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How to upload an image into the service directory on craigslist?

When I look on craigslist, I try to upload an image for skilled trade services and the bubble that says add,edit images was not there. so how do I figure out a way to put pictures on there if they don't have an uploading area?

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YOU CAN'T.
this is controlled by the porvider or the website administrator.
if you want to be able to upload any files, you need to speak to the tech support of that website.

Posted on Nov 11, 2008

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Putting picture on craigslist


I think you need to save the picture as a .jpg You will then have saved the picture in your pictures folder. You should then be able to upload the picture to craiglist. If there is still aproblem I suggest you contact craiglist at this link(How to add images)
http://www.craigslist.org/about/help/images

Feb 25, 2014 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

I cannot upload photos into Craigslist while using Windows 7. I had no problem with Windows XP. Resizing the photos does not help. Can you help? Is it a defect with Win. 7? I also have problems...


Hi,
I don't think which OS you are using to upload a image to Craigslist. Means whether Win XP, Win7, Mac or any other os doesn't have n=anything to do with Craigslist's uploading.
As you said there might be some problem in Win7 finding a path through a third party method. See whether you system requirement for installing Win7. If the system requirement does not achieve the minimum such problems can arise in win7.
Hope this helps, please rate and let me know if any assistance needed, thanks!

Sep 03, 2011 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

3 Answers

How to instal joomla


follow this tutorial on youtube it will help you to install joomla:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJKeWzWZSBc&feature=channel

Jan 26, 2011 | Operating Systems

3 Answers

How we can remove active directory in windows 2003 safe mode ?


hello,

you just try to remove as force.

go to run, after this type " dcpromo /forceremoval ".

it will do this for you, if any issue on active directory or ad database.

you can do this command in normal or safe mode.

thanks,

Apr 25, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise...

1 Answer

Images cannot be seen.


Uploads, or downloads? What are you trying to do?

If you are talking about viewing images using Internet Explorer, check the Internet options.
Select < Tools>, <Internet Options>, select [Advanced] tab, then scroll down the checkbox list to "multimedia" and make sure the {load pictures} box is checked.

Jan 27, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium with...

1 Answer

Problem Uploading Photos to Craigslist


Hi kdnew,

Try a simple reboot to start . send yourself an image in email(this requires an alternate email)if this goes through it confirms you can send images over the internet. Also, try resizing your images in a photo editor, the system could be detecting images too large to upload.


anaanymous

Oct 16, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

3 Answers

DNS


DNS is the primary name resolution service for Windows Server 2003. Active Directory depends on DNS for domain controller location, and DNS influences Active Directory domain naming. Thus, to fully understand Active Directory, it helps to understand how DNS acts as an integral component in the design of Active Directory.

DNS provides Active Directory with both a name resolution service for domain controller location and a hierarchical design that Active Directory leverages to provide a naming convention that can reflect organizational structure.
Typically, a DNS domain namespace deployed to accommodate the Active Directory mirrors the Active Directory domain namespace. In cases where there is an existing DNS namespace prior to Active Directory deployment, the DNS namespace is typically partitioned for Active Directory, and a DNS subdomain and delegation for the Active Directory forest root is created. Additional DNS domain names are then added for each Active Directory child domain.
DNS data is used to support the location of Active Directory domain controllers also. During or after the creation of the DNS zones used to support Active Directory domains, the zones are populated with DNS resource records that enable network hosts and services to locate Active Directory domain controllers.

PS: As sourced from Microsoft Technet Site

Jul 24, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Regarding ActiveDirectory Services in Windows system


Active Directory (AD) is a technology created by Microsoft that provides a variety of network services, including: using the same database, for use primarily in Windows environments. Active Directory also allows administrators to assign policies, deploy software, and apply critical updates to an organization. Active Directory stores information and settings in a central database. Active Directory networks can vary from a small installation with a few hundred objects, to a large installation with millions of objects (though not easily [3]).
Active Directory was previewed in 1996, released first with Windows 2000 Server edition, and revised to extend functionality and improve administration in Windows Server 2003. Additional improvements were made in both Windows Server 2003 R2 and Windows Server 2008.
Active Directory was called NTDS (NT Directory Service) in older Microsoft documents. This name can still be seen in some AD binaries.
There is a common misconception that Active Directory provides software distribution. Software distribution is run by a separate service that uses additional proprietary schema attributes that work in conjunction with the LDAP protocol. Active Directory does not automate software distribution, but provides a mechanism by which other services can provide software distribution.

