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Office chair makes grinding noise when I sit down or get up.

There is a piston like thing in the support of my chair that raises and lowers my chair as I sit or stand.

I had a squeak when I would rock back and forth, so I used some shredder oil (which consists of mineral and soybean oils). This ran down the "trunk" of the chair and got into the "piston" and now it is not gliding smoothly anymore and making a bad noise when I get up or sit down. Did I ruin my chair? My co-workers can hear the noise! Please help!

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Hi this is Sachin , spray on the piston the silicon spary and leave for some time the grinding noise will be eliminated

Posted on Jun 30, 2010

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I have a 3 1/2 ton floor jack it is a craftman it will lift, but whene i put weight to it it will not lift anything where do you put the oil in to it. thanks gerald


Hi, Gerald -

You either need to top up the oil, or change the oil. Both of these are easy to do.
You'll need some high-grade jack oil, an Allen wrench, a rag or two, and a funnel.

1.) Relieve the pressure and lower the jack arm all the way down.
2.) Remove the tool tray from between the two rear wheels.
3.) Wipe the oil fill plug clean. (You don't want any gunk or debris falling inside.)
4.) Remove the plug with the Allen wrench.

Look inside. If the oil level is at or below the inner cylinder wall, you'll need to add oil. Don't go more than 3/16"-1/4" above the inner cylinder wall.

With the pressure still off, gently raise & lower the arm two or three times. Check and adjust your oil level again. Then screw the plug back in & tighten it with your Allen wrench.

Everything OK? Great. If not, repeat 1 through 4, then lay the jack on its side & drain ALL the oil out (into a container). When it's empty, set it upright & fill it. Again, raise & lower the arm several times.

Replace the plug, tighten it, then test. Raise the jack all the way up, then lower it all the way down, without any load on it. Repeat this two more times. (This helps to dissipate the air bubbles in the oil.) It should now be ready to use.

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I had a water line bust. After fixing the leak, I lost water pressure. Someone tried to fix the problem and now we have little to no water flow. I have to pumps . The smaller pump that feeds the house is...


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Conversely, turning the large nut counter-clockwise will lower the whole pump operating range. This is the simplest adjustment to make.
Photo (left) courtesy of a reader.
The nut atop the smaller spring in the pump pressure switch: this nut is used to narrow or widen the gap between the pump cut-on and pump cut-off pressures. This is the right-hand spring (and nut) in our photo).

Turning the small nut clockwise (tighter) will RAISE the CUT-OFF pressure, and vice versa, loosening or turning the nut counter-clockwise will lower the cut-off pressure. Watch out! If you loosen this nut too much you can set the cut-off pressure below the cut-on pressure and the pump will turn on and run forever (or until it burns up.)
Which nut to turn in the pump pressure switch control, and which direction to turn it, are usually visible on a label inside the pressure switch cover. Above we show photos of a common Square D water pump pressure control switch (Schneider Electric) and the label with pump control adjustment details. [Click to enlarge].
Here are Example Pump Pressure Switch Adjustment Instructions from Square -D Understanding how pump pressure control switches work and which way to turn which of the two nuts in the control can be confusing.
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