Question about Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air Conditioner

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Wiring a two stage heat pump to thermo trane an transformer

I went to a home to put in a new thermostat found out that there was a heat pump to it and fried the transformer now I cant get it wired to the thermostat or get the burner to kick on when I turn up the thermostat

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Replace the transformer.

Posted on Nov 22, 2008

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I want to replace a Honeywell Q674L with a Honeywell RTH6580WF for my heat pump. Which wire is the common or C wire?


The old mercury Q674's didn't require a common terminal, so if there's not an extra wire in the bundle you'll have to fish one up... Inside the old Trane, there should be either a terminal strip with the appropriate terminal designations or possibly a bundle of color coded wires. If they are wires, originally they may have had individual tags on them, but if there are none, you're going to have to refer to the wiring diagram for the correct color for transformer common. Or... find the secondary of the transformer to determine the correct one, then extend it up to the new digital stat.

Apr 17, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

Thermostat Wiring and Terminal Designations


Here is a list of each common terminal and what their commonly used for. Also listed is what colors are commonly used. NEVER ASSUME these are what you have. Verify all your wires by following each to each piece of equipment. This will help you to be able to match your equipment with the terminal.

- R, Rc, Rh Red wire, hot side of transformer
- C various color wires Usually the common side of transformer
- Y Yellow wire, Energizes the compressor, cooling or heating and cooling for heat pumps
- W White wire, heating for most units
- G Green wire, energizes the fan or blower relay.
- O Orange wire, energizes cooling on most heat pump units
- B Blue and sometimes Orange wire, energizes heat on most heat pump units
- B or X Blue, Black, or Brown wire, the common side of the transformer when the t-stat needs a common. Some brands use B as the common (York, GE, and Trane)
- E Pink, Gray or Tan wires, Emergency heat relay on heat pumps with auxiliary heat
- T Tan or Gray wires, For units with outdoor anticipator reset control (Trane, American Standard, GE, and Carrier)
- W2 Pink, or Brown wires energizes second stage heating on 2 stage units
- Y2 Blue or Pink wires, energizes second stage cooling on 2 stage units
- L Can be most any color, energizes service indicator lamp on units that are equipped with that.

The wires that always cause the most confusion are the B and X wires.
Check out the B terminal first. The NEMA standard for the B terminal to be the heating changeover valve but with some units it is different.

Trane, GE, York and some other manufactures which includes older Honeywell thermostats often use it for the common side of the transformer.
“X” Usually is the standard for common, but just like “B” some manufactures do use “X” or “X2” as the terminal for the emergency heat relay.

on Dec 12, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My wife bought a Hunter programmable thermostat to replace an ancient round Honeywell. The Honeywell is simple with the color coded wires simply going to the srews marked those colors. There are 5 wires,...


Normally the common wire is black, but installers can use anything, so you need to make sure that blue came off a "B" labeled screw. The common would normally be labeled "C". You need a simple multi-meter to check, although I have to believe that the instructions with the new thermo would have to cover the hookup and should show some extra connections if truly universal, as it would have to accommodate heat pumps and dual stage systems. With the old thermo mounted on the wall as it was originally with no wires connected, check for continuity between R and each of the other screws. Set thermo for cooling and turn temp down to 60 and see if you get continuity R to Y, set fan to on and see if you get continuity R to G, set thermo to heat and see if you get continuity R to W. If you just have a single wire that runs to the contactor in your condensing unit, and one wire for the heat, then the red is power from the transformer in the furnace, green is for the fan on all the time during cooling, yellow for the AC contactor, and white to bring on the heating cycle, IF ALL are single stage (only one setting for heat, cool, or fan that is either on/off). Check for continuity between R and B on each possible setting. If you get no continuity or greater resistance than on the other screws (when checking R to B), set meter to VAC and see if you get 24 volts between red and blue wires - the wires coming out of the wall and not the thermo screws. If so then you have a simple single stage for both heat and cool system. If you tape off the blue wire so that it can't contact anything in the new thermo then hook up the other wires as you state and see if everything works as it should. The blue wire in that case is a common that is not needed in your new thermo as it has its own internal battery power and does not need the common to power it from the transformer. Some systems actually use 2 transformers and the common does not run to the thermo as the other leg of each circuit is terminated elsewhere, but another wire does. If so, you will not get the readings above and you may need to do some rewiring - this is very unlikely.

Apr 25, 2017 | Hunter Fan Company 7-day programmable...

1 Answer

I have a Trane heat pump, model #TWP060C300A and a Trane air handler, model #TWE065E130A. Heat pump is 5.0 ton, split system. Air handler has a variable speed motor and a 20Kw 3-phase auxiliary heat strip....


