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Valli@ubuntu:~/Desktop/zebra-0.95a$ make install Making install in lib make[1]: Entering directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/lib' make[2]: Entering directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/lib' make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-exec-am'. make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-data-am'. make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/lib' make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/lib' Making install in zebra make[1]: Entering directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/zebra' source='rtadv.c' object='rtadv.o' libtool=no \ depfile='.deps/rtadv.Po' tmpdepfile='.deps/rtadv.TPo' \ depmode=gcc3 /bin/bash ../depcomp \ gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -DSYSCONFDIR=\"/usr/local/etc/\" -DMULTIPATH_NUM=1 -I. -I. -I.. -I.. -I.. -I../lib -g -O2 -Wall -c `test -f 'rtadv.c' || echo './'`rtadv.c rtadv.c: In function ‘rtadv_recv_packet’: rtadv.c:123: error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type rtadv.c:124: error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type rtadv.c:124: error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type rtadv.c: In function ‘rtadv_send_packet’: rtadv.c:149: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘struct in6_pktinfo’ rtadv.c:194: warning: operation on ‘node’ may be undefined rtadv.c:268: error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type rtadv.c:269: error: dereferencing pointer to incomplete type rtadv.c: In function ‘rtadv_prefix_lookup’: rtadv.c:476: warning: operation on ‘node’ may be undefined rtadv.c: In function ‘rtadv_config_write’: rtadv.c:977: warning: operation on ‘node’ may be undefined rtadv.c:982: warning: pointer targets in passing argument 3 of ‘inet_ntop’ differ in signedness make[1]: *** [rtadv.o] Error 1 make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/valli/Desktop/zebra-0.95a/zebra' make: *** [install-recursive] Error 1 When i enter the command make install after[./configure,make] it shows this error how can i fix this.

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  • Anonymous Mar 29, 2009

    Install-recursive

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SOURCE: when i gave the command

Any solution to this problem?

Best regards,
David.

Posted on Sep 30, 2011

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Can I override the bios at startup so that it will recognize a new hard drive - for linux?


There should be no need to play around with your bios settings. Linux will install on a brand new hard drive as the sole operating system, or on an existing hard drive alongside Windows without any problem.

If you haven't already got a Linux distro, have a look at
http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Download whichever version of Ubuntu you prefer (LTS- the long term support version is recommended).

When the .iso file containing the operating system had downloaded, burn it onto a dvd, or install it on a usb drive.

Insert the dvd into the drive and restart or switch off/switch on the computer. The dvd will then kick in and offer you the choice of trying Ubuntu without installing, or a full install.

If you're using a new, empty hard drive just follow the on screen instructions and Ubuntu will install as the sole operating system.

If you already have Windows on your hard drive Ubuntu will give you the choice of either erasing Windows or installing Ubuntu alongside Windows. It's your choice.

Installing Ubuntu alongside Windows creates a dual boot hard drive. At start up you just choose which OS to use - Windows or Ubuntu. If creating this dual-boot system Ubuntu puts a (Linux) boot loader into the Windows OS so that Linux is recognised.

If you save the Ubuntu file to a usb drive you then have to change the bios settings so that your computer uses USB as the first boot device. Then restart your computer so that it boots in from your usb .. and Ubuntu will begin installing.

Whichever you use - dvd or usb - during the installation process Ubuntu will ask you how many GB of hard drive space it should use? You do not need to physically partition the hard drive. Linux will do it for you.

If it's a desktop PC you are using with Windows on the first hard drive and are fitting a second hard drive to install Linux on, or have installed Linux on the second hard drive .. and find that Linux doesn't appear at start up, it's because there's no Linux boot loader in Windows.

I quit using Windows many years ago.

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Installing Ubuntu Server on Dell Dimension 2400?


Step 1:
The Ubuntu Linux operating system is available either with or without a desktop environment. The version with the desktop environment is meant for personal use and includes word processing, email and graphic editing software. The version without the desktop environment is called "Ubuntu Server." The server version does not come with any graphical software or productivity software. There are three different desktop environments available for the Ubuntu operating system. The default is the Gnome desktop. The other two are the KDE and the XFCE desktop environments.

