Question about Toshiba 32AF45 32" TV

2 Answers

Will not turn on

My tv had a power surge from lightning possibly through the cable connection. the fuse was not blown but i did find a blown capacitor-250v1uf near the heat sink. i did replace it with a new one and it still wont turn on. i do have 110v going to the small transformer and when you plug the tv in it sounds like it wants to power up because it will sound like when you turn it on, sounds like static. what should i look for next? thanks!

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  • Kent LeBourdais Nov 04, 2006

    the static lasts for about one second and i will flicker the lights in the house for about a second also.

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2 Answers

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  • 337 Answers

The power surges and lighting damages are ussually extensive,alot of times more than one component and more than one circuit gets damage,home owner insurance cover this damages but the insurance company does not repair the damaged unit they replace them because is not worth repairing.To troubleshoot you will need the squematic diagram to locate and correct the different circuits that might be involved ,be careful there are voltages that can hurt you if you are not too familiar and touch one by accident.

Posted on Nov 05, 2006

  • Omar Urrutia
    Omar Urrutia Nov 05, 2006

    Your rating response is also important.

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Q502, R541, D523 along with the cap you replaced should cure the problem...

Posted on Jan 24, 2008

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1 Answer

Our electricity went out for a few minutes, and since then the TV will not turn on. The green light is flashing. We tried resetting it by pushing a pen point into the reset hole, but it does nothing. ...


Your power outage may have been caused by a nearby lightning strike, or any number of
1000 different reasons that cause power surges, brown-outs, voltage spikes, inductive loading,
and/or utility pole breaker trips and resets (this accounts for your power loss (a pole breaker trip),
followed by restoration of power (the pole breaker automatically reset) - even plain old high electrical demand causing an overload due to air conditioning demands caused by hot weather.
When the pole breaker reset, your TV caught a power surge.
Whenever a power outage occurs, quickly power off (or better, unplug) any/all computers, TVs,
etc. that are not protected by surge-protection.
As an electrician, when someone loses an item of electronics concommitant to an electrical
anomaly, its almost
always traceable to a nearby lightning strike (or the power company provided equivalent), accompanied by inadequate surge protection for
the VCR/TV/Computer/Stereo/uninsured valuable electronic item/XBOX 360/Nintendo Wii.
Surge protection can
be provided by the consumer at the power strip (a good one with builtin MOV protection and a
warranty costs $20, whereas a zero-protection 4-outlet or 6-outlet power strip will cost $4-$5).
Your electrician can provide whole-house surge protection where a whole-house MOV-based (metal oxide varistor) surge protector, or per-circuit protection can be installed with
a GFCI breaker (or better, an AFCI breaker) can be installed.
GFCI = ground fault circuit interruptor
AFCI = Arc fault circuit interruptor
Lightning protection is especially important in Florida, which is the "lightning capital of the world."
I've never found a good solution to lightning-fried electronics (random power supply components are destroyed and/or fuse blown), other than renters insurance or homeowners insurance.

Your only real hope for an economical fix is to look for a blown fuse, and replace it.

If desperate to attempt a fix on your own, you could try replacing the entire TV power supply as a module, but even this provides
no guarantee of a fix - lightning damage can extend beyond the power supply.
When traveling, I will always unplug everything before I leave (except the security system),
and also turn off the breakers to unneeded house circuits (which kills the wall switches that
control interior lighting - forcing a burglar to use their flashlight instead of interior lighting)
which is the least convenient lightning protection, but highly effective, and cheap (free).

Sep 05, 2011 | Mitsubishi WS-55511 55" Rear Projection...

2 Answers

After a lightning storm, my TV will not turn on. Is there a fuse or something on the in coming power that may have blown causing it not to turn on?


Any TV subjected to a power surge will have problems. If you can remove the back cover, do so. Locate the glass fuse. In the best situations the fuse is clear and opened, and replacement will repair your TV. In worst cases the fuse may be blackened, and you will see that many components are burned and shattered. If this latter is true, only replacing the TV is your best bet. In many cases electronics may be connected to surge protectors, but lightning will over ride these devices and cause damage. I have seen this happen many times.Thanks for asking and show all hands of support!

