However, the last sector in a string of sectors for a file rarely fills in the full 8 / 16K or 32K of space. Lets say, for example, that the last sector only has 4K of data and this is an actual average for your RW disc. You end up loosing 4,12 or 28K of space for each and every file on the disc. So in reality you have the 545MB of available space plus the loss of data in the last sector of a series of file segments. When there are a lot of file written to a RW disc, the lossage adds up real fast. Does this also apply to CD-R media? Yes, and can have a dramatic affect. On a 700MB CD-R you will never be able to put 700MB of data on the disc for this reason.

The Same is Also True for Hard Drives on your System
Another good example of this loss of storage size as advertised is with a Computer Hard Drive. A 500GB Hard Drive will not even come anywhere close to the advertised usable space once it is formatted, but when you see your drive in the System, it will be labeled and described as a 500GB drive.

How about Music CD and DVD MP3s?
Music CDs are quite a bit different but and not the same for DVD MP3 discs which are data discs.
When you purchase a CD Disc labeled as a Music CD, it is preformatted for music only. And I'll describe this method shortly. And as a result will not store data.

Music tracks on a Music CD are laid down much like a vinyl album, in one continuous groove that swirls across the entire disc media. At the beginning and end of each track on a Music CD is data, called Meta Data that contains information about the track title and artist/album. As just described for each track holding data pertaining to track title and artist/album, you cannot fit exactly 700MB of music you listen to later. Additionally, the industry standard is to included two seconds of silence between tracks titles, but still on the same continuous groove that comprises the entire Music CD.

Is this True for Solid State Removable Disks like Compact Flash?
Yes, and for the same reason already stated above pertaining to CD/DVD-RWs. When the Flash Media is formatted it also contains a FAT and the media is formatted with Tracks and Sectors. Files written have to have package labels and are formatted into there sectors and where the last sector is occupied with data that is usually less than the sector size and thus it will never be filled up to its maximum capacity.



[As stated earlier, the point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]


Authors note: As needed, for corrections or additions to this topic I will add notes to this Tip below as comments.
If you need or wish to contact me you can reach me from the Ask button found here or at http://www.fixya.com/users/worldvet/

on Oct 19, 2008 | Dell (0Y435) Internal 24x CD-ROM Drive

1 Answer

Not ditect SATA HARDISK


Hi
I know what is problem,some of mother is made only SATA HDD data transfer rate 1.5 GB per second.Now all are SATA HDD data read rate 3 up to g GB per second .Follow the instruction label on the hard drive.
If you use your Motherboard 3GB data read hard drive you can customise setting jumper source of data rate 1.5 then MSI Motherboard detect SATA hard drive.
Good Luck.

Nov 26, 2009 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Hard Drive Installation