Log into the server. Type the command "sudo apt-get update" to update the list of software packages available. Type the command "sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop" to install the Gnome desktop. Type the command "sudo apt-get install xubuntu-desktop" to install the XFCE desktop. Type the command "sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop" to install the KDE desktop. Type the command "sudo reboot" to reboot the server. Ubuntu Linux Tutorials,Howtos,Tips & News http://www.ubuntugeek.com/install-gui-in-ubuntu-server.html

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Acer Aspire AM3470G-UW10P desktop- I purchased 4 of these and cannot install windows 7 on them


If your computer is 6 yrs or older it might not support windows 7 also you will need a minimum of 1 GB of RAM for 32 bit or 2GB of RAM for 64 bit to install windows 7 http://windows.microsoft.com/en-AU/windows7/products/system-requirements

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My pc is locked in hibernation mode, I think. Powers up, but mouse and keyboard won't respond. What should I be doind? Frustrated.


The best solution I have found for this problem is to remove the hard drive and attach it as either an external drive or internal secondary drive on another PC.
Once your PC has booted up click on the drive in my computer, making sure that it is the secondary drive and not the primary which is usually called drive C.
Make sure your files and folders setting is unchecked in the area called hide extensions for known file types, and hide protected operating system files. This is found by clicking the tools tab on my computer, then folders, then view.
Now find the file called hiberfil.sys in the root directory of the hard drive from your malfunctioning computer and delete it. Turn off the PC, remove the drive and reinstall it in the original PC. You should now be able to start windows properly.
If this method is too difficult or impossible for you to do you can also obtain a copy of Ubuntu and run your PC from the Live CD version. Then you can simply find the drive in the drives directory on Ubuntu and remove hiberfil.sys that way. Restart the PC, after removing the CD and all should be fine.

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Unlock CURRENT password on acer 250 netbook on ubuntu


Try these steps it worked for me it can work for you:

1. You’ll need to boot from your Ubuntu Live CD, choosing “Try Ubuntu without any change to your computer” from the boot menu.
2. Once the system boots, open up a new Terminal window from Applications \ Accessories and then type in the following command:

sudo fdisk -l (minus small leter L)

3. Now you’ll need to create a directory to mount the hard drive on. Since we’re actually booting off the live cd, the directory doesn’t really get created anywhere. then type

sudo mkdir /media/sda1

4.The next command will mount the hard drive in the /media/sda1 folder.

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/sda1

5. The command that actually does the trick is: chroot.
it is used to open up a shell with a different root directory than the current shell is using, and we’ll pass in the folder where we mounted the hard drive.

sudo chroot /media/sda1

6. Now you can be able to use the passwd command to change your user account’s password, and it will be applied to the hard drive since we are using chroot.

7. passwd 12345

Note: you’ll need to type your username after the passwd command in order to change the right password.

8. Now you should be able to reboot your system and log yourself in with your new password.

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2 Answers

How to unblock your computer?


Understandable that you cannot get on My Space, and you are bored.

Your school, as have many others, have blocked your access to My Space, because they believe there are problems with the website.
Viruses could easily wind up in your computer, and affect the school computers, plus a host of other issues.

At least this is my theory of what they believe.

Install Ubuntu? NOT a good idea!
Why?

1.Because you if you override the settings on your laptop, the school will know it, for one. Could take the laptop away?

2.Can you access the administrator account? Nope.
You can't install programs, delete programs, or access any administrator functions.

3.Ubuntu Linux is a WHOLE NEW ballgame. It isn't anything like Windows, and isn't supposed to be. It's like comparing Apples to Oranges. Both are good, (IMHO), but they are different.
[I use Ubuntu Linux 8.10 - Intrepid Ibex]

Know someone that Does have a computer you can access My Space?

Oct 12, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have just installed my first dual boot XP and Ubuntu on my old desktop. The floppy drive is recognised on XP but not on Ubuntu - What do I need to do to use it under Ubuntu 8 ?


Here are the steps to follow:

1. Click on "Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal".
2. In the terminal type "gksudo gedit" and enter the system password (you created this when installed Ubuntu). This will enable you to temporarily edit the "modules" file which is usually a read-only system file.
3. Click "Places -> Computer".
4. Click on "Filesystem".
5. Open up the directory (folder) called "Modules". It is the grey icon nearer the bottom of the list (you have to move the navigation bar down).
6. The file "Modules" should open in the "gedit" program.
7. It should look something like this:

# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.

fuse
lp

8. Now add the word "floppy" to the bottom of the file. It will now look like this:

# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.

fuse
lp
floppy

9. Now save the file by pressing pressing the "save" icon.
10. Exit the "gedit" program.
11. Now restart ubunutu (reboot the computer).
12. After reboot is complete, the floppy icon should be found under "Places" on the panel. Click on it to open a floppy. Remember to "unmount volume" when you remove or change the floppy. Linux will not let you change floppies like windows by just popping it out.

Hope this helps!

Oct 08, 2009 | PC Desktops

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