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The bottom (bake) element of my oven will not shut off

I have a Moffat Gourmet 300, model # MSS 4053 H. Recently the bottom element burned out rather dramatically, going off like a welding rod. I replaced it, but it did not work. I then found a fuse was burned out and replaced it too. Then the element came on on its own and would not shut off, with the oven reaching the temperature that it would go to to clean the oven. Suspecting a relay had shorted out when the element burned out, I replaced it too. It then appeared to work properly on its first test run, with the new element cycling on and off as it usually would. The next day when the oven was used the element didn't shut off when it reached temp, even though the oven controller was no longer indicating that it was heating. I took out the fuse to stop the element from continuing to heat. What other component could be at fault? This is an old stove, so parts are hard to find. Where is the best place to look for parts for it?

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3 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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hbsurfdawg
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SOURCE: heating element will not heat

With all that you said, I would suspect an open or faulty element. It is pretty much the most obvious solution.

If you have any electronically ability and you are going to open the oven, use an ohm or resistance meter, check the amount of ohms and use the upper element as a reference for the correct reading.
The element will either read open or good. You can use a light tester also and if the light lights between the two connectors of the elements, then it is ok and look elsewhere.

E

Posted on Mar 02, 2009

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  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: model FEFL78CBC frigidaire oven bottom (bake)

We had the same thing happen and now they came and said it was the clock that needs to be replaced. They said that controls the oven. Even though clock is on and working the function for turning on the oven is not

Posted on Mar 16, 2010

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My defy gemini gourmet oven is too hot! when i bake, my cake his burnt pitch black on top and is raw on the inside... please help


I don't know about that particular over but when that is your result, it is usually because the oven is on Broil (Top burner is on, used for steaks, ribs, things like that) instead of bake (Bottom burner is on with a more distributed heat for baking since the rack isn't too close to the heating element)
Recheck your settings :)

Jan 10, 2018 | Ovens

1 Answer

Broiler will not come on when baking


Take a look at the element ( the "tube" inside the oven that glows red hot when the oven is turned on). If the element is burned out it will not be hot and glowing. You may have a loose connection to the element but most likely it is burned out and needs replacing.
Our stove is 27 years old and I have had to replace top or bottom elements every 6 years or so. I just bought a replacement element at Canadian Tire in Calgary for about $34. Just undo the 2 screws around the element and attach the new element to the old wires.
Good Luck -I hope this works for you

Jan 10, 2013 | Moffat Ovens

1 Answer

Built in oven won't get hot


hello there
Usually, when an oven won't heat up or bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it. Now if the oven It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:" When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem
Hope thisis very helpful for you
Best regards Michael .

Mar 08, 2010 | Ovens

1 Answer

The broiler works but the bake side wont heat up but does warm


Hi There
I have found some stuff for you to read and hope this will help. Let me know how it goes.
It won't bake Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it. It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:" When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
Best Regards Richard

Dec 30, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

I need a manual for omega oven,model not known.


Hello. If your stove is manufactured by Omega Appliances, it appears that they no longer produce it. That said I can speak to your heating element issue. When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out. You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results. If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component. When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly. If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details. Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.
If you would like to contact the Omega Appliance company directly, you can reach them as follows: http://omegaappliances.com/contactus.php

Nov 20, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

Oven will not heat.


Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it.

It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:"

  • When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

    You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

    If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

  • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, it could be one of several different things. First check to see if the thermostat sensing bulb has come loose from its holder. It could be lying on the floor of the oven or resting on the heating element. This would cause the oven to not heat correctly.

    If the thermostat bulb is not dislodged, it's likely that the thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective.

    Electronic ovens with a digital display use a sensor to monitor oven temperature. To solve temperature problems for these models, you may need to replace the sensor. On some digital-display models, you can calibrate the temperature using the key pad. See your operator's manual for details.

    Ovens without a digital display often use a mechanical system for controlling temperature. On many of these units, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat.

    If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.

Jun 01, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

1 Answer

Wont heat past 200 degres


When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

May 27, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

Kenmore oven lower element sporadically heating.


When the food you're baking is done on top but not on the bottom--or when baking just takes far too long to finish--the bake element may be burned out.

You may get fooled into thinking it's working, because the oven is hot inside. But many electric ovens use the broil element, too, during the preheat and bake cycles. So the food may be getting heated only by the broil element, which causes poor baking results.

If the bake element is burned out, replacing it should solve the problem. Otherwise, you need to further troubleshoot the oven's electrical system to locate the defective wire or component.

May 27, 2009 | Ovens

1 Answer

Whirlpool oven issue


Usually, when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake element is burned out. The bake element is the black, pencil- thick tube at the bottom of the oven. When the oven heats, the element glows red. This element has an expected life-span of several years. It may last for only one; it may last for many more. When the element burns out, you need to replace it.

Oct 26, 2007 | Whirlpool RBS305PDS Electric Single Oven

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