Question about Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

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I can not set the ISO to 100 on my 40D

Somtimes the ISO does not totally work, or when i press the ISO botton the camra stops working and i have to take the battery out and then restart the camera.

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  • Anonymous Nov 25, 2008

    I also have the 100 ISO problem. The only thing I recall doing is plugging the camera to my computer (Using the Canon Software) and embedding my name in the camera. This was around the same time when my 100 went away.

  • Anonymous Jan 08, 2009

    Setting ISO to 100 or H (3200) suddenly stopped working. I experienced this after a fotosession in quite cold weather (around minus 5 celcius). Also the font changed (the two last zeroes of the ISO number went smaller) both in the top display and in the LCD.

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Check if your Highlight Tone Priority is turned ON. Once ON, the ISO is limited to between 200 and 1600 until you disable Highlight Tone Priority. Also, all your zeros will be replaced by the letter 'o' to remind you that it is ON (Eg 2oo instead of 200)

Posted on May 01, 2009

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I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...


If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
steve_con_96.jpg
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.

steve_con_97.jpg

Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do I set the Iso and flash


ISO is the sensitivity to light. The lower numbers 80, 100, 200 are the LEAST sensitive (but provide the best looking pictures). Sensitivity has to do with the amount of light needed to properly expose an image. ISO is a part of exposure that works with Aperture (f stop) and shutter speed (in seconds - or fractional seconds). Here's how it looks:

steve_con_63.jpg

The graphic above shows that varying either of these three values changes the exposure. If you change one by one step, you have to change one of the others by one step to get about the same exposure result. Each of the step values on your camera for the shutter, aperture and ISO is twice as much as the previous value. ISO 1600 is 2x ISO 800, which is 2x ISO 400, and 2x ISO 200 and finally, 2x ISO 100 (some cameras go to ISO 50 or less!).

The shutter works the same way: 1/1000 is 2x faster than 1/500, and 2x 1/125, and 2x 1/60, and 2 x 1/30, etc. These are easy to see the how each is twice as much as the other.

Finally, the aperture. Each "f stop" allows 2x as much light as the previous value. f2 lets 2x as much light as f2.8, which lets in 2x as much as f4, etc. I know the number don't double like you would expect, and the smaller numbers allow more light (you'd think it was the other way around) - but it's because we're talking about a circular lenses and it has to do with how we calculate area of a circle (3.14 x R squared). It may be easier to recall small numbers = equal large openings by thinking of f numbers with a "1/" over them - like this: 1/f1.4, or 1/f2, 1/f2.8, etc. Here's a chart that shows how aperture and shutter speed work together at one ISO setting.

steve_con_64.jpg

Read them across, the top line shows that 1/250 @ f1.4 is the SAME as 1/125 @ f2.0, which is also the SAME as shooting 1/60 @ 2.8, etc. If you were to increase the by one step, the shutter speeds would increase by a factor of two. Twice as much light by opening the aperture by a single stop means you must halve the exposure time or halve the ISO value. Likewise, if it's too dark to get a decent picture; increase exposure time or ISO value to capture enough light.

Assume a properly exposed picture requires 1/30 of a second at f5.6 with ISO 200. If the camera was increased by one step to ISO 400, you can take the picture a f5.6 still but in 1/60 sec - greatly reducing the chance of blur from holding the camera in you hand. You could even go up one more step to ISO 400 and shoot in 1/125 sec, which would reduce the blur even more. Fast shutter speeds reduce the "camera shake" and stop motion in sports photography - or other moving objects. If you had the camera set up on a tripod, you could dial the ISO down to ISO 100 and shoot at 1/30 of a sec at f5.6. If your lens can open up to f4, you can shoot in half the time because the lens is letting in twice the light. Some point and shoot cameras don't allow changing f stops or even shutter speeds - so all you can do it raise and lower ISO.

Which camera and flash do you have?

May 23, 2011 | Digital Cameras

2 Answers

Hi, I have a Canon T2i Rebel. When i put the camera in "M" (totally manual), the image doesnt appear in the LCD screen. Everything else works fine in the monitor, but it is as if the lens where...


That's great news, so let's write it up as a solution so that other people who search on here find the right information!

So it appears that the Canon T2i when in manual mode (M) remembers whatever settings you play with, and that these settings are remembered across power cycles; in other words, turning the camera off, or switching to auto before going back to manual does NOT put the settings back to a default.

This gives you the opportunity to set choices that make the screen view totally white or totally black, and unless you realise what you did, you can fear that your camera is broken in some way. At first, I thought this was a user interface flaw, but at least with the screen black or white, you know which way you need to go to get your picture back! The settings that affect brightness are Shutter Speed, Aperture Value, and ISO Rating. They are accessed in manual mode with the thumbwheel, alone, with Av, and after pressing the ISO button, respectively.

One more little bit of trivia: when in manual mode if you don't have live view on, when you half press the shutter, a little indicator comes up on the exposure scale, so that you can see how the settings you've chosen are going to come out.

