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LF speaker in EVP X makes strange noise

D-644 LF speaker in my EVP X makes strange noise when volume is up
and music has full bass or drum peaks.
After opening the cabinet and disconnecting the speaker I saw that lower part of the cone is disconnected from metal base.
Any suggestions on how to fix it, glue it..????
thanks a lot

Posted by on

  • ashokanandpu Nov 21, 2008

    It is a Wharfedale EVP X-15 speaker, not a receiver, in question. And yes I still need a solution for this problem.

    Ashokanand


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5 Suggested Answers

  • 624 Answers

SOURCE: Loud and strange noises

The built-in speaker amp or the volume switch may be going bad on you. A quick test is to disconnect the speaker set and replace it with a headphone or another working speaker set. If it behaves normally then the problem is in your original speakers, if not then you may have software driver issues or less likely an issue with the sound card. Let us know what you find out.

Posted on Jul 28, 2007

james klgr
  • 362 Answers

SOURCE: Sharp Aquos rattling bass

the sharp some models dont put a spacer between the speaker and the case causing the speaker to hit the case at med to high volume you can check this and make you a spacer out of washers on each screw that mounts the speakers between the case and peaker frame make sure that the washers or spacers you use dont contact the speaker core. and dont do anything that will void the warrenty if nothing else let the store fix it.

Posted on Dec 12, 2007

  • 1694 Answers

SOURCE: Denon AVR-1601 Receiver

Check capacitors in power supply......also check for over-heated
resistors..all 1 ohm.....replace if cooked...................T.

Posted on Jan 05, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: The bass speaker doesnt work

OK, Bose owners out there listen up and listen good. Here's the real scoop on 1.(getting access to the inside of most bose subwoofers, 2.( repairing said subwoofer.
 
Follow these steps in removing the cover of your subwoofer. Unscrew the two screws from the cover. (They are on the input/output side of the cover) Remove the two knobs (Bass and treble volume).
 
On the opposite side of the cover, (put those damn shoes back in the closet) there is a lockout tab that needs to be swung out, it moves 90 degrees in a counter-clockwise direction and is located under the center of the cover.
 
A small flat blade screwdriver works great for swinging this tab out and will be necessary for the next step (the screwdriver that is).
 
On the same side (opposite the input/output side) there are two small tabs near the edges of the cover, one on the right and it's counterpart on the left. If you look closely in the gap between the cover and the sub itself, you will see these 3/8" wide tabs near the edges and towards the top of the cover.
 
With the flat blade screwdriver, put the blade between the cover and on the tab and pull down. Then with your hand balled into a fist, gently hit that side of the cover towards the input/output side. the cover will move only slightly but the tab should remain depressed.
 
Do the same procedure on the opposite side of the cover and it will slide about a 1/2 to 3/4" towards the input/output side and can then be removed by pulling it straight up and off of the cabinet.
 
Yay! If you get this far without incident then you are ready to implement repairs. In the case of the AM15's, normally what happens is a resistor will open up and prevent the triac (turn-on device) from firing.
 
The fuse is on the underside of the PC board and this above mentioned resistor is a 100 ohm, surface mount "chip" resistor on the top side of the PC board. It will not appear to be bad but trust me, if the fuse is good and the sub will not turn on... replace it!
 
You don't have to use a chip resistor since as a consumer you may have a rough time finding one but a 1/8 watt or 1/4 watt resistor you can find at any Radio Shack will work just dandy in this application.
 
Cut the leads short and solder the two cut leads to the pads on the circuit board where the chip resistor is currently sitting. The chip resistor will be black, about 1/4" long, 1/8" wide and have "101" printed on it's surface. On some models they used two 200 ohm resistors in parallel but the result is the same. One 1/4w axial lead resistor will do just fine. Plug it up and give it a try. (Before you replace the cover).
 
Secondly, if the fuse is blown on a "Lifestyle" Bose subwoofer, contrary to popular belief, it blew for a reason. The speaker outputs and the subwoofer output devices are TDA7294 IC's with TIP142 and TIP147 Motorola transistors used as current supplements to these said output devices. If the fuse is blown and replacing it only results in another blown fuse then chances are good that one or more of these are blown. In some cases it's very easy to tell, the front of these IC's will be blown off and/or you will see burn marks on the board where they are mounted. These devices are located inside the amp portion of the subwoofer. (The black metal heatsink underneath the input/preamp PCB. As a consumer, if the fuse is blown, unless you are familiar with soldering techniques and troubleshooting electronics, leave this to the pro's. It isn't as easy as you might think and you can destroy the PCB in your attempts to repair it.
 
 This was from a Guru of Bose systems at ecoustics.com: Mark Burgess

Posted on May 11, 2008

tech48
  • 624 Answers

SOURCE: marantz sr 4200

This is an indication of some bad solder connections on one of the boards. It could be the power supply board, amp board, or the digital board. I would like to be more specific, but this is not a common problem with those symptoms. Bad solder connection are a common problem and can cause many different unusual symptoms. Unless you have excellent soldering skills, it would be best to let a service center repair this for you. This is a very good receiver and is well worth getting fixed. If you have excellent soldering skills and are willing to take a chance on fixing it yourself you could save yourself some money, but be aware that if you make even one mistake while soldering, you could easily cause much more damage than you started with. Some of the components that may need to be resoldered are surface mounted IC's that are very difficult to resolder and if you have never done this before it is not a good idea to start learning how to solder on such a nice receiver.

Let me know if you need any further help.

Dave

Posted on Oct 27, 2008

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