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I get Scam. I think this is a Scam so I should inform this Office that your Product Name is used to scam. But if this is true, I'm so sorry. Please tell me then if this is legitimate from the HP Company or this is another scam from the fraud people of Nigeria. Here's the email address from where the scam is: mr_mohammed.jamal@hotmail.co.uk Here's what the email inform me: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hewlett Packard Company, Wrights Lane Kensington, W85SP London, United Kingdom. Dear Sir/Madam, We congratulate you over your success in the following official publication results for the year 2008 of the e-mail electronic online draw held by Hewlett Packard here in United Kingdom. In promotion to our Hardware & Software Products {H.S.P} your email address emerged as one of the online winning emails in the 1st category and therefore attracted the followings: A Cheque of 500.000 GBP {Five Hundred Thousand Pounds} HP Pavilion 2700 Laptop HP Deskjet F4185 printer with scanner {All-in-One} Therefore we write to officially notify you of this award and also directing you to contact ''Foreign Promo Agent Company'' through email for your winnings award confirmation & verification. And in other to facilitate your claiming process you are require to send in the following personal information for your paper work , which includes the issueing of your price cheque and other winning award documents . ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- I need your assistance if this is legitimate or not. Thank you.

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  • jamescampasa Nov 20, 2008

    Excellent good people of HP Company! Thank you of this guidance. You save my identity and money. God will bless the whole team.

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It is a Scam. they want your money. Anybody that tells you you won something for nothing is a scam. They are rip offs. They will tell you that you won the lottery in some other country. It is all baloney.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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5 Answers

My computer suddenly came up with a screen purportedly from Microsoft saying that my computer had been infected with a s critical virus (something like that).


You were scammed. You need to contact ACTUAL Microsoft, immediately, and find out if there is anything you can do. Microsoft would never charge you to fix something wrong with their operating systems.



Only ever trust Microsoft.com, Windows Defender, and Microsoft Security Essentials. Anything else is a scam or an ancient anti-virus software that offers more trouble than assistance.



I feel very sorry for your current condition, and you may need to also contact your bank to rectify the purchase, as you just paid money to illegal operations.

Jun 01, 2016 | Microsoft PC Desktops

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Scams and Phishing on Yahoo! Mail.


If you receive an email asking you to update your banking details or that you've won a huge sum of money from Yahoo! then these are scams. Firstly a bank will <b>NEVER</b> ask you to update your account details through an email, don't under any circumstances click on any links within a mail like this. Secondly, when you receive a mail stating that <b>YOU</b> have won a huge sum of money from some lottery in some foreign country or from Yahoo! this too is fake. The Yahoo! Corporation in Holland Lottery scam is one of them. Again don't by any means reply to it or send them any of your personal information. Contact Yahoo! <a href="http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/helpcentral/helpcentral_contactus.html">here</a> and click on <b>Mail</b> under <b>M</b> in the list, this will take you to a page to login. Login, then click on the heading <b>Got Spam? Report it here</b> as shown in the following picture:<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_26.JPG" /><br />This will take you to a page where you need to tell Yahoo! everything about the scam, including the Full Headers and Contents of the mail. I will explain how to get the full headers of an e-mail now.<br /><br /><b><u>How to copy the full Headers in Yahoo Mail!</u></b><br />1) With the e-mail open, click <b>Actions</b> to the top right.<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_27.jpg" /><br />2) This will display a drop down menu shown here:<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_28.jpg" /><br />3) Click on <b>Full Header</b> to display the following window:<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_29.jpg" /><br />4) Copy the entire text (all the words in this window) to the headers box:<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_30.JPG" /><br />5) Then copy the contents of the mail to the next box:<br /><br /><img src="slasher_x_31.JPG" /><br />6) And then click submit.<br /><br />Easy as that! This will enable Yahoo! to filter such scam e-mails in the main server and prohibit them from entering anyone's account in the future, and it's all thanks to you!! Good Job! Feel great, you have just saved a huge amount of people from falling for these ingenious scams.