Jun 23, 2011 | Sanyo AVM-3659S 36" TV

1 Answer

My TV we belive was affected by lightning. The TV was connected in a small Monster surge protector with a VCR. The VCR was unscathed but the TV will not power up or turn on. I read there could be a fuse...


There has to be some form of a fuse that is in the AC power line, it may be a square ceramic fuse or a regular cartridge fuse, chances are its blown if the set is dead after a lightning storm, unfortunately if you replace it there is a really good chance it will blow again, if it does then the rectifier diodes would be shorted and need replacing or you could replace the power supply if your unable to repair it yourself

Dec 20, 2017 | Dynex DX-L26-10A 26 in. HD-Ready LCD TV

3 Answers

Power surge or electrical outage tv blue light stays on with humming sound no picture


Hello,

Power surges or nearby lightning strikes can destroy electronic equipment. However, most of the time, damage is minimal or at least easily repaired. With a direct hit, you may not recognize what is left of it!Ideally, electronic equipment should be unplugged (both AC line and phone line!) during electrical storms if possible. Modern TVs, VCRs, microwave ovens, and even stereo equipment is particularly susceptible to lightning and surge damage because some parts of the circuitry are always alive and therefore have a connection to the AC line. Telephones, modems, and faxes are directly connected to the phone lines. Better designs include filtering and surge suppression components built in. With a near-miss, the only thing that may happen is for the internal fuse to blow or for the microcontroller to go bonkers and just require power cycling. There is no possible protection against a direct strike. However, devices with power switches that totally break the line connection are more robust since it takes much more voltage to jump the gap in the switch than to fry electronic parts. Monitors and TVs may also have their CRTs magnetized due to the electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike - similar but on a smaller scale to the EMP of a nuclear detonation.
Was the TV operating or on standby at the time? If it was switched off using an actual power switch (not a logic pushbutton or the remote control), then either a component in front of the switch has blown, the surge was enough to jump the gap between the switch contacts, or it was just a coincidence (yeh, right).
If the TV was operating or on standby or has no actual power switch, then a number of parts could be fried.
TVs usually have their own internal surge protection devices like MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) after the fuse. So it is possible that all that is wrong is that the line fuse has blown. Remove the cover (unplug it first!) and start at the line cord. If you find a blown fuse, remove it and measure across the in-board side of fuse holder and the other (should be the neutral) side of the line. The ohmmeter reading should be fairly high - well certainly not less than 100 ohms - in at least one direction. You may need to unplug the degaussing coil to get a reasonable reading as its resistance may be 25 or 30 ohms. If the reading is really low, there are other problems. If the resistance checks out, replace the fuse and try powering the TV. There will be 3 possibilities:
  1. It will work fine, problem solved.
  2. It will immediately blow the fuse. This means there is at least one component shorted - possibilities include an MOV, line rectifiers, main filter cap, regulator transistor, horizontal output transistor, etc. You will need to check with your ohmmeter for shorted semiconductors. Remove any that are suspect and see of the fuse now survives (use the series light bulb to cut your losses
  3. It will not work properly or appear dead. This could mean there are open fusable resistors other defective parts in the power supply or elsewhere. In this case further testing will be required and at some point you may need the schematic
hope this helpout......

Jul 08, 2010 | Element Electronics Televison & Video

1 Answer

This morning I tried to turn my RCA TV (model 24R411T) on and nothing happened. I tried plugging it into a different outlet, still nothing. I tried leaving it unplugged about 10 minutes and trying again,...


Hello,

Power surges or nearby lightning strikes can destroy electronic equipment. However, most of the time, damage is minimal or at least easily repaired. With a direct hit, you may not recognize what is left of it!

