Question about Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater, 58" 240V/1250 Watts

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Marley md26 line voltage thermostat

Help with wiring. the thermostate has 2 red and 2 black. line from heater has 1-black 1-white + bare coper ground and supply has same. thermostate is a Marley md26 and base board is a farenheat electric/hydronic baseboard heater. all work at panel has been inspected and is good. i need to do this myself. have some experience with electrical. can some explain the wiring of both thermostat and and baseboard.

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The Black Wires from the md26 are your load(the heater) and the red lines are your line(power). The lines are also paired up on the thermostat with a red and black on the left and are red and black on the right. In the actual heater connect the black to the black wire and the white to the white and connect the grounds. In the thermostat connect the black from the heater to left side black( remember there are pairs left(black, red) right (black, red) and the white to the right side black connect the black from your power to the left side red and the white from your power to the right side red. Should be ready to go.

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

  • fzrwill Jul 14, 2011

    Thanks this was helpful as my instructions on the thermostat didn't show a diagram for 120 volt. The only thing that might confuse people is you don't specify if your looking at the thermostat from the front or the back when you say left side, or right side.

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Remember 240V heaters need both hot legs to work. The MD26 thermostat has two switches that operate independently and may need to be adjusted so that they both engage at the same time, or the heater will not turn on.

Posted on Jul 26, 2017

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I have a new heater with diferant terminals from the old one so not sure how to atach the wires


There is no need to rewire the internal of the heater!
Just bring in the electrical supply to the heater, it can be either 120 or 240 volts.
If the heater you have is like the picture associated with your post, then all then have to do is change the supplied plug from 240 to 120. It comes pre set for 240. That plug is inside the cabinet.

If any other brand, then you need to change the wires at the transformer of the heater. All heaters need to be supplied with primary voltage: 120 or 240. Then the control system is supplied with secondary voltage out of the transformer. The secondary voltage is no more than 28 volts. and these wires are normally colored as blue or yellow.

Secondary power is already wired within the heater. NO need to change where they are. You will only need to deal with the Primary wiring.

There are many varieties of transformers that transform high primary voltage to a low secondary voltage of 28 volts. and these transformers have many wires: primary & secondary.
I will try to make this easy to understand.

If you have a Gas Heater Transformer with these colors:
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or...
  • Red
  • White with Red Stripe
  • Black
  • White with Black Stripe
  • Green
These are Dual Voltage Transformers, you can bring in either 120 Volts or 240 Volts

If you bring in only 120 Volts...
1st example:
The Red wire will not be used! Hot wire to the Black, and the Neutral/Common, to the white wire. Green to ground.

2nd example:
Connect the Red wire with the White with Red Stripe together and connect these to the incoming Neutral/Common wire, normally White.
Connect the Black Wire with the White with Black Stripe to your incoming Hot Wire, which is normally Black.
Green to ground

If you bring in 240 Volts...
1st example.
1 Hot wire to the Red, the Other Hot wire to the Black, and White wire is not used. Green to ground

2nd Example:
Wire nut the two Striped wires together. then one incoming Hot wire to the Black, the other incoming Hot wire to Red.
Green to ground

Or This is only a Low voltage - 120 Volts Only
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or either any of these combinations...
  • 2 Blacks w/Green
  • 2 Reds w/Green
  • 1 Black, 1 Red w/green
This type will only be a high voltage, 240 volts only
Picture below is what a transformer looks like and it is where your incoming supply wires go. The smaller leads with the spade connections will go to a specific location & is the 'Secondary" .

Good Luck



25568369-di2jpn2pb5nzkrgf0hzbmyq5-3-0.jpg

Mar 14, 2015 | Pool & Spa

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Wiring a Westinghouse 3way speed switch.


Three way Switch installation; One cable has two wires plus a bare copper grounding wire, The other cable has three wires plus a ground.
1. Connect the black wire from the two-wire cable to the dark common screw terminal. 2. Connect the red and black wires from the three-wire cable to the traveler screw terminals. 3. Join the white neutral wires together with a wire connector and pigtail the grounding wires to the grounded metal box. 4. When the switch lies at the end of the circuit one cable enters the box. 5. The cable has a black wire, red wire, and white wire, plus a bare copper grounding wire. 6. Connect the black wire to the dark common screw terminal. 7. Connect the white and red wires to the two traveler screw terminals and the bare copper grounding wire to the grounded metal box.
I hope this help.