on Nov 15, 2010 | PC Desktops

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Phishing "Protect urself" Know What Hackers Do !This is a featured page



Phishing continues to be one of the most significant security threats facing Internet users. During 2007, scammers distributed millions of phishing scam emails that targeted many different entities. Phishing attacks are sure to continue in 2008 and scammers will use such attacks to steal money and identities from many new victims around the world. Armed with a little knowledge about how phishing scams work, however, you can ensure that you do not become one of these victims. phishing-scammer.jpg
Phishing scammers continue to find new victims all around the world

A phishing scam is one in which victims are tricked into providing personal information such as account numbers, passwords and credit card details to what they believe to be a legitimate company or organization. In order to carry out this trick, the scammers often create a "look-a-like" webpage that is designed to resemble the target company's official website. Typically, emails are used as "bait" in order to get the potential victim to visit the bogus website. The emails use various devious ruses to trick readers into clicking on the included links, thereby opening the bogus website. Information submitted on these bogus websites is harvested by the scammers and may then be used to steal funds from the user's accounts and/or steal the victim's identity.

Phishing scam emails are created to give the illusion that they have been sent by a legitimate institution. Emails may arrive in HTML format and include logos, styling, contact and copyright information virtually identical to those used by the targeted institution. To further create the illusion of legitimacy, some of the secondary links in these bogus emails may lead to the institution's genuine website. However, one or more of the hyperlinks featured in the body of the email will point to the fraudulent website.

Links in phishing scam messages are often disguised to make it appear that they lead to the genuine institution site. The sender address of the email may also be disguised in such a way that it appears to have originated from the targeted company. Because they are sent in bulk to many recipients, scam emails use generic greetings such as "Dear account holder" or "Dear [targeted institution] customer". If an institution needed to contact a customer about some aspect of his or her account, the contact email would address the customer by name.

To be Continued

on Jul 16, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Www.paypal.com/ew/f=default


contact to your bank CSR

Sep 02, 2014 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How to open sign on screen


In this case, please contact your bank by phone or visit an bank office for help and do not take advice online from people telling you to go to website X, share your bankaccount details, etc. They might scam you and plunder your bankaccount - or even worse: take out loans in your name - its really, really common nowadays.

Please also remember that your bank will never ever EVER email you concerning your bankaccount or transactions. Those emails, how scary or real they might seem to be ('Account blocked', 'Extra Security Measures', 'Check this Fraudulent Transation', etc.); it's all always fake !

The advice above is in line with most banks official guidelines, please don't make yourself vulnerable to online scams and contact your bank directly instead.

Disclaimer: FixYa is a really friendly, trustworthy and helpful community, but that still doesn't mean criminal can't or won't take advantage of it.

Jun 27, 2014 | PC Desktops

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How to Detect Online Scams


"Hey buddy, come over here. Listen, keep this quiet. I've got a friend overseas who's trying to come here. He's filthy rich but he has to go through a lot of red tape on his side and ours. I was hoping you could help me out by spotting me a few thousand dollars so that we could grease the wheels a little. Don't worry -- once he's over here he'll repay your investment 100 times over. What do you say?"

If a random stranger approached you on the street and said something like that, you'd probably ignore him and keep walking. You might even report him to the local police. Who would trust someone they had never met with that much money? But an online scam very similar to the scenario above has fooled thousands of people into giving away millions of dollars to the scam artists. It seems that people who might be able to smell a rat in a real life encounter become more gullible while online.

That particular scam goes by names like the Nigerian scam or the 419 scam. There are hundreds of variations on the scam but they all have the goal of fooling you into giving away as much money as possible -- up to and including your bank account information. And there are thousands of other scams online. Some share similarities to the Nigerian scam and others are completely different. A few will even install harmful software called malware onto your computer and become a persistent problem.

The best way to deal with online scams is to avoid them entirely. After all, you don't want to have to repair damage later. We're going to give you some tips on how to recognize a scam so that you won't be a victim. The first thing you need to remember is that old saying, "if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is."

