Question about Honeywell CT87B ROUND HEATING&COOLING MECHANICAL THERMOSTAT - WHITE Heater

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Thermostat keeps calling for heat even when turned off

Don't really know what kind of heating system is being used cause i rent, but im pretty sure its gas and i know there are only two wires behind the thermostat, my old honeywell mercury button unit blew out and the landlord put this new honeywell in and now the heat won't shut off unless i take the unit off the wall. he put one wire in the r, and the other in w.. what do to correct it so i can turn heat on and off when i want?

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  • rklemyk Dec 20, 2008

    I have a similar problem but with one variation.

    My thermostat is calling for the heat but the air handler isn't engaging all of the time unless I turn the thermostat on and off. It usually goes on then and heats fine. I notice that each time that I experience this problem, I can hear a gurgling or flowing water-like sound approximately below the thermostat. It's almost as if there is an air bubble or the like that needs to be burst before the air handler engages. Like I said, this isn't all of the time; but lately it's happening in the middle of the night. The temperature will drop 4 - 6 degrees and I'll awake to the gurgling sound as the thermostat is close to my bed. I will then have to get up, turn the thermostat off for a minute or so and the bubble (if that is what is is) clears and the handler kicks in. I notice that there is an audible popping sound that occurs above me where the air handler is located in the attic.

    I have a two-zone system, propane-fueled with two old, round thermostats controlling the temp in my house.

    Can anyone advise?

    Thank you in advance.

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3 Suggested Answers

jcpark50
  • 52 Answers

SOURCE: Need to know which terminals run what

Had similar problem, continuous fan, turn off power, then won't start up. Replaced thermostat, no change. The main controller board in the furnace went bad. What was weird was that it happened in the summer, while the heat was turned off. One day I noticed that the fan was running. The thermostat was in the off position, and I had to shut off power to the furnace to make it stop. I forgot about it till heating season came along and it wouldn't start up. The preliminary blower would start, the gas would click on, it would light, then quit. After tracing and checking the various safety switches, etc. it became apparrent the main board was bad. I found one on ebay, replaced it, [a simple job, unplug, a few screws, replug] and it's been working fine..good luck, John

Posted on Nov 07, 2008

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Replacing Round Honewell Mercury Thermostat

try to get one that is made for oil heat, the installation is easy only two wires, and the instructions make it easy.

Posted on Apr 26, 2009

Therinnaiguy
  • 1420 Answers

SOURCE: Three wires not marked for new Thermostat!

You will need to go to the heating system and see what color wires are hooked to that. Typically the black and white wires will be used unless they used another color due to a bad wire. Hook the colored wires to the R or RH terminal on the thermostat and the other wire to the W terminal. You can also try taking the wires you have and one by one twisting them together and have a second person inform you when the heating system turns on. Take those two wires and hook them to the terminals I mentioned above.

Posted on Jan 14, 2010

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The connections that you really need to reference would be at the air handler itself. That would tell you which wires go outside to the heat pump and which wires go to the air handler. I can however give you some basics that may help.

Heat Pump Wiring
Terminals/Colors/Function
R- Red- 24v power supply. (Usually a jumper between RC/RH)
G- Green- Fan
W- White- Heat (Sometimes W1-W2, first or second stage heat)
Y- Yellow- Cooling (Same applies as above i.e. Y1-Y2)
C- Common (Most people use blue unless it is used for B terminal and sometimes cooling on older 4 wire systems.
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Note: Considering that the installer had their own way to run all wires, use different wires, connections, etc. This is just a reference to common wiring in the field.

How the most common system is hooked up:
Thermostat:
Red wire goes to R terminal
Yellow wire goes to Y1 or Y2 terminal
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Blue wire goes to C terminal, unless its being used as stated above.

This is without using a fossil fuel kit or zone control board.

Where do they go from the thermostat?
Red
goes to the air handler transformer or board and goes outside to heat pump to power low voltage controls.
Yellow wire goes straight outside to Y terminals on heat pump unless going to a board inside first.
Green goes to the air handler fan relay.
Common goes to the air handler and outside to heat pump.
Black or Orange will go outside to heat pump terminals for reversing valve.
White usually goes outside to heat pump,and inside to air handler. Will explain reason further down.
Brown will go to the air handler to the heat relay for the emergency heat.

On a call for heat, with a powered cooling system (more common).
The R, Y, and G terminals energize, sending a signal to start the blower and pull in the contactor outside. Note that the Y terminal is usually cooling, but since this is a powered cooling system, the reversing valve is not energized, causing the system to run in heat mode. If you have powered heating, the reversing valve terminal will energize also. Depending on thermostat, if you set the temp substantially higher than room temp, it may kick on the emergency/aux heat to quickly raise the room temp. On a call for emergency/aux heat, the R, G, and E/Aux terminals are energized, turning on the electric/gas heat instead of the heat pump. This comes in handy since the heat pump can only pull so much heat from outside before its not enough to properly warm the house, usually around 30 degrees outside temp. If you are running the heat pump and the system goes into "defrost", the outside unit will send a signal back to the air handler, through the white wire I mentioned earlier, to tell the emergency/aux heat to come on while it is in defrost mode, providing heat whenever needed.

Again, this is just a reference guide to some basic wiring, but hopefully it will tell you where the problem is or at the least, give you a good start. There are variables in which things can change the wiring like a zoning system or fossil fuel kit. Even then, you should be able to get pretty close. Hope this helps and Happy Holidays!

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Sorry, neither of these answers are completely correct.
You have a heat pump (or the wrong thermostat). Let's assume you have a heat pump.

In air conditioning mode, it works like every air conditioner you have ever had, but...

In heat mode, it reverses its operation. Have you ever felt the air coming out of the outdoor unit of your A/C unit? It's hot, isn't it. And the air coming out of the indoor unit (out of the registers) is cold. Now for a heat pump to produce heat it simply runs the air conditioner in reverse and the heat comes out in the house and the cold is released outside. Neat, huh!

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