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How to you change the battery on a hugo max watch

I can't get the back of the watch off

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Noggin
  • 944 Answers

SOURCE: Hugo Boss watch

go to this link and find your nearest Movado Group(they make and repair the watches) service centre; http://a3.geoserve.com/scripts/esrimap.dll?Name=L&Com=fo&Db=DLRMovall&Ds=Movado&Filt=User4%20LIKE%20'_S%25' They can probably answer your question over the phone or e-mail, if not they certainly could if you could get the watch inspected. Most jewellers would also probably know - sometimes the serial number can be marked inside the watch, but I found no information online about your model that discusses this. Hope this helps, hope it's real :)

Posted on Mar 25, 2007

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  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: hugo maxx mens watch battery

I have a Hugo Max HM13 watch with 10 diamonds and it uses a silver oxide battery No. AG4, or 377 or LR626 or SR626SW or 177. These are different numbers for the same 1.55v battery.
Bill

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

willy16
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Cannot start new Hugo Boss Watch

check the battery, if it still wont work then try shaking it and see if there is something loss inside if there is, you bought the watch with already a technical problem
SORRY!!!

Posted on Nov 09, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: watch battery

i dont know how i change the battery to a hugo boss watch

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: have lost back for Hugo boss gents watch is there

If you are in the UK try calling 01428 664700 - we are the official distributor for Boss Watches in the UK....

Posted on Feb 25, 2010

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1 Answer

I have an old Casio watch 863 SDB-500W, I have just change the battery . Light is working but nothing is display. How to reset it ?


To reset the watch, you need to 'short' the reset point with the battery. To do this, with the watch face down and the back removed the 'Reset' point is in the bottom right hand corner (a gold-coloured contact point). Use a pair of metal tweezers or an unbent paper-clip (anything as long as it's metal and will touch the reset point and the back of the battery at the same time). Maintain contact for about 5 seconds and you should get the display back.
I've just changed the battery in my SDB 500W and the above method worked. I did lose the audible 'beep' though and I'm currently on the net trying to find how to get it back. That's how I found your question... :)

Jul 24, 2011 | Bulova Watch

1 Answer

How do i change the battery?


If you have a Timex digital watch, the back of your watch is probably attached with four little screws, one at each corner of the case. If you remove the screws, the back of the case should lift off with only a little nudge in case some grunge has glued the back to the rest of the case.

On the other hand, if you have an analog Timex watch (i.e., one with a traditional face), it almost certainly has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches with snap-fit cases have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker, you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 31, 2011 | Timex Watches

1 Answer

How do I open the back of the Acqua Indiglo watch so I can change the CR2016 battery?


Your watch has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker (Aqua is a discount brand of Timex), you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

CANNOT GET BACK OPEN TO REPLACE BATTERY


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back, just in case I'm wrong.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for a pretty reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

How to open


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back just in case I'm wrong.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they can be tough to get off, but they're even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

May 29, 2011 | Peugeot 194M Wrist Watch

1 Answer

How do i put the back on the watch after changing battery


Your watch has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place.

A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case presses and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for a pretty reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 28, 2011 | Timex Indiglo Analog Watch

1 Answer

I have a ZR11622 I can't get the back off to replace the battery!


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, Relic case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

May 26, 2011 | Relic Watches

2 Answers

What type of battery does the Fossil Ch2473 use? I called Fossil and they could not help me, instead they insisted I pay them $15 to replace the battery and wait 2-4 weeks for shipping. However, I...


The vast majority of Fossil analog wristwatches take either a #377 or #379 watch battery. The #379, being slightly smaller, is somewhat more commonly found in women's watches than in men's watches, but I have seen both types used in men's and women's watches alike. However, the Fossil CH2473 includes chronograph functions, which means that you can have multiple motors inside the watch running simultaneously. As a result, it's possible that this watch will require a different / bigger bigger. However, if it's not one of these batteries, or even if it takes a 3-volt lithium battery instead of a 1.5 volt watch battery, it will still be something pretty mundane.

In general, common batteries like the type I expect you'll find inside your watch are commonly found at many drug stores, jewelry store counters at places like Walmart and Target, and even at some dollar stores. Be aware that cheap dollar store batteries are usually alkaline, not silver oxide, versions of the same size battery. Alkaline batteries may work perfectly well in many watches, but they have a somewhat different energy performance curve over time, and, in general, they won't last quite as long as a comparable silver oxide battery. In addition, for reasons I've never been able to figure out, some of the Fossil watches that I've serviced would not function with an alkaline battery--but would work fine when I put in a silver oxide battery of the same size and voltage. I have not been able to see a pattern to predict when this will and will not occur. Lithium batteries, whether "brand name" or generic, should have the same performance curve.