P.S. I noticed that there was a forum especially for your camera, you might like to join it, it's called t2iforum dot com.

Jan 24, 2011 | Canon EOS 550D Rebel T2i Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash stopped working


Hi,

The flash in the Camera can be enabled to Flash Forced ON by pressing the Up Arrow control button on the Camera. Press the button continuously to select the desired settings.
Make sure that the Camera Mode (REC MODE) is not set to Burst or Multi Burst.
Flash will not work when the Camera is set to ISO High Sensitivity mode or Twilight mode in the Scene Selection.
The flash will not work in Movie Mode also.
When using the Landscape, snow or Beach mode, set the Scene Selection to Flash Forced On.

This should resolve the issue.

Thanks for using FixYa.
We wish you a Happy Holiday Season!!

Dec 26, 2010 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W70 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I NEED HELP WITH MY CAMRA


adjust ISO of your camra to higher number

Jul 05, 2009 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hi, My pentax optio WP don't work anymore. When i switch it on, it stops after 5 seconds. If i start it in read mode (blue button pressed whil i switch it on), it works, but the menu button dont't work and...


Some of those buttons work in combination with the two dials (i.e., setting ISO and white balance, etc.). Hold a buttin down and user the knobs simoultaneously.
If this is not the issue, please describe specifically which buttons are not workin...

thank u rate me!!

Jun 28, 2009 | Pentax Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Manual shooting mode problem.


The exposure compensation dial (at the back) doesn't work when you're in Manual. In Manual, you set the shutter speed and aperture to get an image with the amount of over- or under-exposure you need. In the view finder, the "exposure meter" at the bottom shows how much light there is where the lens is pointed. When it shows what you called "2-stops", its really underexposed. Thus your black images. You need to increase ISO, open the aperture and slow down the shutter speed (or a combination of these 3 options)

Set your camera to P or full-auto. Do the photos turn out ok? If they do, then there's nothing wrong with your camera and you just need practise on the Manual mode.

Aug 13, 2008 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed


Did You ever use a SLR back in the stone age when all we had was film?
Film was/is rated with a ISO number, the higher the number the faster the film.
Fast film had fewer and larger grains of silver iodide, (the particles that changed tone, color etc.when exposed to light), therefore it took less light to take a picture.

The down side was a increase in grain. Large grains meant that blow ups, 8x10, 11x14, posters, etc were not as sharp,
as with slow ( low ISO film)
Most outdoor photos had plenty of light so the film had more grains ( high ISO) to capture the available light, and the result was a much sharper image.

Portrait photography used very very slow film ( your 50 ISO setting) but in a studio you had all the artificial lighting you needed, so your portrait came out with very fine detail.

Now the FE-280 does not have a shutter setting, but we can compensate by changing the ISO setting, and the overall effect will be.
Fastest= 1600 ISO for very little light and poorest picture quality.
Slowest=50 ISO for plenty of light and the highest picture quality

200 ISO was the most popular because it worked well outdoors and indoors with a flash, with very good overall picture quality.

400 ISO was a good choice for gloomy days and medium lighting conditions.

Your ISO settings on the FE-280 will have a similar effect.
My best advice is to play around with the different settings until you develop a knack for it, we used to use light meters and a lot of guesswork, quite expensive when you had to buy film and pay for processing.

OK enough history. heres how....
Turn dial to (P) PROGRAMAUTO
Press (MENU)
The camera menu in center is bracketed, Press (OK)
Scroll down one bar on the on screen menu to (ISO)
Press (OK)
Scroll up or down to desired ISO
Press (OK)
TAH DA !

All other functions will be automatic or any other setting that you might choose..
If you change the dial and later go back again to (P) it will retain your selected ISO setting, which is displayed, on screen.

I hope I was help full, and you enjoy some of the special effects that you will now be able try.
By the way... good taste in cameras.
Best regards, Paul

May 18, 2008 | Olympus FE-280 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Outdoor pictures reveal white on LCD screen


The sensor for the auto-ISO may be working incorrectly. Try changing the ISO manually for different light modes. You can also try to change the white balance of the LCD. -Setting the white balance: 1. Set the camera to still image mode 2. Press the "Set" button 3. "White Balance" should be the current selection 4. Press the "Flower" button or "Flash" button to move through the available options for white balance 5. Press "Set" again when change appropriately - Setting the ISO: The higher the ISO value, the less light the camera needs to make an exposure, allowing the same exposure to be achieved with higher shutter speeds or smaller apertures. In a digital camera, higher ISO value allows higher shutter speed, at the expense of mottled or grain appearing in the final picture. 1. Set the camera to Still Image mode. 2. Press the "Set" button. 3. Press the "scn" or "timer" button to select ?ISO?. 4. Press the "Flower" or "Flash" button to select the desired setting. 5. Press the "set" button to select. 50/100/200 In the same lighting condition, the higher the ISO value is, the faster the shutter speed will be. I hope this helps.

Aug 06, 2007 | Polaroid i832 Digital Camera

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