Question about Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens

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No flash, blerry pictures, very slow shutter speed

And sometimes shutter gets stuck dose not always take pictures

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I took it back to the store and exchanged it I hope this one is better I like this camera and for a $500. camera it should not be acting like that thank you

Posted on Nov 13, 2008

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My D60 only when I use the flash I get an error message job nr


Job NR is usually associated with the camera's processing time during very slow shutters. If you wait long enough it will show you the image you've taken but because the shutter is very slow, the image will be blurry and unrecognizable. On manual mode or Shutter speed priority change your shutter speed to at least .125 of a second. That should fix the problem.

Apr 16, 2013 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

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Shutter will not open every time i take a photo. The photo always comes out black on the view finder


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, sometimes with lines, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open). To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Aug 27, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Outside picture are white


Make sure the ISO is set to the lowest number or even to "auto ISO". The best way to avoid these lighting problems is to adjust your aperture settings, your shutter speed and your film speed when shooting. Additional details about thus sibject could find in the Samsung_S500_Owners_Manual in section about Settings & Mode.

Its possible that you are interesnting to check other
information, so visit this two sites Fix-Overexposed and this other take-better-photos-in-5-easy-steps.

Finally, remote but possible, could be t
he symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter, this are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, sometimes with lines, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open). To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Hope helps.

Apr 29, 2011 | Samsung Digimax S500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are blurry


There are a few things to consider:

-- Are your hands steady as you take the shot, and are you moving the camera before the shutter actually clicks? As a test, put the camera down on a table top and take a picture without moving the camera until well after the shutter clicks. If the resulting image is not blurry--you just proved that your holding technique needs improvement!

--This camera has image stabilization to help you deal with camera shake--do you have this feature turned on in the menu?

--If your subjects are moving and your shutter speed is slow (meaning that the shutter stays open a relatively long time to gather enough light) then you will get blur. And, even if your subject is not moving but the shutter speed is slow, then your camera shake will come back to haunt you.

To fix slow shutter speed, you can either use a flash to freeze the action, or you can manually increase the ISO setting to a higher number, or you can choose a preset like "sports" which will tell the camera you want faster shutter speeds. A higher ISO setting will allow for faster shutter speeds, but it can also result in a grainy look, called "noise" if you set it too high.

Most likely it is your holding technique and the setting you are choosing that is causing the blur. If you are in decently bright light outdoors, you hold your camera steady and wait for the shutter to click, and you have image stabilization on, then you should have sharp pictures. If you are indoors, expect to need a flash.

Nov 25, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SX100 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

The Screen always shows black and it takes all black pictures


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, sometimes with lines, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open). To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Sep 07, 2010 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The shutter speed seems really slow so the picture always comes out fuzzy. How can I change the shutter speed?


You can't change the shutter speed but you can set the ISO to a higher number thereby forcing the shutter to speed up.

Jun 26, 2010 | HP Photosmart E327 Digital Camera

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Nikon D60 Digital SLR--Slow Shutter Speed


Your're probably using a flash with TTL disabled. So 1/200 is the highest sync possible with that kind of flash. Did you try removing the flash off the body and setting faster shutter speeds?

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1 Answer

Pictures are not sharp


On most camers that means you are going to get a blurry photo because of camera shake. Using the flash should take care of it. You may have the flash set to "flash off" mode accidently, and in insufficient light the shutter speed is too slow to stop blur.

Mar 17, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Blurred images


This is mainly due to the slow shutter speed selected by your CAM. in low light situations the cam chooses a slow shutter speed to expose the image adequately. Any shakes that may have caused during the shutter operation will cause the funny images.

use tripod or other kind of support to your camera while shootiing in low light (indoors) without flash.

Oct 11, 2008 | Olympus Stylus 760 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash vs No Flash


Probably what's happening is that the shutter speed is automatically adjusted to a faster speed with flash. With no flash the shutter speed slows down to compensate for the lack of light, therefore leaving it open longer. So while you are holding the camera during a longer exposure you are promoting camera shake, thus blurry pictures. The LED may tell you information you need to know like shutter speed, apture, flash on/off, etc.

Sep 12, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-750 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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