Question about Nikon 7314 Binocular Microscope

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Nikon Optiphot stage is falling

I cannot get the stage up high enough to focus under 10X. I think the coarse tension needs to be adjusted but I'm unsure how to do this.

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This might be sign of trouble, because the Nylon gears inside might be worn out. I did not noticed a tension ring on Optiphot 1 or 2. The Nikon S and Metaphot from 1960s to 1976 have Nylon gears with tension ring adjustments.

Posted on Feb 03, 2009

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Why does the mechanical stage for my microscope keep falling to the bottom-most position?


Maybe there is some wear at the thread where the stage fits, causing that the stage cannot hold.

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After focusing it drifts out of focus. The knobs do not stay in the same place


There is a tension adjustment just inside the coarse focus knob. (same side as the switch) It looks like a chrome ring with 2 or 3 holes in it. You may have an odd looking tool that came with your microscope that is used to make this adjustment. Tighten it just a bit until the stage stops falling. You don't want it too tight or it will begin to make it difficult to adjust your coarse focus.

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The stage slides down on its own and the view gets out of focus.


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 22, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

The focus knobs drift


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 13, 2010 | National Optical 138-MS Monocular...

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Why should the coarse focusing knob not be used when focusing with the higher-powered objective lenses


There are two reasons. One reason is that when on high power you are working so close to the glass slide that it is easy to misjudge how much you are moving the specimen toward the lens that you can break a slide before you realize it. The coarse focus moves the stage with the specimen on it very fast and you only have a very very short distance within the focus plane before you run the objective lens into the slide.
Secondly, it is just harder to control the minute adjustments needed at the higher powers with the "coarse" focus knob. If you start at the low magnifications find what you want to concentrate on with the coarse focus knobs and then work your way up to the higher powers, you will have very little trouble moving to the fine focus controls at 40x and 100x while still having control of your image.

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1 Answer

Stage slides down after focusing


There is a tension adjustment for this. It is located on the coarse focus knob which is on the same side as the switch. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. A strange looking tool should have come with the scope. It is designed to fit into these holes and allow you to adjust the tension on the coarse focus knob. You need to tighten it just a little bit. Not too much or you will have trouble operating the coarse focus knobs smoothly.

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1 Answer

Swift microscope no 634008 having problem staying in focus when switching magnification


First, a scope of this grade will not be completely in focus as you move from one magnification to the next. But it should be close enough that you do not loose your point of interest.
Be sure you are not pressing down on the stage specimen platform as you change magnifications. It is very sensitive to pressure. Also, be sure that the coarse focus tension is tight enough that the platform is not drifting down imperceptibly as switch magnifications. Look through the scope and watch if the image goes out of focus while you are watching it. If so, you have what is called "stage drift". This is corrected by tightening the tension on the coarse focus knob.
The tension adjustment is on the coase focus shaft. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. There should have been a strange looking tool that came with your scope. It is used to adjust the tension. If your specimen is "drifting" out of focus, simply tighten the tension ring a little bit at a time until the specimen no longer goes out of focus. Do not get it so tight that it is not easy to operate the coarse focus knob.

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2 Answers

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The problem is that the stage is heavy and the adjustment screws are loose. You need to tighten the coarse adjustment knob screws in order to create more friction so that the stage stays put. That, or don't adjust anything and keep holding on to the coarse adjustment while you're using it.

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I have a fisher stereo microscope on boom stand. When I rack up or down the body keeps falling as it is unable to keep its tension. What can I do?


You need to tighten the coarse adjustment screws to provide more tension so it sticks. Leave the fine adjustment as it is, it works on a different system. It's the coarse adjustment crank that is slipping due to the weight of the stage and lack of pressure from the screws.

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1 Answer

Stage slowly falls causing unfocus


Try holding the Right knob so it does not move, whilst firmly moving the Left knob towards you (clockwise), this is the adjusting method used on Zeiss Jena 1960's High End microscopes, e.g Eduaval & Ergaval.
Good luck,
Alan Mowle

Mar 05, 2009 | Microscopes

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