If you do open up your watch to change the battery and don't recognize the battery type/code on your battery, don't give up. Watch batteries have different numbering schemes, depending on the manufacturer. Here's a link to a cross-reference chart that will help you "translate" one code into another. I would suggest starting by looking at the #377 line to see if one of those cross-reference codes matches what you have. However, you may need to look around the chart to get an exact match:

http://www.watchbatteries.com/custom.aspx,,id,,75

As a final thought, the backs of some Fossil watches are very snugly fitted to their cases. You can generally get them off without too much of a problem, but there's a good chance you may need a jeweler's press to get them to snap back on properly. I've noticed this most with round watch backs; I generally haven't needed a press to close oblong or tonneau-shaped Fossil watches (or some round watches, too). A jeweler's press spreads the pressure evenly around the edges of the watch back and watch case, preventing damaging pressure on the watch crystal, watch movement, and watch back. Clamping the watch in a regular vise to try to press on the back runs a high risk of damaging your watch, and I do not recommend trying that, no matter how frustrated you get. It's much safer (and cheaper, overall) to tip someone with a vise a couple of dollars to close up your watch for you.

May 15, 2011 | Fossil CH2473 Watch for Men

1 Answer

I am needing to find out what kind or size battery The Fossil Blue AM-3574 takes and where I can purchase them.


The vast majority of Fossil analog wristwatches take either a #377 or #379 watch battery. The #379, being slightly smaller, is somewhat more commonly found in women's watches than in men's watches, but I have seen both types used in men's and women's watches alike.
These batteries are commonly found at many drug stores, jewelry store counters at places like Walmart and Target, and even at some dollar stores. Be aware that cheap dollar store batteries are usually alkaline, not silver oxide, versions of the same size battery. Alkaline batteries may work perfectly well in many watches, but they have a somewhat different energy performance curve over time, and, in general, they won't last quite as long as a comparable silver oxide battery. In addition, for reasons I've never been able to figure out, some of the Fossil watches that I've serviced would not function with an alkaline battery--but would work fine when I put in a silver oxide battery of the same size and voltage. I have not been able to see a pattern to predict when this will and will not occur.
As a final thought, the backs of some Fossil watches are very snugly fitted to their cases. You can generally get them off without too much of a problem, but there's a good chance you may need a jeweler's press to get them to snap back on properly. I've noticed this most with round watch backs; I generally haven't needed a press to close oblong or tonneau-shaped Fossil watches (or some round watches, too). A jeweler's press spreads the pressure evenly around the edges of the watch back and watch case, preventing damaging pressure on the watch crystal, watch movement, and watch back. Clamping the watch in a regular vise to try to press on the back runs a high risk of damaging your watch, and I do not recommend trying that, no matter how frustrated you get. It's much safer (and cheaper, overall) to tip someone with a vise a couple of dollars to close up your watch for you.

May 12, 2011 | Fossil Blue watch #AM3574 Watch for Men

1 Answer

My battery is running dead . Can I have it replaced ?


Yes, the battery for this watch can be replaced. Timex estimates that the battery should last 2-3 years, but that assumes an "average" use of the Indiglo backlight. If you never use the backlight or audible alarms, your batteries would have lasted longer; heavy use of both would have run the battery down more quickly.
If you want to replace the watch battery yourself, you'll need a very fine philips or flathead screwdriver, the new battery, and a bit of patience. It would also be helpful to have a pair of tweezers, but that's not absolutely necessary. If you carefully look on the back of your watch, Timex usually lists the battery type so that you can buy a replacement battery without first opening the watch. If you can't figure out what the numbers mean, take it to a jewelry counter at Target or Walmart, and they should be able to help you decipher it. I don't know which battery this specific watch takes, but many Timex watches use a #1620 or #2016 3v battery. Look for a number like that on your watch back.
To open up the back of the watch, open the strap so that you have good access to the back. If you have a steel band, you might need to slip out one of the adjustment pins to separate the band into halves. Yes, you might be able to take the back off without this step, but it makes it a lot easier.
Place the watch face down onto a soft surface. I like to use a dark towel, so that if I drop one one of the tiny screws you'll be dealing with in a minute, they won't bounce and you can easily find them again.
Use your screwdriver to loose the back of the watch, one screw at a time. I find it very helpful to loosen a screw, then use the tweezers to pick it up out of the hole. These guys are tough to grab with your fingers! Put the screw in a safe place, then carefully remove the back of the watch. A little black neoprene gasket may be stuck to the back or be floating around--don't lose that!
You should be able to see where the battery is kept. On most Timex watches, there's a metal shield covering the watch and completing the power circuit. Using your screwdriver, gently pry the tabs of this shield away from the watch movement, one tab at a time. Try very hard not to snap off any of the little plastic anchors. On a Casio watch I recently serviced, I had to remove the movement from the watch to get at these little tabs; I don't remember ever having to do that with a Timex.
Once the shield is loose or removed, the battery should slide right out. Replace the battery, and gently snap down the metal shield. Turn the watch over to check whether it's working again. If it's not, you may have to push a little "reset" pin on the watch movement to clear the registries. The back of the metal shield usually has instructions on where that little pin is located. If the watch is already working, you won't need to do this.
Closing up the watch is the reverse of what you did to get it open. Make sure the neoprene gasket is back in place--that's what's keeping sweat and water out of the watch--and carefully set the cover back in place. Tighten the screws in an "X" pattern--i.e., top left, then bottom right, then bottom left, then top right. I get all the screws loosely screwed in before tightening them down in earnest. This watch has a plastic case, so you want to tighten the screws snugly, but not over-tighten them so that they strip out the screw hole.

May 10, 2011 | Timex Ironman 30 Lap 53952 Wrist Watch

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