Hi emceedrive, I gather you are using ATA/PATA IDE hard disk drives? Each hard disk drive has a large white sticker on it. Listed there are pin settings to set the IDE to Master or slave & Master with a slave. (We want to leave you're drive with windows on it alone). Not changing its jumper or not adding a jumper for now. We are not hooking up you're second drive just yet either.
Oh, please you're not an idiot either.
Unplug the power cable from the PC & open you're case.
Please open you're ASUS P4P800 SE manual to section 2.2.3 Motherboard layout. We want to connect the data cable to SEC_IDE1 first because once PRI_IDE1 is connected you will not be able to connect SEC_IDE1's data cable up to the DVD drive bay.
So grab a data cable for you DVD drive. It may have three connectors on it. Plug the connector that is the furthest from the other 2 connectors on the cable into the motherboard slot named SEC_IDE2. The data cable only goes in one way. Run the remainder of the cable up to the DVD player but do not connect it to the player yet. It is ok to fold the data cable which will help in routing it upwards to the DVD bay. Than connect the data cable to you're primary master IDE drive. (The one with windows already installed on it). The data cable should look just like the DVD data cable. Again you want to connect the furthest connector on the data cable into the MB slot named PRI_IDE1.
For now it’s best not to install the drive into the drive bay. Stand it up next to your case or lay it down flat with a sheet of paper under it. Connect the power cable to the drive. Plug in the PC's power cord & power up the PC & start pressing the delete key every two seconds until the bios main menu loads. You should see the Primary Hard disk drive listed at the main menu. Now go to the title Boot in the bios. Open boot order. The boot order of the devices should be as follows.
Boot device 1. (Floppy Disk Drive)
Boot device 2. (DVD Disk Drive) [None shown it’s not connected to the system].
Boot device 3. (Model number of your Primary IDE Master HDD).
Once this is set, save the bios & exit. The system should auto restart & windows should load. Let windows finish loading. Than shut down windows normally.
Unplug the PC's power cord. Since you had to remove a DVD drive you'll need to set the remaining DVD player's jumper on the drive to a Master & connect the data cable & power cord to it. (You may have to remove the DVD to see where the Master pins are located. It will be marked on the DVD player near the pins).
Now take you're new drive, do not insert it into the drive bay. Look at you're Master drive's white label. Set the jumper on the master drive first. It should be set as a Master drive with a slave.
Connect a jumper for this.
Go to you're new drive. Again look at its white label. Set this drive's jumper as a Slave drive. The Master drive should be connected to the end of the data cable. The new slave drive should be connected to the next in line connector.
Once all data cables & power cables are connected plug in the PC's power cord & boot the system, again pressing the delete key every two seconds until the boot main menu loads. Now you should see the Primary IDE Master drive & you're new Primary IDE Slave drive listed. You should also see the DVD as the Secondary IDE Master. Go to the title "Boot" again. Set the boot order as mentioned above. Save & exit the bios. Windows should load as it did before. Once windows has finished loading open windows Explorer & see if you're new slave drive is listed.
Shut down the system & unplug the power cord. Unplug the slave drive & mount it into its drive bay. Take a black marker & mark the side of the drive as slave. Disconnect the Master drive & connect it into its drive bay. Reconnect the data cables & power cables. Check all connectors before closing the case up. Re-connect the PC's power cord & boot the system. Everything should be fine. If you have a problem getting the data cable connected to the slave drive because its closer to the DVD drive as opposed to the Primary IDE Master drive you can make the slave drive a Secondary IDE Master (Change its jumper setting according to the drive’s label for Master with a slave) & connect the DVD player as a Secondary IDE Slave. (Change its jumper to slave). Change the Primary IDE Master drive’s jumper as a Master with no slave, single drive. That all.

Good luck emceedrive!
Take your time. Any troubles please post here.
You should be fine though.
Mike

Aug 11, 2008 | ASUS P4P800 SE (890552603657) Motherboard

Tip

Why Can't you Fit all the Space Available after Formatting RW and Solid State...


You Cannot Put 700MB of Data on a 700MB RW Disc: Why?
(This also pertains to DVDs and Solid State Flash Media)



[The point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]

Lets start with RW media where this causes the most confusion:
You will never be able to format the entire 700MB of any RW media. The same is true for DVD RW media. This is because the formatting requires a file allocation table (FAT) be created, the formatted disc will be segmented into cylinders (circular sections of the disc) referred to as tracks and that is further divided into Sectors. The FAT contains columns and rows that containing information on exactly where data is stored by referencing track and sector within the FAT. The file may span many sectors and be across several tracks. The data and the table takes up a lot of room. A good and easy example of this is a floppy disk. If you have a floppy disk you will notice on the diskette drawer slide it states it is a 2MB diskette, however, when formatted you only have roughly 1.44MB of usable addressable space. The same is true for any formatted RW CD or DVD.

Can this be Different between Media Maker Companies?
Simply stated: No.
Just how much space is available after formatting a RW disc on your system sometimes depends in part on the software used to format the disc. But this will never be different enough between media makers to amount to much. The exception is preformatted discs you may purchase off the shelf. Those preformatted disc may vary from maker to maker.

How about Software driven Burner Programs?
In CD RWs, for example only, the common assumption is that 545MB will be available for data storage. Every software program may be slightly different; each software burner producer reserves the same, more or less space than another. This difference will be slight, if noticeable at all.

How about CD/DVD-Rs then?
Additionally, but aside from RW media. You cannot place 700MB of data on a 700MB CD-R. Room is included on the media for file sector information and label data for Start of File and End of File markers. Each piece of data that comprises a file on the disc, RW or R, has information that is part of a label such as (although greatly simplified) part 2 of 200. I'm not overly simplifying this by example but it is close enough for an average layman to get a grasp of how this works. Each part of a file broken down by sector size (more on this in the next paragraph) on your disc has a marker to indicate which part of the whole it comprises. Your computer uses this data to reconstruct the file when you open it or copy and paste the file. When moving or sending files these parts of a file are referred to as packets.