Ideally, electronic equipment should be unplugged (both AC line and phone line!) during electrical storms if possible. Modern TVs, VCRs, microwave ovens, and even stereo equipment is particularly susceptible to lightning and surge damage because some parts of the circuitry are always alive and therefore have a connection to the AC line. Telephones, modems, and faxes are directly connected to the phone lines. Better designs include filtering and surge suppression components built in. With a near-miss, the only thing that may happen is for the internal fuse to blow or for the microcontroller to go bonkers and just require power cycling. There is no possible protection against a direct strike. However, devices with power switches that totally break the line connection are more robust since it takes much more voltage to jump the gap in the switch than to fry electronic parts. Monitors and TVs may also have their CRTs magnetized due to the electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike - similar but on a smaller scale to the EMP of a nuclear detonation.

Was the TV operating or on standby at the time? If it was switched off using an actual power switch (not a logic pushbutton or the remote control), then either a component in front of the switch has blown, the surge was enough to jump the gap between the switch contacts, or it was just a coincidence (yeh, right).

If the TV was operating or on standby or has no actual power switch, then a number of parts could be fried.

TVs usually have their own internal surge protection devices like MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) after the fuse. So it is possible that all that is wrong is that the line fuse has blown. Remove the cover (unplug it first!) and start at the line cord. If you find a blown fuse, remove it and measure across the in-board side of fuse holder and the other (should be the neutral) side of the line. The ohmmeter reading should be fairly high - well certainly not less than 100 ohms - in at least one direction. You may need to unplug the degaussing coil to get a reasonable reading as its resistance may be 25 or 30 ohms. If the reading is really low, there are other problems. If the resistance checks out, replace the fuse and try powering the TV. There will be 3 possibilities:

It will work fine, problem solved.

It will immediately blow the fuse. This means there is at least one component shorted - possibilities include an MOV, line rectifiers, main filter cap, regulator transistor, horizontal output transistor, etc. You will need to check with your ohmmeter for shorted semiconductors. Remove any that are suspect and see of the fuse now survives (use the series light bulb to cut your losses - see the section.

It will not work properly or appear dead. This could mean there are open fusable resistors other defective parts in the power supply or elsewhere. In this case further testing will be required and at some point you may need the schematic.

Jun 14, 2010 | RCA 27R411T 27" TV

2 Answers

Tv won't turn on after a storm.


Hello,

Power surges or nearby lightning strikes can destroy electronic equipment. However, most of the time, damage is minimal or at least easily repaired. With a direct hit, you may not recognize what is left of it!

Ideally, electronic equipment should be unplugged (both AC line and phone line!) during electrical storms if possible. Modern TVs, VCRs, microwave ovens, and even stereo equipment is particularly susceptible to lightning and surge damage because some parts of the circuitry are always alive and therefore have a connection to the AC line. Telephones, modems, and faxes are directly connected to the phone lines. Better designs include filtering and surge suppression components built in. With a near-miss, the only thing that may happen is for the internal fuse to blow or for the microcontroller to go bonkers and just require power cycling. There is no possible protection against a direct strike. However, devices with power switches that totally break the line connection are more robust since it takes much more voltage to jump the gap in the switch than to fry electronic parts. Monitors and TVs may also have their CRTs magnetized due to the electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike - similar but on a smaller scale to the EMP of a nuclear detonation.

Was the TV operating or on standby at the time? If it was switched off using an actual power switch (not a logic pushbutton or the remote control), then either a component in front of the switch has blown, the surge was enough to jump the gap between the switch contacts, or it was just a coincidence (yeh, right).

If the TV was operating or on standby or has no actual power switch, then a number of parts could be fried.

TVs usually have their own internal surge protection devices like MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) after the fuse. So it is possible that all that is wrong is that the line fuse has blown. Remove the cover (unplug it first!) and start at the line cord. If you find a blown fuse, remove it and measure across the in-board side of fuse holder and the other (should be the neutral) side of the line. The ohmmeter reading should be fairly high - well certainly not less than 100 ohms - in at least one direction. You may need to unplug the degaussing coil to get a reasonable reading as its resistance may be 25 or 30 ohms. If the reading is really low, there are other problems. If the resistance checks out, replace the fuse and try powering the TV. There will be 3 possibilities:

It will work fine, problem solved.