Jul 01, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

The File Replication Service has detected that the replica set "DOMAIN SYSTEM VOLUME (SYSVOL SHARE)" is in JRNL_WRAP_ERROR.


Make sure and keep copies of all the folders and files.
Take these actions to resolve your problem:
On all Active Directory registered domain controllers:
1. Stop NETLOGON Service
2. Stop File Replication Service (NTFRS)
On the PDC Emulator:
1. Rename all files in the %systemroot%\ntfrs folder and subfolders (change their extension to .old).
2. Give an unlisted account full control of the directory %systemroot%\SYSVOL folder and reset permissions on all child objects.
3. Change the registry key:
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\ntfrs\paramaters\Backup/Restore\Process at Startup\BurFlags (REG_DWORD) = D4 (The default on this is 0)
4. Start the NETLOGON Service
5. Start the NTFRS Service
On all non-PDC emulators:
1. Change the registry key:
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\ntfrs\paramaters\Backup/Restore\Process at Startup\BurFlags (REG_DWORD) = D2
2. Start the NETLOGON Service
3. Start the File Replication Service (NTFRS)
At this point, the system in question should have recreated the SYSVOL share and the NETLOGON share. Check this by running 'net share' from a command prompt. You should also see the Group Policy Objects listed in the SYSVOL directory as:
%systemroot%\SYSVOL\domain_name\Policies\{31B2F340-016D-11D2-945F-00C04FB984F9}
%systemroot%\SYSVOL\domain_name\Policies\{6AC1786C-016F-11D2-945F-00C04FB984F9}
There may be more directories listed here, but these are the Default Domain Policy and the Default Domain Controllers Policy that are installed by default when the Active Directory is created. If these are being replicated, then file replication is functioning.
If you cannot find these directories, then you may have to manually recreate them. Here is a list of the proper directory structure of the %systemroot%\SYSVOL folder:
\SYSVOL
________\domain
________________\DO_NOT_REMOVE_NtFrs_PreInstall_Directory
________________\Policies
________________\Scripts
________\scripts
________\staging
________\staging areas
________________\domain_name
________\sysvol (shared as SYSVOL)
________________\domain_name
________________________\DO_NOT_REMOVE_NtFrs_PreInstall_Directory
________________________\Policies
________________________\Scripts (shared as NETLOGON)
If you have to manually recreate the directories, restart the File Replication Service (NTFRS) on all domain controllers to re-enable replication. This should get the file replication functioning normally

