Question about Barska Optics Barska 10-40x50 Ir Swat Tactical Riflescope Ac10550

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8x32 swat scope

Impossible to focus on power setting higher than 20x. The scope will not focus, whites out in all but very bright light and then sometimes there also. Parallax is impossible.
Have returned scope twice to check and repair.

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  • Anonymous Dec 07, 2008

    have same problem!! whats up???????????

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  • 8 Answers

It's not a high end scope. Most times you're better off buying a lower power scope of better quality and you'll still be able to see more clearly than with a higher power yet lower quality scope.

Consider that 6x, and lower power, scopes were pretty much standard for WWII snipers, and that fixed 10x is still an accepted power level for snipers these days.

Posted on Nov 26, 2008

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Science tech 262 manual


Can't find a manual. This is a 76mm reflector on a Alt/AZ mount.
1. During the day, put in the 20mm eyepiece and point to a object around 100 yards away.
2. Focus on the object
3. Align the finder to the object in the eyepiece
4, Set up at night, give the scope time to reach outside temperature
5. Point scope with finder at the moon. (More than half full will be too bright)
6 Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) and focus on the moon.
7. You may now use higher power eyepieces to observe.
8. Pointing the scope usually involves loosing 2 knobs to move the scope in up/down and side to side motion. There may be slow motion controls to adjust the scope as objects in the sky move.

Nov 27, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 24, 2011 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

2 Answers

All we see through the telescope is black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 08, 2011 | Tasco Novice 30060402 (402 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

I cannot see anything and what is the finder scope on top for?


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 06, 2011 | National Geographic 76AZ (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

See nothing through my brand new telescope


I suggest that you try the telescope first in daylight (NOT pointed at or near the Sun), using the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the largest number). Try it on objects on the horizon, remembering that they will appear upside down. This is a good time to get the accessory viewfinder scope lined up with the main scope, too. It is unlikely that the finder scope will be much use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope.

When you have become familiar with the low power eyepiece, try a higher power, which will focus at a different point (and be harder to find objects with). Then try it out at night, on a bright, easily found object like the moon.

The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. Do not use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. There is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications.

Jan 02, 2011 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope w/Talking...

1 Answer

I dontknow how to look through it andfocus on a star,or moon


Hi Joe, I'm Mark.
The small scope on top of your big scope is called the "finder" scope. Probably 2X or 4X. It should have cross hairs in the view. Find the moon with it. It will also require focusing but since the moon is bright, you can get an idea where it is in the lens by that.
Next. Find the LOWEST power eyepiece to insert into the lens holder. And rotate the focus knob.
Hopefully, you will see some bright blurry thing and then you can focus on it.
After you get it in focus, put on a more powerful lens and look at the craters on the moon.
Note: You will need to adjust your telescope to the earth's rotation. Your scope should have
instructions for accomplishing this.
Hope this helps,
Best, Mark

Dec 28, 2010 | Tasco 200x50mm Refractor Telescope

1 Answer

Polaris by meade all set up but cant see anything but a white light.


Sounds like it is severely unfocussed. Finding the focus point on an astronomical telescope is often difficult until you have had experience with it, as the range of adjustment is very long to accommodate eyepieces of different focal lengths.

I suggest that you try the telescope first in daylight (NOT pointed at or near the Sun), using the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the largest number). Try it on objects on the horizon, remembering that they will appear upside down. This is a good time to get the accessory viewfinder scope lined up with the main scope, too. When you have become familiar with the low power eyepiece, try a higher power, which will focus at a different point (and be harder to find objects with). Then try it out at night, on a bright easily found object like the moon.

Nov 30, 2010 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

1 Answer

Just bought used 8x32 swat not sure how to use it. are the win and elev numbers for shooting or just for siteing in rifle


They are for sighting in the rifle only.I know on TV the shooter reaches up and turns a knob.BOGUS! after sighting in the rifle, always replace the little caps because the scope is not sealed unless the caps are on.without the caps, moisture can penetrate the scope and fog the lenses.Good Luck

Dec 08, 2008 | Barska Optics Barska 10-40x50 Ir Swat...

1 Answer

Recoil from 300WSM


Well, it Barska says it's .50 cal proofed, whatever that means. One would presume it could take 30 magnum recoil then.

On the other hand, Barska is a low end quality manufacturer. You cannot expect durability in a low end scope. Of course, you could get lucky.

Unless you're target shooting at an immovable object, 10x - 40x is much more power than you'll ever be able to use. You're much, much better off considering a 4x - 16, for instance, in a higher end scope line than this scope.

Consider that at 40x the exit pupil would only be 1.25 which would make even the highest quality scopes quite dim. Barska won't have be best glass in the world and so would probably be unusable beyond some level like 18x unless in very favorable conditions anyway.

The problem with heavy recoilers and scopes is that the heavier the scope the more likely it is to take damage due to recoil. It's because it hangs out there on those high scope rings, and is heavy.

Nov 06, 2008 | Barska Optics Barska 10-40x50 Ir Swat...

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