Question about Bushnell Voyager 78-9565 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

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Telescope is only good for viewing moon...help!!!

I bought my Bushnell AN 78-9565 refractor a while ago, and it states that I am supposed to be able to view the stars, nebulae and planets with a great amount of satisfaction. The only problem is, I can only view the moon with pleasing results... I can't view the stars, other planets or nebulae. I feel cheated and have have tried everything possible to be able to obtain the same viewing results as many others who have purchased the same model
Can you help me? Is there a telescope book for dummies? I sure feel like one!

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  • Lady3
    Lady3 Dec 10, 2008

    Thank you very much for replying! The advice was just what I needed, plus I'm definately going to practice focusing my telescope on towers and buildings during day light hours, using the instructions you gave me!

    Thank you so much ^_^

    Lady3


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  • 67 Answers

Your scope is 565mm focal length with a 60mm objective which makes it f:9.5. (telescope focal length divided by lens diameter)
all this means that the optics are capable of viewing larger planets. nebula is a bit of a stretch. maybe under exceptionally dark skies with at least 30min. of dark adaptation. brighter objects like m42 or m31 should be visible, bear in mind that only very large telescopes will resolve the slightest hint of color in nebulosity. the rest of us are reserved to gray scale. i would suggest using a 26mm eyepiece plossl if available. next make sure your finding system is aligned to the scope. this is best done during the day at a distant object like a radio tower. center the object in the eyepiece then align the finder.
next get your self a good sky map like stellarium software a freebie and a fav. to ensure your looking at what you think your looking at.

a word on eyepiece selection. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the scope by the focal length of the eyepiece. for instance the scope is 565mm the recommended eyepiece is 26mm so the magnification would be around 22x.
a rule of thumb for optics is about 50x per inch of objective. which means your scope is good for about 100x. so by the math you would use a 5.6mm e.p. to achieve 100x, however as optical powers increase field of view decreases making it difficult to find objects. find your object with a wide field e.p. then switch to a higher power to zoom in. if the image gets fuzzy at high power attempt to refocus, if it doesn't clean up either your asking a bit to much from the scope or seeing conditions in the upper atmosphere may not be ideal. what ever you do don't give up there are some amazing things to see out there.

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

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Your first night time target should be the moon.

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There are many factors that can reduce your ability to see planetary detail. I had my Celestron 200mm out the other night looking at Saturn but saw no details because the atmosphere was too unstable. There are also limits to what a telescope can realistically view.

There is a general rule of thumb that states you can expect to view 50x per inch of aperture. Your telescope has roughly 5" of aperture. 5 times 50 equals a maximum of 250x. However, this is a guideline. On bad nights like I had you'll never reach that 250x since objects will appear blurry or unstable. On good nights, you can exceed this.

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1 Answer

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