Question about Canon Digital Rebel XT / EOS 350D Body only Digital Camera

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Blurry photos of indoor sports

I'm in Program mode, ISO speed at 1600 - most shots are blurry; auto flash set to "on" . (Some gyms are bright enough I don't need a flash, but others are dark so I bought a flash attachment)

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  • Anonymous Dec 22, 2008

    Takes great sports shots outdoors but when i take it inside with the same setting it takes blurry pictures with a tail behind the person

  • rpoir Jan 11, 2009

    I have the same problem - spring baseball photos are awesome. Fall baseball (it gets dark earlier), baseball under the lights, or indoor soccer photos are blurry!

  • sucipto_harj May 11, 2010

    hi just wodering, what is aperture and speed that you setup? lense that you use? any IS feature on the lense? since its not only about ISO

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6 Suggested Answers

markevans
  • 148 Answers

SOURCE: CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark

learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck
mark

Posted on Dec 24, 2007

  • 155 Answers

SOURCE: Blurry photos that are really frustrating!

Evening & Indoors? The kit lens is really going to struggle here. Your only immediate solution is to use ISO 1600 which makes the shutter faster but adds a little noise to the pictures.

You really want to get a better lens for indoor work. If you need cheap, try the 50mm f1.8, it's a prime not a zoom, so you will need to use your feet to "zoom" but it's incredibly good for indoor / low light work.

I upgraded to a 17-55mm f2.8 IS, it was rather expensive but I have never had a blurry indoor shot since - I do also use an external Speedlite flash with it though, which also helps tremendously.

It's an expensive hobby!!

Posted on Feb 26, 2009

Gurudristi
  • 98 Answers

SOURCE: Underexposed image on Auto mode

You can change the ISO setting also to Auto. If you have the advanced guide (see pp 80, 107).
Press the ISO button it will switch from various ISO setting to AUTO.

Do remember in Bright light , a lower ISO number like 80 will give you very fine images, while as the light level goes down, the ISO number will change to a higher number and the image will become more grainer.
I hope I could answer to your query.
Please do rate. Thanks

Posted on Feb 27, 2009

  • 157 Answers

SOURCE: Z740 cannot focus on long-distance indoor shots

Have you tried changing the mode? ie portrait, closeup, macro etc?

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

pixeldawg
  • 71 Answers

SOURCE: when on sports setting, my camera shoots slow and

More than likely, your exposure- specifically your shutter speed settings- are too low. When you have fast action, you must have a higher shutter speed (Higher, meaning that the DURATION of the exposure is less. So, an exposure of 1/250th of a second is more desirable than an exposure of 1/30th of a second when shooting indoor sports. (This difference equates to about 400% more exposure, duration-wise). When shooting sports indoors, a "Fast" lens, meaning that the front of the lens is bigger, which allows more light into the camera at one time. (This normally equates to "F-Stop" settings. So, a 50mm F1.4 lens will be a "faster" lens than a 50mm F2 lens. The lower the F number, the "faster" the lens. This also equates to higher prices...) Another consideration for shooting stop-action sports photography indoors is using higher ISO settings. When you double the ISO number, you cut the amount of light required to make a good exposure in half. So, ISO 200 requires half the light of ISO100, and 400 requires half the light of 200 and so on. Typically, I use a setting of ISO 800 or higher for indoor sports (Which, BTW is my speciality...). The trade-off for using higher ISO settings is that it introduces more noise into the image, which many people find less desirable. I also wrote a few articles for POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING about shooting sports. The "football" article will more than likely be the most help to you. Basically, ALL sports photography is shot the same way, and if you use these techniques, your work will greatly improve. Here is a link to those, and hope they help!

http://www.popphoto.com/Blogs/Sports-Photography

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/Shooting-Talladega-Superspeedway

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/How-to-Photograph-Football

Posted on Jul 10, 2009

Steve5
  • 423 Answers

SOURCE: I have the Nikon D60 - Ive taken sport/action pictures

The main difference between the two shooting conditions is the amount of light you have to work with. For the indoor action shots, set the ISO setting to the highest available through the menu (1600 ISO) to maximize the ability of the camera to work with the diminished light. The other (but more expensive) way to achieve better indoor shots is with the use of a "faster" lens, ie one with a lower maximum f stop number (f2.8 is faster than f3.5, for instance). Also ensure you are shooting with your lens at its widest f stop setting (lowest number).

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

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I have the Nikon D60 - Ive taken sport/action pictures


The main difference between the two shooting conditions is the amount of light you have to work with. For the indoor action shots, set the ISO setting to the highest available through the menu (1600 ISO) to maximize the ability of the camera to work with the diminished light. The other (but more expensive) way to achieve better indoor shots is with the use of a "faster" lens, ie one with a lower maximum f stop number (f2.8 is faster than f3.5, for instance). Also ensure you are shooting with your lens at its widest f stop setting (lowest number).

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Blurry indoor results- using flash


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Even high grade professional flashes only work out to 20-30 feet so they won't help you. Read your cameras manual on taking pictures in low light conditions. It will give you all of the above in great detail. You have a great camera but you need to learn how it works, don't give up on it.

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3 Answers

Blurry photos that are really frustrating!


Evening & Indoors? The kit lens is really going to struggle here. Your only immediate solution is to use ISO 1600 which makes the shutter faster but adds a little noise to the pictures.

You really want to get a better lens for indoor work. If you need cheap, try the 50mm f1.8, it's a prime not a zoom, so you will need to use your feet to "zoom" but it's incredibly good for indoor / low light work.

I upgraded to a 17-55mm f2.8 IS, it was rather expensive but I have never had a blurry indoor shot since - I do also use an external Speedlite flash with it though, which also helps tremendously.

It's an expensive hobby!!

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Adjusting light??


Did you check your settings? You may be outside of the range (red figures for speed and or f stop) in your selected mode, for example if you selected 1600 ISO for indoor shots and forgot to set it back to a lower ISO value.

Alternatively you can use AUTO mode, it's the most foolproof. 

If you selected 1600 ISO don't forget, when you change the ISO to a lowe value, also put the camera back in high resolution, it stays in 1MP mode by default.

HTH...

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Having problems with the flash\ blurred and grainy images


You should not use the flash for these shots (unless you connect a powerful external flash), it won't help you at this distance. You should use the shutter priority mode and experiment with shutter speed (no flash) to get the best result - for sports action it should probably be faster than 1/100 sec. If the light is too low you may use higher ISO setting - 200 or 400 (though higher ISO will result in grainier images, it may be your only option for blur-free photos).

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