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Pictures too bright and not correct sound when taking the photograph - ring flash

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  • Anonymous Feb 18, 2009

    I have exilim s770 about 1 year old. the picture is too bright when I took at the day.

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You can adjust the brightness in the menu options.

Posted on Nov 05, 2008

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1 Answer

Flash goes every time, even when there is no lightning bolt in the screen (for lack of better terms). Also a few photos turn out blue that were taken indoors.


Hi,
210 wide camera is auto detect the environment. If you face it under bright light, the flash will auto off, if away from bright light, it will auto have flash. for photo have blue hue do show me the image, i take a look

Jan 10, 2014 | FUJIFILM Instax 210 Film Camera

1 Answer

My outdoor pictures are very very pale, almost white with stripes across the entire photograph


Too much bright when you taken the picture, try to turn off the flash light when capture outdoor or in bright room.
Hope this help.

Mar 09, 2011 | Fuji FinePix F10 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have loved this camera but everytime I take a flash picture it causes the subjects to close their eyes. I've never had this problem with other cameras. Is the flash not timed properly or is it too...


Are you using the red-eye setting? An initial flash causes the pupils of your subjects to contract, followed by a second full flash 1 second later.

The trouble is that the first flash is bright, and subjects think its all over so they blink, rub their eyes, look away, and even the photographer may be pointing the camera elesewhere by then.

It is better not to use that setting, and fix the red eye afterwards.
With the flash open, hit the right button until the eye icon goes away.

Dec 12, 2009 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D100 Manual shooting help


The mode dial (topside left) must be set to M. That's it for manual settings - the camera won't check anything, and certainly shouldn't require the flash. You need to choose your own shutter speed and aperture settings to get a good photo, but the camera will let you take a picture no matter how you have it set.

Feb 01, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Very grainy pictures indoors at night


If you can adjust the ISO sensitivity to a lower number then the graininess will be reduced.

However, by reducing the ISO, you will need a slower shutter speed and a larger aperture. A tripod, table or other support may be necessary.

The "noise reduction" setting on the camera can also be adjusted a step up.

Taking pictures at full resolution and fine compression will also help.
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Overall, at least try lowering the ISO, and using the flash brighter.


Jul 01, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Red Eye


Does your camera's flash have a redeye reduction mode? It should tell you in your camera's manual. Some cameras use a pre-flash method which causes the flash to fire several times in succession before firing the shutter in order to give the subject's eyes time to adjust to the bright light.

Redeye is actually caused by the flash being too close to the camera's lens. That's why you see professional photographers using a flash attached to their cameras by a cable so they can move it away from the lens. Because you have a compact camera, there is no way to change this flash to lens distance.

You might also try just turning the flash off. Unless you are taking pictures in a very dark area, you may find the results to be very satisfactory.

Dec 26, 2007 | Fuji FinePix A500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash makes my pictures too bright/too dark


u might want to try and put a coffee filter over your flash when you take pictures to make the flash less bright. it sounds really silly but it actually works.

Oct 29, 2007 | Samsung Digimax S500 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Sony DSC-P72 close up photos


A common problem is that you have some 3.2 Megapixel (MP) and that image is all of 640x480 or 0.3072 M. That means you could move back from the camera, shoot at 3.2 MP then crop out a 640x480 image that may be in focus.

Sep 08, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P72 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Rings On The Picture


Perhaps your camera flash reflected off a glass window directly back into the lens? Many camera lenses will capture "ghostly" reflections of the lens elements when a bright light shines directly into the lens. If you aim at the sun, you may also see spots or rings. Depending on the makeup of the camera lens (number of lens elements, types of coatings, etc) you may see spots, crescents, circles, or blobs of irregular shapes and colors in the final photo. Experiment to see if you can cause this behavior again, but don't look directly into the sun. Some photographers like the effect, others don't. Cal

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot A75 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

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