Apr 25, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

Ris


Creating RIS images
As we have seen, CD-based RIS images can be created throug= h the RISetup utility. Additionally, there is RIPrep.exe, a utility that allows an administrator to clone a standard corporate desktop for deployment to other systems. In this section, we will examine the RIPrep utility, and also learn about creating RIS boot disks for compatible network adapters.
RIPrep
Unlike RISetup, which only allows an administrator to depl= oy a CD-based setup of Windows 2000 Professional (even a network-based installat= ion is just a copy of the files from the CD shared on a network drive), RIPrep = can be used to deploy the operating system plus customized settings and even locally installed desktop applications. This process is not the true disk cloning that products like Norton Ghost provide, as it can only be used with Windows 2000 Professional. Additionally, RIPrep does not support multiple h= ard drives or multiple partitions on the computer that the image is being creat= ed on.
Other limitations of RIPrep include the requirement that a CD-based image that is the same version and language as the RIPrep image also exist on the RIS server, and that the target system must have the same hardware abstraction layer (HAL) as the system us= ed to create the image. By having the same HAL, that means that an image created on a single processor system cannot be installed onto a dual processor system. Since Windows 2000 does not support Alpha processors like NT 4.0, you won't have to worry about mixing up Intel (I386) and Alpha images.
While there are limitations to RIPrep, there are advantage= s to it over using RISetup to create images. Most notably, RIPrep allows an administrator to create a standard desktop image and then use RIS to deploy= it to new computers as they come in from an OEM. Additionally, reinstallation = of the operating system is much faster from an RIPrep image since the image is being applied as a copy operation to the target hard drive and not running though an actually Windows 2000 installation as would happen with a CD or <= span class=3DGramE>network-based RISetup image.
Creating images with RIPrep
Creating an image with RIPrep is a two-step process. First= , you install and configure a computer with Windows 2000 Professional and the specific applications and settings you want to include in the image. Second, you run RIPrep.exe from the RIS server. There is an important distinction to keep clear. The RIPrep.exe utility is located on the RIS server, but is = executed from the RIS client that the image is being created on. From the client, cl= ick Start->Run and type:
\\RISserver\reminst\admin\i386\riprep.exe
If you attempt to run RIPrep.exe from a non-Windows 2000 Professional system, you receive an error message stating that the utility = will only run on Windows 2000 Professional. When you do, however, run RIPrep fro= m a valid system, the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard starts as shown in figure 13.13.
Figure 13.13 The Remote Installation Preparation Wizar= d is started by executing RIPrep.exe from a Windows 2000 Professional client com= puter
Even though you ran RIPrep.exe from one RIS server, you do= not have to necessarily copy the image you are creating to that particular serv= er. Figure 13.14 shows the next step in creating an image with RIPrep, where you choose which RIS server to copy the image to.
Figure 13.14 If you have multiple RIS servers on your network, you can choose which server should receive the image
The next step in creating the RIS image is to supply the n= ame of the installation directory on the RIS server previously chosen. Typically, = you would type the name of an existing directory only if you were replacing an existing image. If this new image will not be replacing an existing image, = type in a new directory name as shown in figure 13.15 and click next.
Figure 13.15 Supply a directory name on the RIS server= for the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard to copy the image
In our example, the image is being created for a corporate= web developer environment. For that reason, we gave the directory a descriptive name such as webdev in order to identify the image it contains on the RIS server.
In figure 13.16 we see the next step in creating an image,= which is assigning a friendly name to the image and creating the help text. The friendly name is what displays in the list of available images during the Client Installation Wizard. The help text provides an additional descriptio= n to help the user identify the correct image to use when acting as a RIS client= . In our example RIS image for a web development system, we list the applications that will be installed on the system along with the Windows 2000 Profession= al operating system as part of the imaging process.
Figure 13.16 By assigning a friendly name and help tex= t, users can identify the correct image to use during the Client Installation Wizard
If you have any programs or services running that could interfere with the imaging process, Windows 2000 will warn you. Figure 13.17 lists a number of programs and services that were running on the RIS image source workstation at the time this example image was being created. Once y= ou have closed the programs and stopped the necessary services, click next.
Figure 13.17 The Remote Installation Preparation Wizard prompts you to close any programs and services that might interfere with the imaging process.
Before beginning the actual image creation, the wizard all= ows you to review your choices. Notice in figure 13.18 that the folder name is incorrect. Initially we had created a generic folder that we had intended to use for RIS images, only to later decide to create separate subfolders for = each image. By reviewing the settings we had configured, we were able to back up through the wizard and change the folder name from RISimages to w= ebdev before starting the actual image creation.
Figure 13.18 Before starting the actual image creation= , take a moment to review your settings and ensure they are correct.
The last step, as shown in figure 13.19, is an information dialog from the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard that describes the process that is about to occur. Once you understand what is about to happen= on your system, click next to continue. You can watch the RIPrep wizard image process taking place, which will be similar to that shown in figure 13.20.<= /p> Figure 13.19 The RIPrep wizard informs you of how the = image process will take place on your system before beginning
Figure 13.20 The RIPrep wizard displays the current st= atus of the image process, showing the completed, current, and pending tasks
images created by the RIPrep wizard are stored in the same subfolder as images created during RISetup. If you took the default settings when we examined the RISetup wizard earlier in this chapter, and are using = an English language version of Windows 2000 Server, your RIS directory structu= re will be as follows:
* = \RemoteInstall\Setup\English\Image= s\win2000.pro\i386\ -- This is the default image created during the RISetup wizard earlier. The= re are subdirectories underneath i386 for this CD-based installation image, fo= r system32, templates, and uniproc.
* = \RemoteInstall\Setup\English\Image= s\webdev\i386\ -- This is the image directory we just created for our webdev image. There = is a directory called Mirror1 that appears under i386 that does not appea= r in the subdirectories of a RISetup created image.
RIPrep Files
In addition to the directory structure created, it is impo= rtant to know what files are important to the RIPrep image. These files are as follows:
* = RIPrep.log -- This ASCII text file documents the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard image process, listing any errors and relevant information that might be of troubleshooting use to an administrator.
* = Bootcode.dat -- This file is located in the \Mirror1 subdirectory of the image's i386 folder, and contains the boot sector information for the client system.
* = Imirror.dat -- This file also is located in the \Mirror1 directory, and contains installation information about the image source computer, such as the installation directory and the HAL type.
It is

Dec 13, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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