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Protection circuit trips a low audio output level MX-W50

Receiver/cd player/cassette recorder-player (Dual Drive)/AMP. Hitachi MX-W50

Regardless of program source the output protection circuit trips at any but very low sound level. If one channel is ''ballanced out'' the other can play at a higher level without tripping. Output heatsink is cool.

I'm unable to find a service or owner's manual or even a schematic.

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  • stantonlw Nov 20, 2008

    Thanks,



    Went down that road. With only one speaker hooked up and the ballance shifted to the attached spkr, the trip level was about twice what it was with both spkrs connected. Exchanged spkrs with no change in results.



    As the heatsink is not getting warm, I surmise the shutdown is based on a current sense, possibloy in the stability feedback circuits of the power amp but without a schematic, I'm kinda stuck.



    L

  • mpsa95 Jan 03, 2009

    Yamaha-RX-V620 RDS.

    The problem is similar. Center, left and left-rear channels sometimes are sound with noise at low output level instead of the volume level is high. And sometimes they do not produce any sound at all. It seems to me, I have unfortunately shorted the output of the left-rear speaker and the problem is the result of it.
    If volume level adjusted to higher values the speakers produce defective sound, at low volume (<-60 db) level they are not sound at all.

    Disconnecting of any speakers not results in normal operation of connected ones. When I connect the "silent" speaker to properly-operating channel it results in good sound from the speaker. Connecting
    the good speaker to "silent" channel results in silence. So, I think that speakers and wires are OK, but some channels are not.

    How to solve the problem? Has anybody the service manual or schematic of the device? If you have one, please, send it or link on it to my e-mail: mpsa@list.ru.

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When you unplug one speaker (from the back of the receiver) and the rec. works good, then the speaker that you unplugged is the bad one, or the wire that is hooked up to that speaker is bad. Repair the speaker or the wire.

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

  • Randy Sheppard Nov 20, 2008

    What happens when all of the speakers are not plugged in and you turn up the volume?

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