Internet Scam Tactics Most scams play upon basic human qualities that everyone has to some degree. Many of these qualities are not very flattering. They include traits like fear, vanity and greed. Con artists have leveraged these traits for hundreds of years -- play upon a person's greed and you can convince them up is down and cold is hot.

That also means that most online scams have a few clear indicators. If you receive a message or visit a site that says you are in danger unless you download a certain application, that's a red flag for a scam. The message is playing upon your fear. Of course, you don't want to have your computer overrun with viruses. But often these applications are masking a virus or other form of malware. Always view these messages with skepticism and caution. Research any application before you download and install it.

Most of us would like to think we're not vain creatures. But imagine you're on a social networking site and you receive a message containing a hyperlink that says something like, "You won't believe how great you look in this video!" Most of us would be tempted to follow the link and watch the video, particularly if we were worried it might be embarrassing. With so many people and organizations on social networking sites, you never know who could be watching.

Scam artists know that people are concerned with their online image. That's why they use messages like the one above to direct people to a bogus video site. In many cases, attempting to play the video prompts a pop-up window to appear. The window claims the user doesn't have the right video driver installed to view the video. It prompts the user to download a driver and then the video will (supposedly) play. However, the driver turns out to be malware in disguise.

Some malware can can do pretty nasty stuff if you install it on your computer. A keylogging application could keep track of every keystroke you make and send that information to a remote scam artist. The scam artist can then comb through your keystrokes and find out private information like user names and passwords to the sites you visit, including banking or shopping sites. Others might give root access of your machine to a remote cracker -- a malicious hacker. The cracker can then control your computer and you might never even notice.

IS IT A SCAM

Out of all the base human traits scam artists prey upon, greed may be the one they target most. These scams tend to follow the pattern of promising a huge payoff for a relatively small investment. It's the old "something for nothing" approach. Many scam artists use e-mail to spread the con around. This allows the con artist to send out hundreds of thousands -- or even millions -- of e-mail messages to potential victims. Even if the success rate is a fraction of that number, the payoff for the scam artist can be huge.

When you see an offer online, really take some time to think it through. A little critical thinking can often save you money and frustration. Don't rely on the links or testimonials attached to the offer itself. Search around elsewhere for independent verification that the offer is valid. Some may be genuine offers, while others may try to lure you into a pyramid scheme or pump-and-dump scam.

Some common indicators of scams include:
  • A call for urgency such as, "You must act now!"
  • A promise of huge profits in a short timeframe
  • Overuse of buzzwords and jargon
  • Claims of insider information or confidential data

Scam artists will try to leverage anything to convince you to hand over money. Recently, some scam artists have even claimed to represent the United States government. The scam artists send messages to potential victims claiming to offer a portion of the economic stimulus package to help them out during the recession [source: Hruska].

Some potential victims have turned the tables on the scam artists. A Web site called 419 Eater urges people who have encountered scams to return the favor with scambaiting. The site defines scambaiting as luring scam artists into drawn-out correspondence in an effort to waste their time and resources. Some have gone so far as to convince the scam artists to travel halfway across the world or even carve a replica of a Commodore 64 computer out of wood! It turns out scam artists are just as vulnerable to greed as their victims.

on Dec 27, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I have got a massage that iam selected in a company icant understand whats it.


Please do not fall for any come on scams as clicking on it may harm your computer. Some of these internet hucksters say you have been selected to receive a gift or something else, and then ask for your personal data before they do anything and often it is just a scam to get your E-mail address to flood you with spam.

Jan 06, 2011 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

The advertised site on your page is a scam


Are You Referring To The Ads By Google? This Are Not In Any Way Affiliated With Fixya. They Are Merely A Program That Detects The Words You Type And Find Websites Who Pay For The Ads To Be There. If You Have A Problem With Your Acer Please Explain It To Us In This Forum And We Will Do Our Best To Find You A Solution. Sorry For Your Inconvenience.
Sincerely,
Michael Scott

Jul 22, 2009 | Acer Aspire™ T180 PC Desktop

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