Space Loss From Sector Size
Another reason for 'space lossage' on RW media is that when formatted, each sector may be 8K, 16K or 32K in size. However, the last sector in a string of sectors for a file rarely fills in the full 8 / 16K or 32K of space. Lets say, for example, that the last sector only has 4K of data and this is an actual average for your RW disc. You end up loosing 4,12 or 28K of space for each and every file on the disc. So in reality you have the 545MB of available space plus the loss of data in the last sector of a series of file segments. When there are a lot of file written to a RW disc, the lossage adds up real fast. Does this also apply to CD-R media? Yes, and can have a dramatic affect. On a 700MB CD-R you will never be able to put 700MB of data on the disc for this reason.

The Same is Also True for Hard Drives on your System
Another good example of this loss of storage size as advertised is with a Computer Hard Drive. A 500GB Hard Drive will not even come anywhere close to the advertised usable space once it is formatted, but when you see your drive in the System, it will be labeled and described as a 500GB drive.

How about Music CD and DVD MP3s?
Music CDs are quite a bit different but and not the same for DVD MP3 discs which are data discs.
When you purchase a CD Disc labeled as a Music CD, it is preformatted for music only. And I'll describe this method shortly. And as a result will not store data.

Music tracks on a Music CD are laid down much like a vinyl album, in one continuous groove that swirls across the entire disc media. At the beginning and end of each track on a Music CD is data, called Meta Data that contains information about the track title and artist/album. As just described for each track holding data pertaining to track title and artist/album, you cannot fit exactly 700MB of music you listen to later. Additionally, the industry standard is to included two seconds of silence between tracks titles, but still on the same continuous groove that comprises the entire Music CD.

Is this True for Solid State Removable Disks like Compact Flash?
Yes, and for the same reason already stated above pertaining to CD/DVD-RWs. When the Flash Media is formatted it also contains a FAT and the media is formatted with Tracks and Sectors. Files written have to have package labels and are formatted into there sectors and where the last sector is occupied with data that is usually less than the sector size and thus it will never be filled up to its maximum capacity.



[As stated earlier, the point of this Tip is to help you understand in the broadest of terms why you cannot use up all the space on your CD or DVD RW media and your CD-Rs and DVD-Rs as well as Flash Media.]


Authors note: As needed, for corrections or additions to this topic I will add notes to this Tip below as comments.
If you need or wish to contact me you can reach me from the Ask button found here or at http://www.fixya.com/users/worldvet/

on Oct 18, 2008 | Verbatim Pocket (94345) CD-RW Storage...

1 Answer

Acer Dual Hard Drive Question


welcome to fixya

the data part of the drive is just a back up and it is not a 2nd drive the hd have been split in to 2 areas on one drive and moving your stuff there is not a very good idea
you can if you like to copy file and paste it into the data area


i hope this helps yo out have a good day:)

Jul 18, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have an Acer Aspire with two hard drives, can I move all of my music?


Its not two hardrives, its duo processor, and two cache chips

check the size of data and acer drives (right click and properties, check size)
If they are large should be able to store copy of music

go into the limewire download folder, should be in my computer -> c: -> program files -> Limewire -> shared folder - copy files (edit select all, edit copy or ctrl + left clikc to individually select)
then paste to new directory or folder (right click empty sapce of folder & left click paste

same for Itunes - locate where files are saving to then just copy paste from one location to another

should effect the programs from working, unless You delete files

Jul 16, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My Western Digital 320GB MyBook... Problem


If all you want to do is transfer data that you have backed up on your main computer then all you need to do is plug the drive into another computer, click on 'my computer' and click on the mybook drive to explore the data on it. To transfer a certain file just copy it and paste it onto the drive of the new computer.

If you are talking about backing up data from a second PC, you will need to install the WD software on that particular PC, and use the advanced backup menu. Just remember that if you back up a second computer, you need to create a folder for that data to be stored in, otherwise it is possible that it would overwrite the data from your first PC

in otherwords to back up several PCs the root of the WD drive should have folders in it labeled - 'PC 1', 'PC 2', etc

Hope this helps

Regards
DarkmnaUK

Please Remember to rate.


May 18, 2008 | Western Digital 320GB MyBook External USB...

1 Answer

Getting labeller to see cd data content nero6


hi,
you need to have a lightscribe drive for this.

regards.
bzoy

Jan 03, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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