It will immediately blow the fuse. This means there is at least one component shorted - possibilities include an MOV, line rectifiers, main filter cap, regulator transistor, horizontal output transistor, etc. You will need to check with your ohmmeter for shorted semiconductors. Remove any that are suspect and see of the fuse now survives.

It will not work properly or appear dead. This could mean there are open fusable resistors other defective parts in the power supply or elsewhere. In this case further testing will be required and at some point you may need the schematic.
Hope this help...

Jun 13, 2010 | Westinghouse LTV-32w4 32.02 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

Had a thunderstorm yesterday. now set will not power on. is there an inline fuse inside case or what else can i do?


Hello,
Power surges or nearby lightning strikes can destroy electronic equipment. However, most of the time, damage is minimal or at least easily repaired. With a direct hit, you may not recognize what is left of it!
Ideally, electronic equipment should be unplugged (both AC line and phone line!) during electrical storms if possible. Modern TVs, VCRs, microwave ovens, and even stereo equipment is particularly susceptible to lightning and surge damage because some parts of the circuitry are always alive and therefore have a connection to the AC line. Telephones, modems, and faxes are directly connected to the phone lines. Better designs include filtering and surge suppression components built in. With a near-miss, the only thing that may happen is for the internal fuse to blow or for the microcontroller to go bonkers and just require power cycling. There is no possible protection against a direct strike. However, devices with power switches that totally break the line connection are more robust since it takes much more voltage to jump the gap in the switch than to fry electronic parts. Monitors and TVs may also have their CRTs magnetized due to the electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike - similar but on a smaller scale to the EMP of a nuclear detonation.
Was the TV operating or on standby at the time? If it was switched off using an actual power switch (not a logic pushbutton or the remote control), then either a component in front of the switch has blown, the surge was enough to jump the gap between the switch contacts, or it was just a coincidence (yeh, right).
If the TV was operating or on standby or has no actual power switch, then a number of parts could be fried.
TVs usually have their own internal surge protection devices like MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) after the fuse. So it is possible that all that is wrong is that the line fuse has blown. Remove the cover (unplug it first!) and start at the line cord. If you find a blown fuse, remove it and measure across the in-board side of fuse holder and the other (should be the neutral) side of the line. The ohmmeter reading should be fairly high - well certainly not less than 100 ohms - in at least one direction. You may need to unplug the degaussing coil to get a reasonable reading as its resistance may be 25 or 30 ohms. If the reading is really low, there are other problems. If the resistance checks out, replace the fuse and try powering the TV. There will be 3 possibilities:
It will work fine, problem solved.
It will immediately blow the fuse. This means there is at least one component shorted - possibilities include an MOV, line rectifiers, main filter cap, regulator transistor, horizontal output transistor, etc. You will need to check with your ohmmeter for shorted semiconductors. Remove any that are suspect and see of the fuse now survives (use the series light bulb to cut your losses -
It will not work properly or appear dead. This could mean there are open fusable resistors other defective parts in the power supply or elsewhere. In this case further testing will be required and at some point you may need the schematic. Hope this helps...

Jun 02, 2010 | Westinghouse SK-32H240S Television

2 Answers

Sony wega kdf-e50a10 hit by lightning now it will not turn


follow the power cord and just check the input fuse if you've got a surge protector on it it may have just blown the fuse from a spike. It doesn't hurt to try. This fuse is inside the tv.

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

Have a Toshiba MW24F11 combo tv. Near lightning strike through surge suppressor. Will not turn on. 6.3 amp fuse blown; replace, blew again. Next step, or start looking for replacement. Set is 25...


power surges generally damage diodes and capacitors causing the fuse to blow, any reputable tv shop can repair for a fraction of replacing this set.

Sep 15, 2008 | Televison & Video

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