Honeywell Chronotherm thermostats have always had a great reputation for longevity and reliability. They are also much more user-friendly than the other types of programmable thermostats out there. Make sure you get one that states 2-stage heat, heat pump. T8611G will offer that for you. There are many out there that claim to be suitable for heat pumps; however, they do not have the ability to utilize your auxiliary heat strips (2nd stage of heat).
Before you attempt to replace, be sure to write the wire colors and their corresponding terminal marking on a sheet of paper........of your old thermostat. This is very important to make it easier to hook up the new thermostat. Also, before you disconnect the wires, be sure to shut off the circuit breaker to your air handling unit. You can ensure you have the right one by putting the fan switch in "ON". When you turn off the right breaker, the fan will stop running. :-)

I hope you find this information to be very helpful to you. Please don't forget to leave a rating.

May 09, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

2 Answers

Trane Air Handler and Trane Thermostat with no power. Please help


First of all put back the jumper wire you remved Rc to Rh and also put the red wire to either one then the white to W, the green to G and the yellow to Y .That is for the thermostat wiring for a not heat pump outdoor unit.Remember this electronic thermostat has a time delay so the unit will take a few minutes to start.All this if the problem is the thermostat.But also when nothing works it could be that the drain line is clogh and some air handlers have a flood switch who shut the unit off if drain is clogh(it could be located in the drain line out of the air handler or inside it on the drain pan.) newer TRANE units have it inside.

Aug 13, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Thermostat wiring


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Please note. Not all installers use the proper color codes when they install or replace equipment. It may be necessary go go to the furnace or outdoor unit to verify what wires are for what purpose. Also be sure there are no splices in the wire that could change the wire colors between components.
  • R (red) or Rh (Red heat) 24 volts from equipment.
  • Rc (Red cooling) 24 volts from transformer in cooling equipment.
Note: If only furnace has a transformer and cooling equipment does not jumper Rc and Rh.
  • W (White) sends 24 volts to furnace control to start the heating cycle.
  • W2 (no standardized wire color, usually whatever wire color is available) controls second stage heat.
Note: W2 is most often used for heat pumps to control what is called emegency heat or Auxillary heat, and most often will use the white wire.
  • Y (yellow) often (blue) is used, controls cooling unit (outdoor condensing unit) also is used for heat pump heat.
  • Y2 (no standardized wire color, usually whatever wire color is available) controls second stage cooling.
  • G (Green) controls the fan "on" operation of the furnace/air handler. Also often is used to start the blower for many electric furnaces.
  • C (common) most often brown but can also be black or other color available to installer.
  • O (orange) Energizes heat pump reversing valve for cooling (Trane and most other brands).
  • B (Blue) Energizes heat pump reversing valve for heating (Rheem, Ruud and Weatherking).

Jun 02, 2009 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Need wiring for honeywell pro 3000 in trane xe1200


the pro 300 is a single stage thermostat and can not be wired to control 2 heat stages seperately

May 16, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I need help with my central heat and air unit, it has a heat pump. the model number is GQ3RA-036K. I am changing the theromstat out and the wires are connected to it. there are eight wire colors that are...


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Thermostat wire color codes explained.
Please note. Not all installers use the proper color codes when they install or replace equipment. It may be necessary go go to the furnace or outdoor unit to verify what wires are for what purpose. Also be sure there are no splices in the wire that could change the wire colors between components.
  • R (red) or Rh (Red heat) 24 volts from equipment.
  • Rc (Red cooling) 24 volts from transformer in cooling equipment.
Note: If only furnace has a transformer and cooling equipment does not jumper Rc and Rh.
  • W (White) sends 24 volts to furnace control to start the heating cycle.
  • W2 (no standardized wire color, usually whatever wire color is available) controls second stage heat.
Note: W2 is most often used for heat pumps to control what is called emegency heat or Auxillary heat, and most often will use the white wire.
  • Y (yellow) often (blue) is used, controls cooling unit (outdoor condensing unit) also is used for heat pump heat.
  • Y2 (no standardized wire color, usually whatever wire color is available) controls second stage cooling.
  • G (Green) controls the fan "on" operation of the furnace/air handler. Also often is used to start the blower for many electric furnaces.
  • C (common) most often brown but can also be black or other color available to installer.
  • O (orange) Energizes heat pump reversing valve for cooling (Trane and most other brands).
  • B (Blue) Energizes heat pump reversing valve for heating (Rheem, Ruud and Weatherking).

May 07, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

3 Answers

Trane XL19i 8? ton heat pump not heating very well


Your second stage heat check the dip switches on the board and the wires to the proper two stage heat t-stat.

Feb 06, 2009 | Omega Trane Furnace Draft Inducer Blower...

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