Mar 29, 2013 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

I need a wiring diagram for hayward pool filter model K48m2n11b3


Are you trying to wire a pool pump?
I found manuals at the Haywood site > I saw nothing for K48m2n11b or anything close to that number
http://www.haywardnet.com/inground/products/manuals.cfm

But lets work on the problem and see if I can give you some help:

After opening a few manual and searching for the word 'volt' and 'pump' ... each manual talks about 'pumps' generically, as if the pump is a separate purchase item.

Lower down on the manual page they have a list of pool pumps. A search for the word 'volt' inside the pump manuals says 'match supply voltage to motor nameplate voltage.'

As you know, each electric device has a label showing voltage, wattage, etc. Your pump should show 120Volts or 240V. I didn't see any mention of 3 phase wiring, so I assume your Haywood pump runs on typical residential wiring? And that you are not using 440Volt or 3 phase.

The 120Volt pump will have a black, white and bare ground.
The 240Volt pump will probably have a black, white, red and bare ground
The 240Volt pump could have a black white and bare ground

First the 120V pump:
The 120Volt line from your breaker box will have a black Hot wire, white Neutral wire and bare ground >>> this wire connects color-to-color with pool pump

Next the 240V pump with black, white, red and bare ground
a) The 240Volt line from your breaker box can have the same 4 wires, in which case they connect color-to-color
b) The 240Volt line from your breaker box could have a black white and bare ground, in which case the black goes to black, the white goes to red, the bare coppers are connected, the white pump wire is capped off and not used. If pump does not operate with this wiring, another line from the breaker with wires that match pump might be necessary.

The 240V pump with black white and bare ground
a) The 240Volt line from breaker can have black, white, red and bare ground, in which case the black goes to black, the red goes to white, bare grounds are connected, the white wire is capped off
b) The 240Volt line from from breaker can have black white and bare ground, and this connects color-to-color to the pump

HOW do you know if line from breaker is 120V or 240V?
If you know which breaker wire is connected to, then it's easy
If you do not know which breaker
-turn off power
-separate wires so they can be tested
-use ordinary tester
-stand on dry boards
-tape tester leads to sticks so hands are away from power

-turn on power
-test each wire to bare copper
-tester lights up on Hot wire
-120V line will have 1 Hot wire
-240V line will have 2 Hot wires

Oct 18, 2010 | Garden

1 Answer

Wire from circuit breaker is Black/White/Bare(ground). From Jenn Air is Black/White/RED/Green (ground). How do I wire? Jenn Air Black to Black, Jenn Air Red and White to White? Grounds (Jenn Air Green to...


depending on your local electrical code:and I see that the unit is 240 Volts A.C., then RED=Power/Black=POWER(L1 & L2)/WHITE="N"Neutral/and GREEN=SAFETY GROUND,on the new unit, then use from the wall power BLACK = L1 and White= L2. then on the unit RED=L1 and BLACK=L2(either way you hook these 2 up there isn't a polarity issue on these 2 wires) on the units hook-up/then use the BARE supply wire as neutral and tie BOTH WHITE and GREEN from the unit together to this BARE wire

Apr 29, 2010 | Jenn-Air JED8230 Electric Cooktop

1 Answer

My hot water heater has a red and a black wire,but the electric supply wires coming in to power the water heater have a red,black white and a bare ground. Which wires go where?


Your 220v hot water heater does not need the neutral(white) wire coming in. Bare wire goes to ground -green headed screw. Black goes to black, Red goes to red. White gets teminated with a wirenut or some electrical tape.

Jan 24, 2010 | Rheem 80 GAL ELEC TALL Water Heater 6YR SC...

2 Answers

I am trying to install a fahrenheat f2543 heater with a fta2a double pole thermostat. there is a 12/2 wire coming into where the heater is being installed. how do i connect the red and black to the white...


Hi, this is very easy for you to do.The 12/2 Romex wire coming in is the power which you know. What you do need to know, is the voltage coming in? Sometimes they will use 12/2 Romex with ground for 220, 240, operation. You need to know if the T-stat is Line voltage 220, or 240 volt. You have to have the same voltage for both for it to control. Reguardless of the voltage, lets say it is in the 220 and up range. You take one of the 12/2 wires, white or black and hook it to the black or red on the T-stat and the white to the other one, red or black. Thats it, you are done! If the T-stat is 2-pole I am sure it is a high, Line votage T-stat. Best of Luck,
Shastalaker7

Nov 09, 2009 | Fahrenheat Built-In Baseboard Thermostat...

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